A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE

Who We Are

Our Story
City of Hope is a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach, joined together by a common purpose. A place where scientists collaborate with caregivers and discovery blends with compassion.
 
Our community includes research associates, scientists, doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, graduate students, fundraising specialists, marketing professionals, volunteers and an extensive support staff.
 
Together, we are champions of humanity. We are united by our desire to find cures, save lives and transform the future of health. Every discovery we make and every new treatment we create gives people the chance to live longer, better and more fully.
 
City of Hope is recognized worldwide for compassionate patient care, innovative science and translational research, which rapidly turn laboratory breakthroughs into promising new therapies. Everything we do is grounded in our passion for delivering hope in the global fight against cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.
 
Our story began in 1913, when a dedicated group of men and women came together to form the Jewish Consumptive Relief Association of California, a free, national and nonsectarian tuberculosis sanatorium. The facility was nicknamed “the city of hope.”
 

100 Year Legacy

By the mid-1940s, tuberculosis was on the decline in the U.S. but the organization that became City of Hope rose to the challenge of each successive era, tackling the world’s most catastrophic diseases while reaffirming its humanitarian vision that “health is a human right.”
 
One of City of Hope’s early leaders, Samuel H. Golter, coined the phrase, “There is no profit in curing the body if, in the process, we destroy the soul.” Those words became City of Hope’s unofficial credo.
 
Over the years, research conducted at City of Hope has led to significant advances in modern medicine. From the development of the first synthetic human insulin and human growth hormone to widely used cancer fighting drugs, Herceptin, Rituxan and Avastin, we are leading the fight to conquer cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases.
 
Research developed by immunologist Charles Todd, Ph.D., was critical to City of Hope’s first designation from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a specialized cancer research center. In 1998, the NCI upgraded City of Hope to a comprehensive cancer center.
 

Culture/Values

Our Mission:
City of Hope is transforming the future of health. Every day we turn science into practical benefit. We turn hope into reality. We accomplish this through exquisite care, innovative research and vital education focused on eliminating cancer and diabetes.
 
Our Values:
COMPASSION
From day one, compassion has been woven into the heart and soul of our institution.
Compassion for our patients, their families, and our team members.
 
We show compassion not only through treatment, but also through our philanthropy and advocacy, through our humanistic approach to research and care and through our day-to-day relationships with every individual.
 
We demonstrate compassion for our peers and colleagues by showing empathy and treating each other with dignity and respect.
 
SERVICE WITH A SENSE OF URGENCY
We focus on turning great science into practical benefit as quickly as possible.
 
We tenaciously pursue new and better ways to improve the lives of people around the world. We are driven to provide new treatments for more people every day.
 
Our passion for serving others extends to our own people. We believe that providing opportunities to our own team members to engage and build community with colleagues helps them work more effectively.
 
INTEGRITY
We choose the right path, not the easy one.
 
We promote a “just culture” environment that requires each of us to do the right thing to ensure patient safety. We do what’s best for our patients and our community, every moment of every day.
 
Integrity guides us to passionately engage in our work, step up to every challenge and conduct our business with transparency. We hold ourselves accountable for following through with our commitments and doing the right thing.

INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY
Our reputation for scientific excellence stems from our determination to aggressively pursue new lines of inquiry.
 
We are lifelong learners committed to making pioneering discoveries and moving them forward for the benefit of patients and the scientific community worldwide. Our curiosity has fueled our innovation, creating life-changing moments and lifesaving breakthroughs, like developing the first synthetic human insulin and numerous cancer-fighting drugs.
 
EXCELLENCE
Our commitment to advancing science while providing compassionate care has established us as the benchmark in fighting cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.
 
We strive for excellence in our processes and outcomes without compromising safety. We encourage every individual to use their best judgment, achieve synergies and make decisions that align with our mission, values and worldwide reputation for excellence.
 
COLLABORATION
We work as one team, united by a common purpose. We are a community of experts, combining the resources of cutting-edge scientific research, drug manufacturing, clinical care, graduate education, philanthropy and supportive care services.
 
Recognizing the value that bringing together diverse perspectives provides, we create an environment where new partnerships thrive, where barriers to freely sharing knowledge do not exist and where the right stakeholders are engaged from the beginning.
 

Our Next 100 Years

At City of Hope, our mission and commitment to transform the future of health is based on our past success at doing just that. Our researchers, physicians, nurses, educators and staff have made hope a reality for thousands of patients and families. And our work is just beginning.
 
As we look ahead, our strategic plan will provide the focus necessary to uniquely attack life-threatening diseases. We’ll retain our innovative nimbleness to quickly advance the most promising areas of research, while retaining our commitment to the exquisite care of our patients and families.
 
Events and collaborations like Concert for Hope, Walk for Hope and ThinkCure! will enable us to extend our mission to younger generations, ensuring an ongoing legacy of diverse and committed supporters ready to move us forward into our second century of Hope.
 

Diversity and Inclusion

At City of Hope, we strive to create an inclusive environment that engages all of our employees and provides them with opportunities to develop and grow, both personally and professionally.
 
Each day brings an opportunity to strengthen our work, leverage our unique perspectives and improve our patients' experiences by learning from others.
 
We invite you to learn more about our commitment to diversity and inclusion. Click here to download our brochure.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Meet City of Hope’s new chair of the Department of Surgery – esteemed pancreatic and hepatobiliary surgeon, researcher and author Yuman Fong, M.D. As one of today’s most respected and recognizable physicians in the treatment of cancers of the liver, bile duct, gallbladder and pancreas, Fong has pioneered and en...
  • For most of her life, Southern California teenager Kayla Saikaly described herself as healthy, even very healthy. She played basketball. She never missed school with as much as a fever. Her worst childhood illness was nothing more than a cold. Then, when she was 13, her nose started bleeding after a basketball ...
  • Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today. But those odds may improve soon, thanks to a new comp...
  • For breast cancer survivors, a common worry is a recurrence of their cancer. Currently, these patients are screened with regular mammograms, but there’s no way to tell who is more likely to have a recurrence and who is fully cleared of her cancer. A new blood test – reported in Cancer Research, a journal of the...
  • Metastasis — the spreading of cancer cells from a primary tumor site to other parts of the body — generally leads to poorer outcomes for patients, so oncologists and researchers are constantly seeking new ways to detect and thwart this malicious process. Now City of Hope researchers may have identified a substa...
  • Deodorant, plastic bottles, grilled foods, artificial sweeteners, soy products … Do any of these products really cause cancer? With so many cancer myths and urban legends out there, why not ask the experts? They can debunk cancer myths while sharing cancer facts that matter, such as risk factors, preventi...
  • Cancer risk varies by ethnicity, as does the risk of cancer-related death. But the size of those differences can be surprising, highlighting the health disparities that exist among various ethnic groups in the United States. Both cancer incidence and death rates for men are highest among African-Americans, acco...
  • George Winston, known worldwide for his impressionistic, genre-defying music, considers music to be his first language, and admits he often stumbles over words – especially when he attempts languages other than English. There’s one German phrase he’s determined to perfect, however: danke schön. Winston thinks h...
  • Few decisions are more important than those involving health care, and few decisions can have such lasting impact, not only on oneself but on relatives and loved ones. Those choices, especially, should be made in advance – carefully, deliberately, free of pain and stress, and with much weighing of values and pr...
  • Using a card game to make decisions about health care, especially as those decisions relate to the end of life, would seem to be a poor idea. It isn’t. The GoWish Game makes those overwhelming, but all-important decisions not just easy, but natural. On each card of the 36-card deck is listed what seriously ill,...
  • Young adults and adolescents with cancer face unique challenges both during their treatment and afterward. Not only are therapies for children and older adults not always appropriate for them, they also must come to terms with the disease and treatment’s impact on their relationships, finances, school or ...
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer, other than skin cancer, among women in the United States. It’s also the second-leading cause of cancer death, behind lung cancer. In the past several years, various task force recommendations and studies have questioned the benefits of broad screening guidelines fo...
  • Paternal age and the health effects it has on potential offspring have been the focus of many studies, but few have examined the effect parental age has on the risk of adult-onset hormone-related cancers (breast cancer, ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer). A team of City of Hope researchers, lead by Yani Lu,...
  • Hormone therapy, which is prescribed to women for relief of menopausal symptoms such hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness, has recently seen a decline in popularity (and use) due to its link to an increased risk of breast and endometrial cancer. But City of Hope researchers have found that menopausal h...
  • Myeloproliferative neoplasms can’t be narrowed down to a single cancer, but they can be described by a defining characteristic: too many blood cells. The diseases bring with them a host of frustrating, potentially life-altering symptoms, and management of the diseases and their symptoms is crucial. An upcoming ...