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Investing in Our Future

 
City of Hope hosted the first Diversity Health Care Career Expo on September 18, 2014 in the hopes of bringing awareness to students and professionals of the many opportunities available in the health care field.
 
 
 
 

This partnership between City of Hope and the Duarte Unified School District (DUSD), an 80% minority school district, seeks to create a pipeline of students (especially underrepresented minority students) interested, engaged and prepared for biomedical research as a possible college and career choice. The SGV SEPAC has 3 aims: (1) establish a two-stage research education program for rising high school juniors and seniors; (2) establish a professional development program for K-12 teachers; and (3) establish a K-8 research education program. 
 
Regional Occupational Program (ROP)
High school students throughout the Los Angeles area experience life in a busy medical center over six weeks during the summer. Students explore diverse career from research and patient care to marketing technology. Class sessions include discussions and department tours. Students are matched up with mentors who help cultivate their specific interests. They also conduct a team health research project and present their results at a graduation luncheon attended by their mentors, family members and community leaders.
 
Bring Your Child to Work Day
This daylong program for 3rd through 5th grade students introduces the children of those who work or study at City of Hope to science and medicine through fun learning activities.
 
High school or undergraduate college students are given the opportunity to learn about science by actually doing it. Unlike traditional high school or college classes where the course of study is entirely determined by the instructor, City of Hope’s summer program students select their own research project according to their individual areas of interest. Students may also apply for the National Cancer Institute CURE program for underrepresented students or the CIRM Creativity Awards program (for high school students). Learn more.
 
A summer program designed for a select group of highly motivated students who aspire to have a career in healthcare or biomedicine.  Coordinated through the City of Hope, the group of young scholars will learn what it’s like to work in a clinical and scientific environment.  Students participating in the program will have the opportunity to visit world-class hospitals in the Los Angeles area and learn how a leading biotechnology company uses state of the art science to create medicine.  Upon completion of the two-week program, students will produce a project to promote careers in healthcare.
 
Train, Educate and Accelerate Careers in Healthcare (T.E.A.C.H.)
 The T.E.A.C.H. Project is a corporate partnership that connects public school students with high demand jobs by offering them college level courses in high-school, based on the skills needed for a career in health care information technology. High school students earn college credits at no/low cost, accelerating their ability to earn a two-year associate's degree in informational technology. Some may even obtain their high school diplomas and associate’s degrees simultaneously. In addition to providing input on the coursework, City of Hope provides projects, training, internships and mentoring opportunities. This intensive program provides unprecedented job-training and learning opportunities for students in a largely minority school district and helps to build a committed, diverse workforce for the growing needs of the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields.

Fellowships and Residencies
City of Hope offers a wide variety of clinical, research, pharmacy and administrative fellowships for continuing education and experience. Learn more.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
 

Investing in Our Future

Investing in Our Future

 
City of Hope hosted the first Diversity Health Care Career Expo on September 18, 2014 in the hopes of bringing awareness to students and professionals of the many opportunities available in the health care field.
 
 
 
 

This partnership between City of Hope and the Duarte Unified School District (DUSD), an 80% minority school district, seeks to create a pipeline of students (especially underrepresented minority students) interested, engaged and prepared for biomedical research as a possible college and career choice. The SGV SEPAC has 3 aims: (1) establish a two-stage research education program for rising high school juniors and seniors; (2) establish a professional development program for K-12 teachers; and (3) establish a K-8 research education program. 
 
Regional Occupational Program (ROP)
High school students throughout the Los Angeles area experience life in a busy medical center over six weeks during the summer. Students explore diverse career from research and patient care to marketing technology. Class sessions include discussions and department tours. Students are matched up with mentors who help cultivate their specific interests. They also conduct a team health research project and present their results at a graduation luncheon attended by their mentors, family members and community leaders.
 
Bring Your Child to Work Day
This daylong program for 3rd through 5th grade students introduces the children of those who work or study at City of Hope to science and medicine through fun learning activities.
 
High school or undergraduate college students are given the opportunity to learn about science by actually doing it. Unlike traditional high school or college classes where the course of study is entirely determined by the instructor, City of Hope’s summer program students select their own research project according to their individual areas of interest. Students may also apply for the National Cancer Institute CURE program for underrepresented students or the CIRM Creativity Awards program (for high school students). Learn more.
 
A summer program designed for a select group of highly motivated students who aspire to have a career in healthcare or biomedicine.  Coordinated through the City of Hope, the group of young scholars will learn what it’s like to work in a clinical and scientific environment.  Students participating in the program will have the opportunity to visit world-class hospitals in the Los Angeles area and learn how a leading biotechnology company uses state of the art science to create medicine.  Upon completion of the two-week program, students will produce a project to promote careers in healthcare.
 
Train, Educate and Accelerate Careers in Healthcare (T.E.A.C.H.)
 The T.E.A.C.H. Project is a corporate partnership that connects public school students with high demand jobs by offering them college level courses in high-school, based on the skills needed for a career in health care information technology. High school students earn college credits at no/low cost, accelerating their ability to earn a two-year associate's degree in informational technology. Some may even obtain their high school diplomas and associate’s degrees simultaneously. In addition to providing input on the coursework, City of Hope provides projects, training, internships and mentoring opportunities. This intensive program provides unprecedented job-training and learning opportunities for students in a largely minority school district and helps to build a committed, diverse workforce for the growing needs of the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields.

Fellowships and Residencies
City of Hope offers a wide variety of clinical, research, pharmacy and administrative fellowships for continuing education and experience. Learn more.
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
 
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
City of Hope is a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background, and approach, but tied together by our commitment to care for and cure those with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Download our Diversity & Inclusion brochure.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


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