A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
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Who We Are

City of Hope is dedicated to making a difference in the lives of people with cancer, diabetes and other serious illnesses. Our mission is to transform the future of health care by turning science into a practical benefit, hope into reality. We accomplish this by providing outstanding care, conducting innovative research and offering vital education programs focused on eliminating these diseases.
 
Founded in 1913, City of Hope is one of only 41 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute. Our role as leaders in patient care, basic and clinical research, and the translation of science into tangible benefit is widely acknowledged.
 
Our community includes research associates, scientists, doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, graduate students, fundraising specialists, marketing professionals, volunteers and an extensive support staff. We are united by our desire to find cures, save lives and transform the future of health. Every discovery we make and every new treatment we create gives people the chance to live longer, better and more fully.
 
City of Hope continues to be a pioneer of patient centered care and remains committed to its tradition of exceptional care for patients, families and communities. Each day, we live out our credo:
 
"There is no profit in curing the body, if, in the process, we destroy the soul."
 

The City of Hope Story

The City of Hope story began in 1913, when a group of volunteers, spurred by compassion to help those afflicted with tuberculosis, established the Jewish Consumptive Relief Association (JCRA) and raised money to start a free, nonsectarian tuberculosis sanatorium.
 
After several fundraisers, the JCRA put a down payment on 10 acres of sun-soaked land in Duarte, where they would establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium a year later. The original sanatorium consisted of two canvas cottages. So was launched a century-long journey that would place City of Hope at the forefront of the nation’s leading medical and research institutions. 
 
By the mid-1940s, thanks to the discovery of antibiotics, tuberculosis was on the decline in the U.S. However, City of Hope rose to the next medical challenge, tackling the catastrophic disease of cancer — and later on, diabetes and HIV/AIDS — while reaffirming its humanitarian vision that “health is a human right.”

In the spirit of that vision, Samuel H. Golter, one of City of Hope’s early leaders, coined the phrase, “There is no profit in curing the body if, in the process, we destroy the soul.” Those words became City of Hope’s credo.
 
Over the decades, research conducted at City of Hope has led to significant advances in modern medicine, including the development of the first synthetic human insulin, human growth hormone and the technology behind the widely used cancer-fighting drugs Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.
 
Today, City of Hope has been designated as a comprehensive cancer center, the highest recognition bestowed by the National Cancer Institute, and is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, with research and treatment protocols that advance care throughout the nation.
 
As we look toward the next 100 years, we continue our mission and commitment to transform the future of medicine. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for countless patients and their loved ones.
 
And our work is just beginning.
 
Historical Milestones
 
1913
The Jewish Consumptive Relief Association was officially incorporated. 10 acres of land were purchased to establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium.

1914
The sanatorium officially opens its doors.  During its first year, it admitted 31 patients.
 
1928
The Jewish Ex-Patients Home, which helps discharged tuberculosis patients with health education, job training and ongoing emotional and spiritual support, merges with the Los Angeles Sanatorium in 1928.
 
1937
The International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union contributes $45,000 toward the construction of the 64-bed Morris Hillquit Memorial Hospital. The finished building is dedicated in 1938, the sanatorium’s 25th anniversary year.
 
1946
With tuberculosis on the wane, Executive Director Samuel L. Golter outlines a plan to transform the sanatorium into a national medical center focused on cancer and other major diseases.
 
1949
The name "City of Hope", used since 1916, is formally adopted, reflecting the institution's broader ambitions.

1952
City of Hope partners with University of California, Los Angeles to establish the Cancer Research Institute on the Duarte campus.

1955
The so-called “cobalt bomb,” a radiation therapy machine developed by City of Hope scientists, is put into operation. The cobalt bomb delivered radiation to malignancies deep within the human body.

1957
The focus on compassionate care reaches new heights with the opening of Hope Village, which provides on-site housing for patients and their families traveling from across the nation.

1965
Executive Director Ben Horowitz unveils a master plan that calls for enlarging patient care, research and medical education facilities. This included expanding research and treatment programs for cancer and other diseases.

1976
The Bone Marrow Transplantation program (BMT) accepts its first patients. The BMT program will grow to become one of the largest and most successful transplantation programs in the country.

1978
Recombinant DNA techniques pioneered by City of Hope scientists lead to the development of synthetic human insulin (Humulin).

1983
The first Beckman Research Institute, a name that would become synonymous with leading-edge research, is established at City of Hope.

1983
Scientists at City of Hope discover how to manufacture immune proteins known as antibodies. This breakthrough leads to humanized monoclonal antibodies — and a new generation of "smart" cancer drugs including Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.

1997
The first Food and Drug Administration-approved human trials of a gene therapy for HIV/AIDS begin. This line of research would lead, in 2011, to the first long-term persistence of anti-HIV genes in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma treated through gene therapy.

1998
The National Cancer Institute designates City of Hope as a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

2000
The Center for Biomedicine & Genetics opens, enabling City of Hope to create biologically based treatments for use in clinical trials. In 2012, a facility producing chemically based drugs would open. These centers, and a complementary third facility, quickly translate discoveries into treatments.

2001
The National Institutes of Health designates City of Hope as an Islet Cell Resource Center.

2003
City of Hope becomes one of the first U.S. medical centers to perform laparoscopic radical prostatectomies to treat prostate cancer.

2005
The Helford Clinical Research Hospital opens, replacing Hillquit Hospital. The Helford Hospital maximizes the human side of patient care and significantly increases City of Hope’s capacity for surgical procedures and programs such as the BMT.

2008
Scientists at City of Hope begin the first in-human clinical trials of RNA-based gene therapy for HIV-related illnesses.

2010
The City of Hope Medical Foundation is established.

2011
City of Hope reaches its milestone 10,000th bone marrow transplant, becoming one of the largest and most successful transplant programs of its kind in the world.

2013
City of Hope celebrates its 100th anniversary.
 

Culture/Values

Our Mission:
City of Hope is transforming the future of health. Every day we turn science into practical benefit. We turn hope into reality. We accomplish this through exquisite care, innovative research and vital education focused on eliminating cancer and diabetes.
 
Our Values:
COMPASSION
From day one, compassion has been woven into the heart and soul of our institution.
Compassion for our patients, their families, and our team members.
 
We show compassion not only through treatment, but also through our philanthropy and advocacy, through our humanistic approach to research and care and through our day-to-day relationships with every individual.
 
We demonstrate compassion for our peers and colleagues by showing empathy and treating each other with dignity and respect.
 
SERVICE WITH A SENSE OF URGENCY
We focus on turning great science into practical benefit as quickly as possible.
 
We tenaciously pursue new and better ways to improve the lives of people around the world. We are driven to provide new treatments for more people every day.
 
Our passion for serving others extends to our own people. We believe that providing opportunities to our own team members to engage and build community with colleagues helps them work more effectively.
 
INTEGRITY
We choose the right path, not the easy one.
 
We promote a “just culture” environment that requires each of us to do the right thing to ensure patient safety. We do what’s best for our patients and our community, every moment of every day.
 
Integrity guides us to passionately engage in our work, step up to every challenge and conduct our business with transparency. We hold ourselves accountable for following through with our commitments and doing the right thing.

INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY
Our reputation for scientific excellence stems from our determination to aggressively pursue new lines of inquiry.
 
We are lifelong learners committed to making pioneering discoveries and moving them forward for the benefit of patients and the scientific community worldwide. Our curiosity has fueled our innovation, creating life-changing moments and lifesaving breakthroughs, like developing the first synthetic human insulin and numerous cancer-fighting drugs.
 
EXCELLENCE
Our commitment to advancing science while providing compassionate care has established us as the benchmark in fighting cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.
 
We strive for excellence in our processes and outcomes without compromising safety. We encourage every individual to use their best judgment, achieve synergies and make decisions that align with our mission, values and worldwide reputation for excellence.
 
COLLABORATION
We work as one team, united by a common purpose. We are a community of experts, combining the resources of cutting-edge scientific research, drug manufacturing, clinical care, graduate education, philanthropy and supportive care services.
 
Recognizing the value that bringing together diverse perspectives provides, we create an environment where new partnerships thrive, where barriers to freely sharing knowledge do not exist and where the right stakeholders are engaged from the beginning.
 

Our Next 100 Years

At City of Hope, our mission and commitment to transform the future of health is based on our past success at doing just that. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for thousands of patients and families. And our work is just beginning.
 
As we look ahead, our strategic plan will provide the focus necessary to uniquely attack life-threatening diseases. We’ll retain our innovative nimbleness to quickly advance the most promising areas of research, while retaining our commitment to the exquisite care of our patients and families.
 
Events and collaborations like Concert for Hope, Walk for Hope and ThinkCure! will enable us to extend our mission to younger generations, ensuring an ongoing legacy of diverse and committed supporters ready to move us forward into our second century of Hope.
 

Diversity and Inclusion

At City of Hope, we strive to create an inclusive environment that engages all of our employees and provides them with opportunities to develop and grow, both personally and professionally.
 
Each day brings an opportunity to strengthen our work, leverage our unique perspectives and improve our patients' experiences by learning from others.
 
We invite you to learn more about our commitment to diversity and inclusion. Click here to download our brochure.

Who We Are

Who We Are

City of Hope is dedicated to making a difference in the lives of people with cancer, diabetes and other serious illnesses. Our mission is to transform the future of health care by turning science into a practical benefit, hope into reality. We accomplish this by providing outstanding care, conducting innovative research and offering vital education programs focused on eliminating these diseases.
 
Founded in 1913, City of Hope is one of only 41 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute. Our role as leaders in patient care, basic and clinical research, and the translation of science into tangible benefit is widely acknowledged.
 
Our community includes research associates, scientists, doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, graduate students, fundraising specialists, marketing professionals, volunteers and an extensive support staff. We are united by our desire to find cures, save lives and transform the future of health. Every discovery we make and every new treatment we create gives people the chance to live longer, better and more fully.
 
City of Hope continues to be a pioneer of patient centered care and remains committed to its tradition of exceptional care for patients, families and communities. Each day, we live out our credo:
 
"There is no profit in curing the body, if, in the process, we destroy the soul."
 

100 Year Legacy

The City of Hope Story

The City of Hope story began in 1913, when a group of volunteers, spurred by compassion to help those afflicted with tuberculosis, established the Jewish Consumptive Relief Association (JCRA) and raised money to start a free, nonsectarian tuberculosis sanatorium.
 
After several fundraisers, the JCRA put a down payment on 10 acres of sun-soaked land in Duarte, where they would establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium a year later. The original sanatorium consisted of two canvas cottages. So was launched a century-long journey that would place City of Hope at the forefront of the nation’s leading medical and research institutions. 
 
By the mid-1940s, thanks to the discovery of antibiotics, tuberculosis was on the decline in the U.S. However, City of Hope rose to the next medical challenge, tackling the catastrophic disease of cancer — and later on, diabetes and HIV/AIDS — while reaffirming its humanitarian vision that “health is a human right.”

In the spirit of that vision, Samuel H. Golter, one of City of Hope’s early leaders, coined the phrase, “There is no profit in curing the body if, in the process, we destroy the soul.” Those words became City of Hope’s credo.
 
Over the decades, research conducted at City of Hope has led to significant advances in modern medicine, including the development of the first synthetic human insulin, human growth hormone and the technology behind the widely used cancer-fighting drugs Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.
 
Today, City of Hope has been designated as a comprehensive cancer center, the highest recognition bestowed by the National Cancer Institute, and is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, with research and treatment protocols that advance care throughout the nation.
 
As we look toward the next 100 years, we continue our mission and commitment to transform the future of medicine. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for countless patients and their loved ones.
 
And our work is just beginning.
 
Historical Milestones
 
1913
The Jewish Consumptive Relief Association was officially incorporated. 10 acres of land were purchased to establish the Los Angeles Sanatorium.

1914
The sanatorium officially opens its doors.  During its first year, it admitted 31 patients.
 
1928
The Jewish Ex-Patients Home, which helps discharged tuberculosis patients with health education, job training and ongoing emotional and spiritual support, merges with the Los Angeles Sanatorium in 1928.
 
1937
The International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union contributes $45,000 toward the construction of the 64-bed Morris Hillquit Memorial Hospital. The finished building is dedicated in 1938, the sanatorium’s 25th anniversary year.
 
1946
With tuberculosis on the wane, Executive Director Samuel L. Golter outlines a plan to transform the sanatorium into a national medical center focused on cancer and other major diseases.
 
1949
The name "City of Hope", used since 1916, is formally adopted, reflecting the institution's broader ambitions.

1952
City of Hope partners with University of California, Los Angeles to establish the Cancer Research Institute on the Duarte campus.

1955
The so-called “cobalt bomb,” a radiation therapy machine developed by City of Hope scientists, is put into operation. The cobalt bomb delivered radiation to malignancies deep within the human body.

1957
The focus on compassionate care reaches new heights with the opening of Hope Village, which provides on-site housing for patients and their families traveling from across the nation.

1965
Executive Director Ben Horowitz unveils a master plan that calls for enlarging patient care, research and medical education facilities. This included expanding research and treatment programs for cancer and other diseases.

1976
The Bone Marrow Transplantation program (BMT) accepts its first patients. The BMT program will grow to become one of the largest and most successful transplantation programs in the country.

1978
Recombinant DNA techniques pioneered by City of Hope scientists lead to the development of synthetic human insulin (Humulin).

1983
The first Beckman Research Institute, a name that would become synonymous with leading-edge research, is established at City of Hope.

1983
Scientists at City of Hope discover how to manufacture immune proteins known as antibodies. This breakthrough leads to humanized monoclonal antibodies — and a new generation of "smart" cancer drugs including Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin.

1997
The first Food and Drug Administration-approved human trials of a gene therapy for HIV/AIDS begin. This line of research would lead, in 2011, to the first long-term persistence of anti-HIV genes in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma treated through gene therapy.

1998
The National Cancer Institute designates City of Hope as a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

2000
The Center for Biomedicine & Genetics opens, enabling City of Hope to create biologically based treatments for use in clinical trials. In 2012, a facility producing chemically based drugs would open. These centers, and a complementary third facility, quickly translate discoveries into treatments.

2001
The National Institutes of Health designates City of Hope as an Islet Cell Resource Center.

2003
City of Hope becomes one of the first U.S. medical centers to perform laparoscopic radical prostatectomies to treat prostate cancer.

2005
The Helford Clinical Research Hospital opens, replacing Hillquit Hospital. The Helford Hospital maximizes the human side of patient care and significantly increases City of Hope’s capacity for surgical procedures and programs such as the BMT.

2008
Scientists at City of Hope begin the first in-human clinical trials of RNA-based gene therapy for HIV-related illnesses.

2010
The City of Hope Medical Foundation is established.

2011
City of Hope reaches its milestone 10,000th bone marrow transplant, becoming one of the largest and most successful transplant programs of its kind in the world.

2013
City of Hope celebrates its 100th anniversary.
 

Culture/Values

Culture/Values

Our Mission:
City of Hope is transforming the future of health. Every day we turn science into practical benefit. We turn hope into reality. We accomplish this through exquisite care, innovative research and vital education focused on eliminating cancer and diabetes.
 
Our Values:
COMPASSION
From day one, compassion has been woven into the heart and soul of our institution.
Compassion for our patients, their families, and our team members.
 
We show compassion not only through treatment, but also through our philanthropy and advocacy, through our humanistic approach to research and care and through our day-to-day relationships with every individual.
 
We demonstrate compassion for our peers and colleagues by showing empathy and treating each other with dignity and respect.
 
SERVICE WITH A SENSE OF URGENCY
We focus on turning great science into practical benefit as quickly as possible.
 
We tenaciously pursue new and better ways to improve the lives of people around the world. We are driven to provide new treatments for more people every day.
 
Our passion for serving others extends to our own people. We believe that providing opportunities to our own team members to engage and build community with colleagues helps them work more effectively.
 
INTEGRITY
We choose the right path, not the easy one.
 
We promote a “just culture” environment that requires each of us to do the right thing to ensure patient safety. We do what’s best for our patients and our community, every moment of every day.
 
Integrity guides us to passionately engage in our work, step up to every challenge and conduct our business with transparency. We hold ourselves accountable for following through with our commitments and doing the right thing.

INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY
Our reputation for scientific excellence stems from our determination to aggressively pursue new lines of inquiry.
 
We are lifelong learners committed to making pioneering discoveries and moving them forward for the benefit of patients and the scientific community worldwide. Our curiosity has fueled our innovation, creating life-changing moments and lifesaving breakthroughs, like developing the first synthetic human insulin and numerous cancer-fighting drugs.
 
EXCELLENCE
Our commitment to advancing science while providing compassionate care has established us as the benchmark in fighting cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.
 
We strive for excellence in our processes and outcomes without compromising safety. We encourage every individual to use their best judgment, achieve synergies and make decisions that align with our mission, values and worldwide reputation for excellence.
 
COLLABORATION
We work as one team, united by a common purpose. We are a community of experts, combining the resources of cutting-edge scientific research, drug manufacturing, clinical care, graduate education, philanthropy and supportive care services.
 
Recognizing the value that bringing together diverse perspectives provides, we create an environment where new partnerships thrive, where barriers to freely sharing knowledge do not exist and where the right stakeholders are engaged from the beginning.
 

Our Next 100 Years

Our Next 100 Years

At City of Hope, our mission and commitment to transform the future of health is based on our past success at doing just that. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for thousands of patients and families. And our work is just beginning.
 
As we look ahead, our strategic plan will provide the focus necessary to uniquely attack life-threatening diseases. We’ll retain our innovative nimbleness to quickly advance the most promising areas of research, while retaining our commitment to the exquisite care of our patients and families.
 
Events and collaborations like Concert for Hope, Walk for Hope and ThinkCure! will enable us to extend our mission to younger generations, ensuring an ongoing legacy of diverse and committed supporters ready to move us forward into our second century of Hope.
 

Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion

At City of Hope, we strive to create an inclusive environment that engages all of our employees and provides them with opportunities to develop and grow, both personally and professionally.
 
Each day brings an opportunity to strengthen our work, leverage our unique perspectives and improve our patients' experiences by learning from others.
 
We invite you to learn more about our commitment to diversity and inclusion. Click here to download our brochure.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
City of Hope is a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background, and approach, but tied together by our commitment to care for and cure those with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Download our Diversity & Inclusion brochure.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Surgery for head and neck cancers is unarguably complex, requiring extremely controlled movements and exceptional training. “Given where we are operating, our primary concern is maintaining speaking, swallowing and breathing,” said Ellie Maghami, M.D., chief of head and neck surgery, who recently teamed with Ro...
  • Henry Ford said it well: “Working together is success.” For biomedical researchers, this is especially true. The challenges they face often require expertise from multiple fields to find answers and solutions. Scientists seeking cures for type 1 diabetes in particular must overcome biological, medical and techn...
  • Superheroes are making plenty of headlines as the summer blockbuster season opens. At City of Hope, a 9-year-old girl wept as she hugged her own superhero: someone who had the superpower of healing her cancer. He didn’t wear flashy armor or a cape, but rather a plaid shirt. He doesn’t have a secret ...
  • Known for his ability to bring together, and lead, effective research teams, world-renowned translational research scientist and physician Larry W. Kwak, M.D., Ph.D., has joined City of Hope in a key leadership role within the institution’s new Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Instit...
  • To detect melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, at its earliest, most treatable stage, conduct a head-to-toe skin self-examination once a month to check for suspicious moles.   Unusual, or atypical, moles can ultimately develop into skin cancer. Here is the ABCDE guide to potentially cancerous mol...
  • “Superheroes,” “grateful” and “lifesavers”: All are words patients have used to describe their bone marrow donors. For donors, “a great feeling” and “the right thing to do” seems to sum up their view of donating the stem cells used to save someone’s life. Bone marrow transplants of...
  • Updated: May 1, 2015 More than a decade after joining the bone marrow registry during a blood drive at the United States Military Academy at West Point, Phil Ratcliff received a call that he was a match for a leukemia patient. By then, he’d left his military career to start his own financial business, married [...
  • Updated: May 1. For Lars Nijland, the reason to become a member of a bone marrow registry was simple. “I always thought there would be no easier way to save somebody’s life,” said the 24-year-old student at Germany’s University of Goettingen, who signed up for the registry during a drive on his campus. Ni...
  • Updated: May 1 No parent ever wants to see their child hurting or sick in any way. Joanne Cooper’s daughter Amanda wasn’t sick, though. She seemed healthy. Vibrant. A straight-A student whose only major health ailment had been bouts of stress-related nausea. Then a blood test revealed that Amanda – now 9 years ...
  • Noe Chavez became animated when he recalled the story: “We were running a health event, screening folks for diabetes,” said the enthusiastic City of Hope population health researcher, “and this man comes over and starts talking to us about the trouble he’s having with his eyes. I spoke with him, listened ...
  • When Keith McKinny, 29, was first diagnosed with lymphoma and leukemia in 2010, the first person he thought of was former boyfriend Jason Mullins. The two hadn’t been in contact with each other for some time, but McKinny couldn’t think of anyone else with whom he wanted to be during that difficult period....
  • Updated: May 1 Yesenia Portillo’s search for a bone marrow donor started close to home. Her brother, sister and seven cousins all underwent testing, but none of them were a close enough match to donate the bone marrow stem cells she desperately needed for her transplant. Yesenia, now almost 16, had always been ...
  • Some of City of Hope’s most high-impact achievements have arisen from City of Hope’s globally recognized bone marrow transplant (BMT) program. The annual Karl G. Blume – Gerhard Schmidt Memorial Lecture in Transplantation Biology & Medicine — commemorating two of the most influential and revered...
  • Guido Marcucci, M.D., wants to put himself out of business. A respected clinician and esteemed basic and translational scientist, Marcucci joins City of Hope as co-director of the Gehr Family Center for Leukemia Research within the Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute. In this positi...
  • To say that myelofibrosis patients need more treatment options would be an understatement. The severely low platelet counts, known as thrombocytopenia, that are one of the hallmark symptoms of the disease can lead to chronic fatigue and weakness that not only damage quality of life but, ultimately, shorten life...