A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development

City of Hope conducts basic research that produces valuable intellectual property, which is translated into new products, new businesses and new jobs.
 
The Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development (CATD) offers broad expertise in technology transfer and licensing, biologics manufacturing, quality assurance and regulatory affairs. It also fosters commercial investment in the development of inventions and discoveries derived from research at City of Hope by licensing the relevant intellectual property. Through evaluation, marketing and licensing processes, CATD supports this goal by ensuring that technologies created at City of Hope are developed and commercialized for the benefit of the widest possible audience.
 
Among its many activities, CATD also hosts conferences for venture capitalists, at which City of Hope investigators present their findings to potential funding sources.
 
Our Office of Technology Licensing (OTL) actively pursues patent protection for new inventions devised by its investigators deemed of commercial importance. Further, the OTL licenses intellectual property (IP) via Internet marketing, targeted marketing and inquiries by outside interested parties.
 
The Center for Biomedicine & Genetics (CBG) is a premier academic facility specializing in rapid production of pharmaceutical-grade materials. CBG invites collaborators from other institutions and biopharmaceutical companies to test promising new therapeutics, and supports phase I and II clinical trials at City of Hope.
 
The Office of IND Development and Regulatory Affairs helps campus investigators interact with governmental regulatory agencies and remain in compliance with United States Food and Drug Administration requirements.
 
City of Hope is a designated Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT) facility. For additional information about this program, click on the link: www.pactgroup.net/
 
Partners and Contributors
City of Hope is deeply grateful to our partners whose contributions have made the  Center for Biomedicine & Genetics possible. In particular, we would like to thank the National Office Products Industry . In recognition of their generous gift to Center for Biomedicine and Genetics (CBG), the first floor of the CBG facility is named the Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development.
 

Center for Applied Technology Development Staff

Center for Applied Technology Development

Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development

City of Hope conducts basic research that produces valuable intellectual property, which is translated into new products, new businesses and new jobs.
 
The Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development (CATD) offers broad expertise in technology transfer and licensing, biologics manufacturing, quality assurance and regulatory affairs. It also fosters commercial investment in the development of inventions and discoveries derived from research at City of Hope by licensing the relevant intellectual property. Through evaluation, marketing and licensing processes, CATD supports this goal by ensuring that technologies created at City of Hope are developed and commercialized for the benefit of the widest possible audience.
 
Among its many activities, CATD also hosts conferences for venture capitalists, at which City of Hope investigators present their findings to potential funding sources.
 
Our Office of Technology Licensing (OTL) actively pursues patent protection for new inventions devised by its investigators deemed of commercial importance. Further, the OTL licenses intellectual property (IP) via Internet marketing, targeted marketing and inquiries by outside interested parties.
 
The Center for Biomedicine & Genetics (CBG) is a premier academic facility specializing in rapid production of pharmaceutical-grade materials. CBG invites collaborators from other institutions and biopharmaceutical companies to test promising new therapeutics, and supports phase I and II clinical trials at City of Hope.
 
The Office of IND Development and Regulatory Affairs helps campus investigators interact with governmental regulatory agencies and remain in compliance with United States Food and Drug Administration requirements.
 
City of Hope is a designated Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT) facility. For additional information about this program, click on the link: www.pactgroup.net/
 
Partners and Contributors
City of Hope is deeply grateful to our partners whose contributions have made the  Center for Biomedicine & Genetics possible. In particular, we would like to thank the National Office Products Industry . In recognition of their generous gift to Center for Biomedicine and Genetics (CBG), the first floor of the CBG facility is named the Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development.
 

Meet Our Staff

Center for Applied Technology Development Staff

Contact Us
For inquiries concerning the CBG manufacturing facility and collaborative opportunities please contact:
 
Larry A. Couture, Ph.D. or
David Hsu, Ph.D.
Center for Applied Technology Development
City of Hope
1500 E. Duarte Road
Duarte, CA 91010
626-256-8728
Center for Applied Technology Development (CATD)
The Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development (CATD) offers broad expertise in technology transfer and licensing, biologics manufacturing, quality assurance and regulatory affairs.

Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Support Our Research
By giving to City of Hope, you support breakthrough discoveries in laboratory research that translate into lifesaving treatments for patients with cancer and other serious diseases.
 
 
 
 
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


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