A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Breast Cancer Survival

For women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, we’re ahead of the curve in providing better options that can lead to higher survival rates.  These options include surgical, medical and radiation therapies.
 
City of Hope is one of the few hospitals providing the latest advances in radiation therapy for breast cancer patients — intraoperative radiation therapy, or IORT. During surgery, patients receive a concentrated dose of precise radiation, rather than the normal follow up plan of six to eight weeks of daily radiation treatments.  IORT allows one day as opposed to six to eight weeks of daily radiation, with the exact same excellent results.
 
In addition, we have an extensive research program for women with breast cancer with more than 20 clinical trials, to help women find the right treatment for them.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The chart below compares survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had breast cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rates for patients treated at other cancer programs that report to the Commission on Cancer (CoC). 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
 
 

Breast Cancer Outcomes

Breast Cancer Survival

For women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, we’re ahead of the curve in providing better options that can lead to higher survival rates.  These options include surgical, medical and radiation therapies.
 
City of Hope is one of the few hospitals providing the latest advances in radiation therapy for breast cancer patients — intraoperative radiation therapy, or IORT. During surgery, patients receive a concentrated dose of precise radiation, rather than the normal follow up plan of six to eight weeks of daily radiation treatments.  IORT allows one day as opposed to six to eight weeks of daily radiation, with the exact same excellent results.
 
In addition, we have an extensive research program for women with breast cancer with more than 20 clinical trials, to help women find the right treatment for them.
 
A national database of cancer outcomes is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.  Each year, the National Cancer Database (NCDB) provides data to hospitals to allow each institution to compare its results with those obtained nationally.
 
The chart below compares survivorship over a five year period for City of Hope patients, who have had breast cancer and were treated by surgery, with patients nationally who have had the same treatment for the same stages of their disease.
 
At City of Hope, our survivorship exceeds the survival rates for patients treated at other cancer programs that report to the Commission on Cancer (CoC). 
Data include both patients diagnosed at City of Hope and those who visit post-diagnosis as well as initial treatment elsewhere.   Higher curves for City of Hope indicate better survival results, reflecting excellent care at City of Hope.  Although some variation between the curves may also be due to timing of referral to City of Hope, and other details of the patients’ situations.
 
 
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Join thousands and walk for women’s cancers, women’s cures, on Nov. 2, 2014 in Los Angeles. Event details »
Join our giving circle and help decide which breast cancer research programs to fund. Read more »
 
Low-dose Tamoxifen for Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Trial
 
A clinical research study is currently underway to see if low-dose tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in childhood, adolescent, and young adulthood cancer survivors.
The Positive Image Center is where licensed cosmetologists support and assist patients with building and maintaining self-confidence in their appearance. Patients can access wig fittings and stylings and discuss cosmetic techniques.
 
Cooper Finkel Women’s Health Center
Many gynecological cancer and breast cancer  services at City of Hope are provided at the Rita Cooper Finkel and J. William Finkel Women's Health Center. Here, women receive the highest quality care, whether seeking prevention and screening services or coping with a cancer diagnosis.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • We’ve seen it in science fiction: The aliens begin terra-forming a planet to create a friendly habitat that gives them, not the inhabitants, all the advantages when the colonization begins. Turns out, cancer does essentially the same thing when it metastasizes, according to new research from City of Hope. The f...
  • Equipping the immune system to fight cancer – a disease that thrives on mutations and circumventing the body’s natural defenses – is within reach. In fact, City of Hope researchers are testing one approach in clinical trials now. Scientists take a number of steps to turn cancer patients’ T cells – white b...
  • As treatments for lung cancer become more targeted and effective, the need for better technology to detect lung cancer mutations becomes increasingly important. A new clinical study at City of Hope is examining the feasibility of using blood and urine tests to detect lung cancer mutations, potentially allowing ...
  • When it comes to breast cancer risk, insulin levels may matter more than weight, new research has found. The study from Imperial College London School of Public Health, published in the journal Cancer Research, indicates that metabolic health – not a person’s weight or body mass index – increases breast cancer ...
  • No one ever plans to have cancer – and there’s never a good time. For Homa Sadat, her cancer came at a particularly bad time: just one year after losing her father to the pancreatic cancer he had battled for two years. She was working a grueling schedule managing three commercial office buildings. She’d just [&...
  • Patients at City of Hope – most of whom are fighting cancer – rely on more than 37,000 units of blood and platelets each year for their treatment and survival. Every one of those units comes from family, friends or someone who traded an hour or so of their time and a pint of their […]
  • Surgery is vital in the treatment of cancer – it’s used to help diagnose, treat and even prevent the disease – so a new colorectal cancer study linking a decrease in surgeries for advanced cancer to increased survival rates may raise more questions than it answers for some patients. The surgery-and-surviv...
  • Age is the single greatest risk factor overall for cancer; our chances of developing the disease rise steeply after age 50. For geriatric oncology nurse Peggy Burhenn, the meaning is clear: Cancer is primarily a geriatric condition. That’s why she is forging inroads in the care of older adults with cancer. Burh...
  • One of American’s great sportscasters, Stuart Scott, passed away from recurrent cancer of the appendix at the young age of 49. His cancer was diagnosed when he was only 40 years old. It was found during an operation for appendicitis. His courageous fight against this disease began in 2007, resumed again with an...
  • When Homa Sadat found a lump in her breast at age 27, her gynecologist told her what many doctors say to young women: You’re too young to have breast cancer. With the lump dismissed as a harmless cyst, she didn’t think about it again until she was at a restaurant six months later and felt […]
  • What most people call a “bone marrow transplant” is not actually a transplant of bone marrow; it is instead the transplantation of what’s known as hematopoietic stem cells. Such cells are often taken from bone marrow, but not always. Hematopoietic stem cells are simply immature cells that can ...
  • Doctors have long known that women with a precancerous condition called atypical hyperplasia have an elevated risk of breast cancer. Now a new study has found that the risk is more serious than previously thought. Hyperplasia itself is an overgrowth of cells; atypical hyperplasia is an overgrowth in a distorted...
  • Don’t kid yourself. Just because it’s mid-January doesn’t mean it’s too late to make resolutions for a happier, and healthier, 2015. Just consider them resolutions that are more mature than those giddy, sometimes self-deluded, Jan. 1 resolutions. To that end, we share some advice from Cary A. Presant, M.D., an ...
  • Sales and marketing executive Jim Murphy first came to City of Hope in 2002 to donate blood for a friend who was being treated for esophageal cancer. The disease is serious. Although esophageal cancer accounts for only about 1 percent of cancer diagnoses in the U.S., only about 20 percent of patients survive at...
  • Aaron Bomar and his family were celebrating his daughter’s 33rd birthday in September 2014 when he received alarming news: According to an X-ray taken earlier that day at an urgent care facility, he had a node on his aorta and was in danger of an aneurysm. Bomar held hands with his wife and daughter and s...