A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Programs

CCARE joins a multi-sectorial team representing advocacy groups, community organizations, faith-based organizations, academic institutions, health services organizations, the public and private sector, and policymakers. In collaboration with our 188 community partners, we provide educational workshops, materials and demonstrations as well as screening for early detection and disease prevention (e.g., diabetes, hypertension and breast-, cervical- and prostate cancers). CCARE also partners with community organizations including the American Cancer Society to implement health promotion, cancer prevention and early detection programs to respond to the needs of our diverse community. Since the inception of the CCARE program, thousands of people (predominantly African-American, Asian-American, and Latino-American) have participated in our community education events. Attendees reported increased knowledge about cancer risk reduction and awareness of community cancer resources
 
Community Health Promotion Activities

“Eat, Move, Live!”
This community collaborative program links City of Hope with cities and school districts to implement an obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases prevention program via culturally and linguistically appropriate nutrition and exercise classes for children and their parents, in a local school setting.
Over the years, the "Eat, Move, Live!" lifestyle intervention program has demonstrated success in increasing knowledge and practice of health behaviors among both adults and children.
  • Children demonstrated increased knowledge of food groups and health behaviors.
  • Parents demonstrated significant increases in knowledge and behavior by increasing daily servings of fruit and vegetables and daily physical activity.
  • Justifications provided by parents for not engaging in health behaviors (e.g., healthy eating) at pre-test were areas that were address by this series.
At the end of this class series, all participants reported they planned to use the healthy lifestyle changes they learned.
For more information on the "Eat, Move, Live!" program, and additional resources, click here.
 
Cancer Equity Forum
In honor of Minority Cancer Awareness Week, City of Hope hosts this special event on the third week of April, every year. Read more in Professional Development.

Cancer Screenings and Health Fairs
To address disparities, CCARE partners with community leaders in the greater Los Angeles and the Inland Empire areas to produce a series of health fairs and cancer screening events tailored to specific demographic groups. For all screening events, in addition to the diagnostic screenings, CCARE collaborates with community partners to present educational and demonstration workshops on health promotion and disease prevention. Lifesaving health screenings, e.g. diabetes and blood pressure tests, and cancer screenings, e.g., Pap smears, mammograms, and PSA tests are provided to attendees who have limited access to them elsewhere. Educational presentations, demonstrations, and healthy food samples augment the screenings in a fun “health fair” environment:
 
  • “Mejor Salud, Mejor Vida” Villa-Parke Community Center, Pasadena, California. This event featured information and lectures in Spanish on cancer, diabetes and nutrition.
  • A.K.A. Sorority Health Summit Health and educational services for the African American community.
  • Celebration of Life, Chinese Cancer Survivor Conference The focus of this conference, conducted in Mandarin, was to address health-related quality of life issues among Chinese cancer survivors.
  • LULAC: Latinos Living Healthy Feria de Salud Tens of thousands gathered on Olvera Street, in Los Angeles, for the free health screenings, entertainment, and games at the LULAC Feria de Salud. Read more here. Watch footage here.
 
To invite a speaker, please Contact Us to learn more about how we can come share with your local community!
 
 

 
 
 
 

Programs & Initiatives

Programs

CCARE joins a multi-sectorial team representing advocacy groups, community organizations, faith-based organizations, academic institutions, health services organizations, the public and private sector, and policymakers. In collaboration with our 188 community partners, we provide educational workshops, materials and demonstrations as well as screening for early detection and disease prevention (e.g., diabetes, hypertension and breast-, cervical- and prostate cancers). CCARE also partners with community organizations including the American Cancer Society to implement health promotion, cancer prevention and early detection programs to respond to the needs of our diverse community. Since the inception of the CCARE program, thousands of people (predominantly African-American, Asian-American, and Latino-American) have participated in our community education events. Attendees reported increased knowledge about cancer risk reduction and awareness of community cancer resources
 
Community Health Promotion Activities

“Eat, Move, Live!”
This community collaborative program links City of Hope with cities and school districts to implement an obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases prevention program via culturally and linguistically appropriate nutrition and exercise classes for children and their parents, in a local school setting.
Over the years, the "Eat, Move, Live!" lifestyle intervention program has demonstrated success in increasing knowledge and practice of health behaviors among both adults and children.
  • Children demonstrated increased knowledge of food groups and health behaviors.
  • Parents demonstrated significant increases in knowledge and behavior by increasing daily servings of fruit and vegetables and daily physical activity.
  • Justifications provided by parents for not engaging in health behaviors (e.g., healthy eating) at pre-test were areas that were address by this series.
At the end of this class series, all participants reported they planned to use the healthy lifestyle changes they learned.
For more information on the "Eat, Move, Live!" program, and additional resources, click here.
 
Cancer Equity Forum
In honor of Minority Cancer Awareness Week, City of Hope hosts this special event on the third week of April, every year. Read more in Professional Development.

Cancer Screenings and Health Fairs
To address disparities, CCARE partners with community leaders in the greater Los Angeles and the Inland Empire areas to produce a series of health fairs and cancer screening events tailored to specific demographic groups. For all screening events, in addition to the diagnostic screenings, CCARE collaborates with community partners to present educational and demonstration workshops on health promotion and disease prevention. Lifesaving health screenings, e.g. diabetes and blood pressure tests, and cancer screenings, e.g., Pap smears, mammograms, and PSA tests are provided to attendees who have limited access to them elsewhere. Educational presentations, demonstrations, and healthy food samples augment the screenings in a fun “health fair” environment:
 
  • “Mejor Salud, Mejor Vida” Villa-Parke Community Center, Pasadena, California. This event featured information and lectures in Spanish on cancer, diabetes and nutrition.
  • A.K.A. Sorority Health Summit Health and educational services for the African American community.
  • Celebration of Life, Chinese Cancer Survivor Conference The focus of this conference, conducted in Mandarin, was to address health-related quality of life issues among Chinese cancer survivors.
  • LULAC: Latinos Living Healthy Feria de Salud Tens of thousands gathered on Olvera Street, in Los Angeles, for the free health screenings, entertainment, and games at the LULAC Feria de Salud. Read more here. Watch footage here.
 
To invite a speaker, please Contact Us to learn more about how we can come share with your local community!
 
 

 
 
 
 
Overview
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.
 
 
Research Departments/Divisions

City of Hope is a leader in translational research - integrating basic science, clinical research and patient care.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Genetics, genes, genome, genetic risk … Such terms are becoming increasingly familiar to even nonresearchers as studies and information about the human make-up become more extensive and more critical. At City of Hope, these words have long been part of our vocabulary. Researchers and physicians are studyi...
  • Mammograms are currently the best method to detect breast cancer early, when it’s easier to treat and before it’s big enough to feel or cause symptoms. But recent mammogram screening guidelines may have left some women confused about when to undergo annual testing. Here Lusi Tumyan, M.D., chief of t...
  • Although chemotherapy can be effective in treating cancer, it can also exact a heavy toll on a patient’s health. One impressive alternative researchers have found is in the form of a vaccine. A type of immunotherapy, one part of the vaccine primes the body to react strongly against a tumor; the second part dire...
  • The breast cancer statistic is attention-getting: One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. That doesn’t mean that, if you’re one of eight women at a dinner table, one of you is fated to have breast cancer (read more on that breast cancer statistic), but it does mean that the ...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free. In his first post, ...
  • Advanced age tops the list among breast cancer risk factor for women. Not far behind is family history and genetics. Two City of Hope researchers delving deep into these issues recently received important grants to advance their studies. Arti Hurria, M.D., director of the Cancer and Aging Research Program, and ...
  • City of Hope is extending the reach of its lifesaving mission well beyond U.S. borders. To that end, three distinguished City of Hope leaders visited China earlier this year to lay the foundation for the institution’s new International Medicine Program. The program is part of City of Hope’s strategi...
  • A hallmark of cancer is that it doesn’t always limit itself to a primary location. It spreads. Breast cancer and lung cancer in particular are prone to spread, or metastasize, to the brain. Often the brain metastasis isn’t discovered until years after the initial diagnosis, just when patients were beginning to ...
  • Blueberries, cinnamon, baikal scullcap, grape seed extract (and grape skin extract), mushrooms, barberry, pomegranates … all contain compounds with the potential to treat, or prevent, cancer. Scientists at City of Hope have found tantalizing evidence of this potential and are determined to explore it to t...
  • Most women who are treated for breast cancer with a mastectomy do not choose to undergo reconstructive surgery. The reasons for this, according to a recent JAMA Surgery study, vary. Nearly half say they do not want any additional surgery, while nearly 34 percent say breast cancer reconstruction simply isn’t imp...
  • The leading risk factor for breast cancer is simply being a woman. The second top risk factor is getting older. Obviously, these two factors cannot be controlled, which is why all women should be aware of their risk and how to minimize those risks. Many risk factors can be mitigated, and simple changes can lead...
  • All women are at some risk of developing the disease in their lifetimes, but breast cancer, like other cancers, has a disproportionate effect on minorities. Although white women have the highest incidence of breast cancer, African-American women have the highest breast cancer death rates of all racial and ethni...
  • First, the good news: HIV infections have dropped dramatically over the past 30 years. Doctors, researchers and health officials have made great strides in preventing and treating the disease, turning what was once a death sentence into, for some, a chronic condition. Now, the reality check: HIV is still a worl...
  • Screening for breast cancer has dramatically increased the number of cancers found before they cause symptoms – catching the disease when it is most treatable and curable. Mammograms, however, are not infallible. It’s important to conduct self-exams, and know the signs and symptoms that should be checked by a h...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free.   In his previ...