A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Programs

CCARE joins a multi-sectorial team representing advocacy groups, community organizations, faith-based organizations, academic institutions, health services organizations, the public and private sector, and policymakers. In collaboration with our 188 community partners, we provide educational workshops, materials and demonstrations as well as screening for early detection and disease prevention (e.g., diabetes, hypertension and breast-, cervical- and prostate cancers). CCARE also partners with community organizations including the American Cancer Society to implement health promotion, cancer prevention and early detection programs to respond to the needs of our diverse community. Since the inception of the CCARE program, thousands of people (predominantly African-American, Asian-American, and Latino-American) have participated in our community education events. Attendees reported increased knowledge about cancer risk reduction and awareness of community cancer resources
 
Community Health Promotion Activities

“Eat, Move, Live!”
This community collaborative program links City of Hope with cities and school districts to implement an obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases prevention program via culturally and linguistically appropriate nutrition and exercise classes for children and their parents, in a local school setting.
Over the years, the "Eat, Move, Live!" lifestyle intervention program has demonstrated success in increasing knowledge and practice of health behaviors among both adults and children.
  • Children demonstrated increased knowledge of food groups and health behaviors.
  • Parents demonstrated significant increases in knowledge and behavior by increasing daily servings of fruit and vegetables and daily physical activity.
  • Justifications provided by parents for not engaging in health behaviors (e.g., healthy eating) at pre-test were areas that were address by this series.
At the end of this class series, all participants reported they planned to use the healthy lifestyle changes they learned.
For more information on the "Eat, Move, Live!" program, and additional resources, click here.
 
Cancer Equity Forum
In honor of Minority Cancer Awareness Week, City of Hope hosts this special event on the third week of April, every year. Read more in Professional Development.

Cancer Screenings and Health Fairs
To address disparities, CCARE partners with community leaders in the greater Los Angeles and the Inland Empire areas to produce a series of health fairs and cancer screening events tailored to specific demographic groups. For all screening events, in addition to the diagnostic screenings, CCARE collaborates with community partners to present educational and demonstration workshops on health promotion and disease prevention. Lifesaving health screenings, e.g. diabetes and blood pressure tests, and cancer screenings, e.g., Pap smears, mammograms, and PSA tests are provided to attendees who have limited access to them elsewhere. Educational presentations, demonstrations, and healthy food samples augment the screenings in a fun “health fair” environment:
 
  • “Mejor Salud, Mejor Vida” Villa-Parke Community Center, Pasadena, California. This event featured information and lectures in Spanish on cancer, diabetes and nutrition.
  • A.K.A. Sorority Health Summit Health and educational services for the African American community.
  • Celebration of Life, Chinese Cancer Survivor Conference The focus of this conference, conducted in Mandarin, was to address health-related quality of life issues among Chinese cancer survivors.
  • LULAC: Latinos Living Healthy Feria de Salud Tens of thousands gathered on Olvera Street, in Los Angeles, for the free health screenings, entertainment, and games at the LULAC Feria de Salud. Read more here. Watch footage here.
 
To invite a speaker, please Contact Us to learn more about how we can come share with your local community!
 
 

 
 
 
 

Programs & Initiatives

Programs

CCARE joins a multi-sectorial team representing advocacy groups, community organizations, faith-based organizations, academic institutions, health services organizations, the public and private sector, and policymakers. In collaboration with our 188 community partners, we provide educational workshops, materials and demonstrations as well as screening for early detection and disease prevention (e.g., diabetes, hypertension and breast-, cervical- and prostate cancers). CCARE also partners with community organizations including the American Cancer Society to implement health promotion, cancer prevention and early detection programs to respond to the needs of our diverse community. Since the inception of the CCARE program, thousands of people (predominantly African-American, Asian-American, and Latino-American) have participated in our community education events. Attendees reported increased knowledge about cancer risk reduction and awareness of community cancer resources
 
Community Health Promotion Activities

“Eat, Move, Live!”
This community collaborative program links City of Hope with cities and school districts to implement an obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases prevention program via culturally and linguistically appropriate nutrition and exercise classes for children and their parents, in a local school setting.
Over the years, the "Eat, Move, Live!" lifestyle intervention program has demonstrated success in increasing knowledge and practice of health behaviors among both adults and children.
  • Children demonstrated increased knowledge of food groups and health behaviors.
  • Parents demonstrated significant increases in knowledge and behavior by increasing daily servings of fruit and vegetables and daily physical activity.
  • Justifications provided by parents for not engaging in health behaviors (e.g., healthy eating) at pre-test were areas that were address by this series.
At the end of this class series, all participants reported they planned to use the healthy lifestyle changes they learned.
For more information on the "Eat, Move, Live!" program, and additional resources, click here.
 
Cancer Equity Forum
In honor of Minority Cancer Awareness Week, City of Hope hosts this special event on the third week of April, every year. Read more in Professional Development.

Cancer Screenings and Health Fairs
To address disparities, CCARE partners with community leaders in the greater Los Angeles and the Inland Empire areas to produce a series of health fairs and cancer screening events tailored to specific demographic groups. For all screening events, in addition to the diagnostic screenings, CCARE collaborates with community partners to present educational and demonstration workshops on health promotion and disease prevention. Lifesaving health screenings, e.g. diabetes and blood pressure tests, and cancer screenings, e.g., Pap smears, mammograms, and PSA tests are provided to attendees who have limited access to them elsewhere. Educational presentations, demonstrations, and healthy food samples augment the screenings in a fun “health fair” environment:
 
  • “Mejor Salud, Mejor Vida” Villa-Parke Community Center, Pasadena, California. This event featured information and lectures in Spanish on cancer, diabetes and nutrition.
  • A.K.A. Sorority Health Summit Health and educational services for the African American community.
  • Celebration of Life, Chinese Cancer Survivor Conference The focus of this conference, conducted in Mandarin, was to address health-related quality of life issues among Chinese cancer survivors.
  • LULAC: Latinos Living Healthy Feria de Salud Tens of thousands gathered on Olvera Street, in Los Angeles, for the free health screenings, entertainment, and games at the LULAC Feria de Salud. Read more here. Watch footage here.
 
To invite a speaker, please Contact Us to learn more about how we can come share with your local community!
 
 

 
 
 
 
Overview
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.
 
 
Research Departments/Divisions

City of Hope is a leader in translational research - integrating basic science, clinical research and patient care.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 


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