A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Programs

CCARE joins a multi-sectorial team representing advocacy groups, community organizations, faith-based organizations, academic institutions, health services organizations, the public and private sector, and policymakers. In collaboration with our 188 community partners, we provide educational workshops, materials and demonstrations as well as screening for early detection and disease prevention (e.g., diabetes, hypertension and breast-, cervical- and prostate cancers). CCARE also partners with community organizations including the American Cancer Society to implement health promotion, cancer prevention and early detection programs to respond to the needs of our diverse community. Since the inception of the CCARE program, thousands of people (predominantly African-American, Asian-American, and Latino-American) have participated in our community education events. Attendees reported increased knowledge about cancer risk reduction and awareness of community cancer resources
 
Community Health Promotion Activities

“Eat, Move, Live!”
This community collaborative program links City of Hope with cities and school districts to implement an obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases prevention program via culturally and linguistically appropriate nutrition and exercise classes for children and their parents, in a local school setting.
Over the years, the "Eat, Move, Live!" lifestyle intervention program has demonstrated success in increasing knowledge and practice of health behaviors among both adults and children.
  • Children demonstrated increased knowledge of food groups and health behaviors.
  • Parents demonstrated significant increases in knowledge and behavior by increasing daily servings of fruit and vegetables and daily physical activity.
  • Justifications provided by parents for not engaging in health behaviors (e.g., healthy eating) at pre-test were areas that were address by this series.
At the end of this class series, all participants reported they planned to use the healthy lifestyle changes they learned.
For more information on the "Eat, Move, Live!" program, and additional resources, click here.
 
Cancer Equity Forum
In honor of Minority Cancer Awareness Week, City of Hope hosts this special event on the third week of April, every year. Read more in Professional Development.

Cancer Screenings and Health Fairs
To address disparities, CCARE partners with community leaders in the greater Los Angeles and the Inland Empire areas to produce a series of health fairs and cancer screening events tailored to specific demographic groups. For all screening events, in addition to the diagnostic screenings, CCARE collaborates with community partners to present educational and demonstration workshops on health promotion and disease prevention. Lifesaving health screenings, e.g. diabetes and blood pressure tests, and cancer screenings, e.g., Pap smears, mammograms, and PSA tests are provided to attendees who have limited access to them elsewhere. Educational presentations, demonstrations, and healthy food samples augment the screenings in a fun “health fair” environment:
 
  • “Mejor Salud, Mejor Vida” Villa-Parke Community Center, Pasadena, California. This event featured information and lectures in Spanish on cancer, diabetes and nutrition.
  • A.K.A. Sorority Health Summit Health and educational services for the African American community.
  • Celebration of Life, Chinese Cancer Survivor Conference The focus of this conference, conducted in Mandarin, was to address health-related quality of life issues among Chinese cancer survivors.
  • LULAC: Latinos Living Healthy Feria de Salud Tens of thousands gathered on Olvera Street, in Los Angeles, for the free health screenings, entertainment, and games at the LULAC Feria de Salud. Read more here. Watch footage here.
 
To invite a speaker, please Contact Us to learn more about how we can come share with your local community!
 
 

 
 
 
 

Programs & Initiatives

Programs

CCARE joins a multi-sectorial team representing advocacy groups, community organizations, faith-based organizations, academic institutions, health services organizations, the public and private sector, and policymakers. In collaboration with our 188 community partners, we provide educational workshops, materials and demonstrations as well as screening for early detection and disease prevention (e.g., diabetes, hypertension and breast-, cervical- and prostate cancers). CCARE also partners with community organizations including the American Cancer Society to implement health promotion, cancer prevention and early detection programs to respond to the needs of our diverse community. Since the inception of the CCARE program, thousands of people (predominantly African-American, Asian-American, and Latino-American) have participated in our community education events. Attendees reported increased knowledge about cancer risk reduction and awareness of community cancer resources
 
Community Health Promotion Activities

“Eat, Move, Live!”
This community collaborative program links City of Hope with cities and school districts to implement an obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases prevention program via culturally and linguistically appropriate nutrition and exercise classes for children and their parents, in a local school setting.
Over the years, the "Eat, Move, Live!" lifestyle intervention program has demonstrated success in increasing knowledge and practice of health behaviors among both adults and children.
  • Children demonstrated increased knowledge of food groups and health behaviors.
  • Parents demonstrated significant increases in knowledge and behavior by increasing daily servings of fruit and vegetables and daily physical activity.
  • Justifications provided by parents for not engaging in health behaviors (e.g., healthy eating) at pre-test were areas that were address by this series.
At the end of this class series, all participants reported they planned to use the healthy lifestyle changes they learned.
For more information on the "Eat, Move, Live!" program, and additional resources, click here.
 
Cancer Equity Forum
In honor of Minority Cancer Awareness Week, City of Hope hosts this special event on the third week of April, every year. Read more in Professional Development.

Cancer Screenings and Health Fairs
To address disparities, CCARE partners with community leaders in the greater Los Angeles and the Inland Empire areas to produce a series of health fairs and cancer screening events tailored to specific demographic groups. For all screening events, in addition to the diagnostic screenings, CCARE collaborates with community partners to present educational and demonstration workshops on health promotion and disease prevention. Lifesaving health screenings, e.g. diabetes and blood pressure tests, and cancer screenings, e.g., Pap smears, mammograms, and PSA tests are provided to attendees who have limited access to them elsewhere. Educational presentations, demonstrations, and healthy food samples augment the screenings in a fun “health fair” environment:
 
  • “Mejor Salud, Mejor Vida” Villa-Parke Community Center, Pasadena, California. This event featured information and lectures in Spanish on cancer, diabetes and nutrition.
  • A.K.A. Sorority Health Summit Health and educational services for the African American community.
  • Celebration of Life, Chinese Cancer Survivor Conference The focus of this conference, conducted in Mandarin, was to address health-related quality of life issues among Chinese cancer survivors.
  • LULAC: Latinos Living Healthy Feria de Salud Tens of thousands gathered on Olvera Street, in Los Angeles, for the free health screenings, entertainment, and games at the LULAC Feria de Salud. Read more here. Watch footage here.
 
To invite a speaker, please Contact Us to learn more about how we can come share with your local community!
 
 

 
 
 
 
Overview
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.
 
 
Research Departments/Divisions

City of Hope is a leader in translational research - integrating basic science, clinical research and patient care.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Cancer treatments have improved over the years, but one potential source of treatments and cures remains largely untapped: nature. Blueberries, cinnamon, xinfeng, grape seed (and skin) extract, mushrooms, barberry and pomegranates all contain compounds with the potential to treat or prevent cancer. Scientists a...
  • In the U.S., there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate and lung, according to the American Cancer Society. Each year, 5 million people are treated for skin cancer. Here, Hans Schoellhammer, M.D., assistant clinical professor at City of Hope | Ant...
  • As public health experts know, health improvement starts in the community. Now, City of Hope  has been recognized for its efforts to improve the lives of residents of its own community. The institution will receive funding from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement  to support promising community-based work ...
  • For almost four decades, blood cancer survivors who received bone marrow, or stem cell, transplants have returned to City of Hope to celebrate life, second chances and science. The first reunion, in 1976, was a small affair: spaghetti for a single patient, his brother who served as his donor and those who took ...
  • Chemotherapy is an often-essential component of cancer treatment, attacking cells that divide quickly and helping stop cancer’s advance. But the very characteristics that make chemotherapy effective against cancer also can make it toxic to healthy cells, leading to side effects such as hair loss, nausea, ...
  • When you want to understand how to enhance the patient experience, go straight to the source: The patients. Patients and their families offer unique perspectives on care and services and can provide valuable insights about what is working well and what is not. That’s why City of Hope turns to them for advice. S...
  • Take it from City of Hope researchers: Medical science isn’t just for scientists, but something the whole family can enjoy. From 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 16, the institution will offer a variety of educational and fun-filled science and healthy living activities at its second Community Science Festiva...
  • Attention, parents! Only a few serious sunburns can increase a child’s ultimate risk of skin cancer. Further, some studies suggest that ultraviolet (UV) exposure before the age of 10 is the most important factor for melanoma risk. Here skin cancer expert Jae Jung, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the D...
  • Esophagheal cancer may not be on many people’s radar, but heartburn probably is. The latter can ultimately lead to the former. More formally referred to as gastroesophageal reflux, heartburn occurs when stomach content makes its way back up into the esophagus, causing stomach acid to come into contact with the ...
  • Many City of Hope cancer patients are opening their hearts to an electronic confidante. The tablet-based program, called SupportScreen, prompts them to share deeply personal concerns about their health — and helps jump-start their care. “We’ve found that people will reveal more to a machine than to a person. Te...
  • Older adults, by far, represent the largest population of cancer patients globally. With the median age of U.S. citizens projected to increase sharply in the next few years, the incidence of cancer is expected to rise higher, as well. City of Hope is at the forefront of geriatric cancer care, and an important n...
  • Treatment of cancers of the head and neck requires not just skill, but consummate skill. After all, consider their location: the lip, mouth, tongue, throat and nasal cavity – and that’s just for starters. Such treatment can include chemotherapy and radiation, but surgery is often the primary approach, wit...
  • On a spring day in 2013, 10-year-old Jackie Garcia of Whittier, California, noticed a lump in her jaw. Her mother suspected it was a minor problem, perhaps due to a fall, but made an appointment with a pediatrician, just to be on the safe side. “He thought it was an infection that was dental-related, and told [...
  • Creative expression comes in two very different forms for Robert Kang, M.D., M.P.H., assistant clinical professor of otolaryngology and a plastic surgeon at City of Hope. In his day job, Kang performs surgeries on patients with complex head and neck cancers, specializing in advanced facial reconstructions and r...
  • Surgery for head and neck cancers is unarguably complex, requiring extremely controlled movements and exceptional training. “Given where we are operating, our primary concern is maintaining speaking, swallowing and breathing,” said Ellie Maghami, M.D., chief of head and neck surgery, who recently teamed with Ro...