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Biostatistics Core Facility

Biostatistics Core Facility
Director: Jeffrey Longmate, Ph.D.
Co-Director: David Smith, Ph.D.

The Biostatistics Core facility is a group of statisticians who collaborate in basic, translational, and clinical research in the Cancer Center. The Core is supported by City of Hope’s NCI-funded Cancer Center Support Grant (CCSG), and its services are available to City of Hope researchers.

”The central requirement for successful collaboration is clear, broad, specific, two-way communication on both scientific issues and research roles.”

-- Moses and Thomas, Chapter 18 in Medical Uses of Statistics, 2nd ed., NEJM Books, 1992

Scientific Issues: Areas of statistical expertise include: clinical trials; clinical epidemiology; genetic epidemiology; gene expression and functional genomics; pharmacokinetic modeling; assays, bioassays, and diagnostics; toxicology; and general statistical methods for data summary, inference and prediction;

Research Roles: Core members can help with study design, grant proposals, clinical protocols, data analysis, and manuscripts.
 
Services
Collaboration is our main activity. The core statisticians generally contribute to the design and analysis of research projects as co-investigators and co-authors. We collaborate in basic, translational, clinical and population-based research.

Consulting is available to advise investigators on statistical issues in research. Consulting generally consists of one or two meetings, and it’s free. This is a good way to explore possible collaboration, or just get statistical questions answered.

Case finding: The core can provide HIPAA-compliant identification of patients with stored tissue samples or other characteristics.

Statistical Computing is provided in conjunction with collaboration.

To access services or to use the facility, please contact usat 626-256-HOPE (4673), ext. 61444 or viaemailto schedule an appointment.
 
Research reported in this publication included work performed in the Biostatistics Core supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under award number P30CA33572. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
 

Abstract for Grants

The Biostatistics Core is directed by Dr. Jeffrey Longmate, Director of the Division of Biostatistics, with Dr. David D. Smith serving as Co-Director. The Biostatistics Core draws effort from a large part of the Division of Biostatistics, with the Biostatistics Core enabling their participation in Cancer Center-related pilot projects and proposals, which may later develop into externally funded projects.  The Biostatistics Core is directly involved in Cancer Center research from the inception of a research idea to the publication of results.

Clinical research projects account for the largest portion of core use, but the Biostatistics Core also supports basic and translational research, as well as assisting several other cores.  The Biostatistics Core staff collaborate closely with the Biomedical Informatics core to support data processing and analysis of gene expression microarrays, and the Biostatistics Core works closely with both the Clinical Research Informatics Core and the Clinical Trials Management Core to implement City of Hope-conducted or coordinated clinical protocols.  In addition to these ongoing collaborative efforts, there have been more technically-focused projects in which the Biostatistics Core has supported the other cores in the implementation of technologies that involve statistical measurement issues.  This has recently included the Affymetrix Core, the Clinical Immunobiology Correlative Studies Lab, and the Genotyping Core.
 
Services include:
Collaboration is our main activity.  The core statisticians generally contribute to the design and analysis of research projects as co-investigators and co-authors.   We collaborate in basic, translational, clinical and population-based research.
 
Consulting is available to advise investigators on statistical issues in research.  Consulting generally consists of one or two meetings, and it’s free.  This is a good way to explore possible collaboration, or just get statistical questions answered.
 
Case finding:  The core can provide HIPAA-compliant identification of patients with stored tissue samples or other characteristics.
 
Statistical Computing is provided in conjunction with collaboration.
 
The Division of Biostatistics is located in the Information Sciences Bldg. (Bldg. #171).
 

Using the Facility

The core encourages collaboration, so investigators are free to contact faculty statisticians directly. Investigators can request an introduction or consulting appointment by phone or email:
 
Phone: 626-256-HOPE (4673) Ext. 61444
Email: BiostatisticsCore
 
Investigators are encouraged to consult with a statistician early in their planning.
Any core-clearance forms required by administration should reflect collaborations already in place.

Pricing

An initial consulting appointment is available without charge.
 
Grant proposals should cover the effort of participating core staff.  The minimum effort for salary support on proposals is 5%.  Any smaller effort should be requested as an expense rather than personnel.
 
Clinical research projects without grants (e.g. internal or industry funding) should budget an estimated cost for core staff time.
 
In some circumstances (e.g. preliminary work for a grant proposal, a basic science project with an unanticipated need for statistical data analysis, or a small grant program that explicitly limits the use of funds) the investigator may request effort that is supported by core funds.  Not all requests can be accommodated.   Priority is given to Cancer Center members and grant proposals, with the expectation that future effort will be funded.
 

Contact Us

Jeffrey Longmate, Ph.D.
Director
626-256-HOPE (4673), 62478
jlongmate@coh.org

David Smith, Ph.D.
Co-Director
626-256-HOPE (4673)
dsmith02@coh.org
 
Location
City of Hope and Beckman Research Institute
1500 East Duarte Road
Duarte, CA  91010-3000
 
Information Sciences Building (#171)
Phone:  626-256-HOPE (4673), Ext. 61444
Fax:  626-471-7106 or 626-301-8802
 

Biostatistics Core Facility Directors

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
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800-888-5323
dgrignetti@coh.org

 

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213-241-7160
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213-241-7112
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