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Cancer and Aging Research Program

The number of older patients with cancer and surviving cancer is rapidly growing because the U.S. population is aging with a projected doubling in the number of patients 65 and older by 2030. Although the majority of cancers occur in older adults, these patients have been under-represented in national cancer clinical trials, which set the standards for oncology care. Few studies have specifically focused on the unique issues which face older adults such as the impact of age related declines in physiology, polypharmacy or comorbid medical conditions on treatment tolerance.
 
Arti Hurria, M.D. leads City of Hope's Cancer and Aging Research Program, the mission of which is to join investigators from all cancer disciplines to study biology, treatment and survivorship issues that face older adults with cancer. The results of this research will be applicable to the majority of patients with cancer because approximately 60 percent of cancer diagnoses and 70 percent of cancer mortality occur in patients over the age of 65.
 
In addition, Hurria established the Cancer and Aging Research Group in order to further research in geriatric oncology. This group is comprised of physicians and researchers across the country who collaborate in many different clinical trials benefiting older adults.
 
Cancer and Aging Research Group (CARG) at mycarg.org: http://www.mycarg.org/
 

Research Focus

  • Research Focus
     
  • Role of Geriatric Assessment in the care of the older patient with cancer (understanding an individual’s physiologic age verses chronological age) 
     
  • Adjuvant treatment decisions in older patients with breast cancer
     
  • Cognitive effects of cancer therapy in older cancer patients
     
  • Pharmacokinetics of cancer therapy with aging
 

Cancer and Aging Research Program

Cancer and Aging Research Program

The number of older patients with cancer and surviving cancer is rapidly growing because the U.S. population is aging with a projected doubling in the number of patients 65 and older by 2030. Although the majority of cancers occur in older adults, these patients have been under-represented in national cancer clinical trials, which set the standards for oncology care. Few studies have specifically focused on the unique issues which face older adults such as the impact of age related declines in physiology, polypharmacy or comorbid medical conditions on treatment tolerance.
 
Arti Hurria, M.D. leads City of Hope's Cancer and Aging Research Program, the mission of which is to join investigators from all cancer disciplines to study biology, treatment and survivorship issues that face older adults with cancer. The results of this research will be applicable to the majority of patients with cancer because approximately 60 percent of cancer diagnoses and 70 percent of cancer mortality occur in patients over the age of 65.
 
In addition, Hurria established the Cancer and Aging Research Group in order to further research in geriatric oncology. This group is comprised of physicians and researchers across the country who collaborate in many different clinical trials benefiting older adults.
 
Cancer and Aging Research Group (CARG) at mycarg.org: http://www.mycarg.org/
 

Research Focus

Research Focus

  • Research Focus
     
  • Role of Geriatric Assessment in the care of the older patient with cancer (understanding an individual’s physiologic age verses chronological age) 
     
  • Adjuvant treatment decisions in older patients with breast cancer
     
  • Cognitive effects of cancer therapy in older cancer patients
     
  • Pharmacokinetics of cancer therapy with aging
 

Clinical Trials

NEWS & UPDATES
  • Ryan Chavira was a senior in high school when she began feeling sluggish, fatigued and, well, “down.” Trips to the doctor ended in “you’re fine” pronouncements; blood tests results showed nothing of real concern. But Chavira’s grandmother had passed away from ovarian cancer when she was in eig...
  • Brain tumors are exceptionally difficult to treat. They can be removed surgically, but individual cancer cells may have already spread elsewhere in the brain and can escape the effects of both radiation and chemotherapy. To prevent tumors from recurring, doctors need a way to find and stop those invasive cancer...
  • Breast cancer risk is personal; breast cancer risk assessment should be, too. To that end, City of Hope researchers have developed a starting point to help women (and their doctors) with a family history of the disease begin that risk assessment process. The result is an iPhone app, called BRISK, for Breast Can...
  • When it comes to breast cancer, women aren’t limited to getting screened and, if diagnosed, making appropriate treatment choices. They can also take a proactive stance in the fight against breast cancer by understanding key risk factors and practicing lifestyle habits that can help reduce their own breast...
  • Cancers of the blood and immune system are considered to be among the most difficult-to-treat cancers. A world leader in the treatment of blood cancers, City of Hope is now launching an institute specifically focused on treating people with lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma, as well as other serious blood and bone...
  • Genetics, genes, genome, genetic risk … Such terms are becoming increasingly familiar to even nonresearchers as studies and information about the human make-up become more extensive and more critical. At City of Hope, these words have long been part of our vocabulary. Researchers and physicians are studyi...
  • Mammograms are currently the best method to detect breast cancer early, when it’s easier to treat and before it’s big enough to feel or cause symptoms. But recent mammogram screening guidelines may have left some women confused about when to undergo annual testing. Here Lusi Tumyan, M.D., chief of t...
  • Although chemotherapy can be effective in treating cancer, it can also exact a heavy toll on a patient’s health. One impressive alternative researchers have found is in the form of a vaccine. A type of immunotherapy, one part of the vaccine primes the body to react strongly against a tumor; the second part dire...
  • The breast cancer statistic is attention-getting: One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. That doesn’t mean that, if you’re one of eight women at a dinner table, one of you is fated to have breast cancer (read more on that breast cancer statistic), but it does mean that the ...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free. In his first post, ...
  • Advanced age tops the list among breast cancer risk factor for women. Not far behind is family history and genetics. Two City of Hope researchers delving deep into these issues recently received important grants to advance their studies. Arti Hurria, M.D., director of the Cancer and Aging Research Program, and ...
  • City of Hope is extending the reach of its lifesaving mission well beyond U.S. borders. To that end, three distinguished City of Hope leaders visited China earlier this year to lay the foundation for the institution’s new International Medicine Program. The program is part of City of Hope’s strategi...
  • A hallmark of cancer is that it doesn’t always limit itself to a primary location. It spreads. Breast cancer and lung cancer in particular are prone to spread, or metastasize, to the brain. Often the brain metastasis isn’t discovered until years after the initial diagnosis, just when patients were beginning to ...
  • Blueberries, cinnamon, baikal scullcap, grape seed extract (and grape skin extract), mushrooms, barberry, pomegranates … all contain compounds with the potential to treat, or prevent, cancer. Scientists at City of Hope have found tantalizing evidence of this potential and are determined to explore it to t...
  • Most women who are treated for breast cancer with a mastectomy do not choose to undergo reconstructive surgery. The reasons for this, according to a recent JAMA Surgery study, vary. Nearly half say they do not want any additional surgery, while nearly 34 percent say breast cancer reconstruction simply isn’t imp...