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Circle 1500 benefits the Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope.

Our annual membership dues supports innovative research in search of solutions to breast and gynecologic cancers. Each year we vote to fund one of several promising research projects.

How can I help?
  • Join Circle 1500
  • Attend quarterly meetings and events
  • Vote on proposed projects
  • Encourage friends to join
 
Membership Dues
Annual membership is $500 (fully tax-deductible) and includes:

  • Four meetings each year
  • Annual celebration highlighting
  • Circle 1500-funded research
  • Opportunities to learn about important women’s health issues
 
Want to do more?
Join the Founder’s Circle for $1,500 (fully tax-deductible), which also includes:
 
  • Invitation-only opportunities to interact with Women’s Cancers Program physicians and researchers

 
 
 
For more information or to join, contact Janet Morgan at 213-241-7250 or jmorgan@coh.org.
 

 
About City of Hope's Women's Cancers Program
City of Hope has a history of innovation — including the technology behind Herceptin, a breakthrough drug for breast cancer.
 
Today, the Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope brings together experts across disciplines in dynamic collaborations. And special on-site drug manufacturing facilities enable City of Hope to translate discovery into treatment faster and more efficiently.
 
Some exciting areas of research in the Women’s Cancers Program:
  • Seeking new treatments that defeat disease with fewer and milder side effects
  • Developing medicines that target women’s cancers precisely
  • Studying superfoods like mushroom and blueberries as ways to prevent or treat women’s cancers
  • Examining which choices women can make to stop cancer before it ever starts

Photos

 
Circle 1500's January 2013 Breakfast Meeting: Sexuality After Cancer:
“Often a problem; seldom discussed”
 
An information meeting for Circle 1500 was held at City of Hope on September 19, 2013.  Guests and members met the leadership of the Women’s Cancers Program faculty, heard research updates from the Women’s Cancers Program, and had the opportunity to share their experiences with cancer.  Every woman knows someone who has dealt with breast or gynecologic cancer, and treatment and research advances at City of Hope provide promise for the future.  We welcome you to join our group and help to make a difference.
 
 
 

Circle 1500

Circle 1500 benefits the Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope.

Our annual membership dues supports innovative research in search of solutions to breast and gynecologic cancers. Each year we vote to fund one of several promising research projects.

How can I help?
  • Join Circle 1500
  • Attend quarterly meetings and events
  • Vote on proposed projects
  • Encourage friends to join
 
Membership Dues
Annual membership is $500 (fully tax-deductible) and includes:

  • Four meetings each year
  • Annual celebration highlighting
  • Circle 1500-funded research
  • Opportunities to learn about important women’s health issues
 
Want to do more?
Join the Founder’s Circle for $1,500 (fully tax-deductible), which also includes:
 
  • Invitation-only opportunities to interact with Women’s Cancers Program physicians and researchers

 
 
 
For more information or to join, contact Janet Morgan at 213-241-7250 or jmorgan@coh.org.
 

 
About City of Hope's Women's Cancers Program
City of Hope has a history of innovation — including the technology behind Herceptin, a breakthrough drug for breast cancer.
 
Today, the Women’s Cancers Program at City of Hope brings together experts across disciplines in dynamic collaborations. And special on-site drug manufacturing facilities enable City of Hope to translate discovery into treatment faster and more efficiently.
 
Some exciting areas of research in the Women’s Cancers Program:
  • Seeking new treatments that defeat disease with fewer and milder side effects
  • Developing medicines that target women’s cancers precisely
  • Studying superfoods like mushroom and blueberries as ways to prevent or treat women’s cancers
  • Examining which choices women can make to stop cancer before it ever starts

Photos

Photos

 
Circle 1500's January 2013 Breakfast Meeting: Sexuality After Cancer:
“Often a problem; seldom discussed”
 
An information meeting for Circle 1500 was held at City of Hope on September 19, 2013.  Guests and members met the leadership of the Women’s Cancers Program faculty, heard research updates from the Women’s Cancers Program, and had the opportunity to share their experiences with cancer.  Every woman knows someone who has dealt with breast or gynecologic cancer, and treatment and research advances at City of Hope provide promise for the future.  We welcome you to join our group and help to make a difference.
 
 
 
Events
 
Please join us for our New Member Meeting

New Member Meeting
Thursday, October 16, 2014
5 to 6:30 P.M.
JULIENNE FINE FOODS AND CELEBRATIONS
San Marino

A special group photo to be taken at this event!
Please wear or bring white

R.S.V.P. to Janet Morgan at 213-241-7250
or jmorgan@coh.org

Circle 1500 members are encouraged to bring guests to the meeting.
 

 
 
City of Hope has earned the highest overall rating of four stars for fiscal responsibility from Charity Navigator, America's premier independent charity watchdog group, for the fifth straight year.
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