A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Our Community Bookmark and Share

City of Hope is turning science into practical benefit…For our current and future patients and our community

City of Hope Leads the Way in Research  
 
Jeffrey Weitzel, M.D. is Chief of the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope. Dr. Weitzel's multidisciplinary clinical and research program emphasizes the recognition and assessment of people at increased risk for developing cancer because of family cancer history or personal risk factors. He is currently studying the incidence of breast cancer in Latina women. Learn more about Dr. Weitzel.
 
Amrita Krishnan, M.D., F.A.C.P., is Director of the Multiple Myeloma Program at City of Hope. Her work highlights the need for personalization in the treatment of multiple myeloma — the key is to tailor the therapy in the most appropriate way. Learn more about Dr. Krishnan.
 
Reducing Health Disparities
 
Population Sciences
The mission of the Department of Population Sciences is to advance the science and application of cancer etiology, prevention and outcomes, and reduce the burden of cancer and its sequelae across all populations, through collaborative multidisciplinary programs in clinical service, research and education. It’s divisions include Cancer Etiology, Center for Cancer Survivorship, CCARE, Clinical Cancer Genetics, Nursing Research and Education, Outcomes Research, and BMT Study.
 
Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education
CCARE implements specific best practice community strategies to reduce and eliminate inequalities in cancer outcomes. Our mission is to increase education and awareness of the most advanced practices in health care for all patients, bringing the best that City of Hope has to offer to underrepresented and underserved patients and communities.
 
Clinical Trials
At any given time, our researchers are conducting hundreds of clinical trials to test new treatments for cancer. Recruiting diverse participants to these trials allows us to better understand how cancer and its treatments impact different communities and people differently. Our clinical trials improve health.
 
Serving Our Latino Community
 
Given that cancer is the leading cause of death among Latinos in California, and recognizing that our primary service area is 46% Latino, we are taking more active steps to better understand and serve the Latino community.

Learn more about the current initiatives at City of Hope aimed at connecting with our Latino community.
 
City of Hope Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month
 
 
Here are some of the thoughts and feelings of our Latino employees. It couldn't be said any better:
"Not only does City of Hope support but encourages diversity."

"It's not just one size fits all, you can make it what you want it to be."

"I have a passion for learning… at City of Hope there are so many things to learn everyday."

"You're surrounded by the best minds this stimulates you to become the best scientist."

"You are part of an organization that impacts people daily, and we are changing lives, not only of the patient but of their entire family."

" ...everyone is there to do something amazing and support each other, it’s refreshing, extremely rare and absolutely unique."
 
Together, we are hope - #TogetherWeAreHope
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.

Our Community

City of Hope is turning science into practical benefit…For our current and future patients and our community

City of Hope Leads the Way in Research  
 
Jeffrey Weitzel, M.D. is Chief of the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope. Dr. Weitzel's multidisciplinary clinical and research program emphasizes the recognition and assessment of people at increased risk for developing cancer because of family cancer history or personal risk factors. He is currently studying the incidence of breast cancer in Latina women. Learn more about Dr. Weitzel.
 
Amrita Krishnan, M.D., F.A.C.P., is Director of the Multiple Myeloma Program at City of Hope. Her work highlights the need for personalization in the treatment of multiple myeloma — the key is to tailor the therapy in the most appropriate way. Learn more about Dr. Krishnan.
 
Reducing Health Disparities
 
Population Sciences
The mission of the Department of Population Sciences is to advance the science and application of cancer etiology, prevention and outcomes, and reduce the burden of cancer and its sequelae across all populations, through collaborative multidisciplinary programs in clinical service, research and education. It’s divisions include Cancer Etiology, Center for Cancer Survivorship, CCARE, Clinical Cancer Genetics, Nursing Research and Education, Outcomes Research, and BMT Study.
 
Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education
CCARE implements specific best practice community strategies to reduce and eliminate inequalities in cancer outcomes. Our mission is to increase education and awareness of the most advanced practices in health care for all patients, bringing the best that City of Hope has to offer to underrepresented and underserved patients and communities.
 
Clinical Trials
At any given time, our researchers are conducting hundreds of clinical trials to test new treatments for cancer. Recruiting diverse participants to these trials allows us to better understand how cancer and its treatments impact different communities and people differently. Our clinical trials improve health.
 
Serving Our Latino Community
 
Given that cancer is the leading cause of death among Latinos in California, and recognizing that our primary service area is 46% Latino, we are taking more active steps to better understand and serve the Latino community.

Learn more about the current initiatives at City of Hope aimed at connecting with our Latino community.
 
City of Hope Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month
 
 
Here are some of the thoughts and feelings of our Latino employees. It couldn't be said any better:
"Not only does City of Hope support but encourages diversity."

"It's not just one size fits all, you can make it what you want it to be."

"I have a passion for learning… at City of Hope there are so many things to learn everyday."

"You're surrounded by the best minds this stimulates you to become the best scientist."

"You are part of an organization that impacts people daily, and we are changing lives, not only of the patient but of their entire family."

" ...everyone is there to do something amazing and support each other, it’s refreshing, extremely rare and absolutely unique."
 
Together, we are hope - #TogetherWeAreHope
 
Contact us at diversityandinclusion@coh.org for more information.
We're a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background and approach.
 
We have career opportunities in nursing, research, allied health, business support and many other areas.
 
City of Hope employees enjoy excellent benefits and an environment that inspires wellness.
 
In addition to our main campus in Duarte, CA, we have several locations throughout the Los Angeles vicinity.
 
Current employees and external candidates are invited to explore our career opportunities.
 
City of Hope is a community of people characterized by our diversity of thought, background, and approach, but tied together by our commitment to care for and cure those with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Download our Diversity & Inclusion brochure.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • White button mushrooms seem fairly innocuous as fungi go. Unlike portabellas, they don’t center stage at the dinner table, and unlike truffles, they’re not the subject of gourmand fervor. But appearances can be deceiving when it comes to these mild-mannered Clark Kents of the food world. In a study ...
  • Doctors often recommend preventive screenings for several cancers, based on hereditary or genetic factors, but brain tumors aren’t one of them. Primary brain tumors, which originate in the brain rather than spreading from another location, seem to develop at random, and doctors have little insight into wh...
  • Stopping cancer starts with research. To that end, STOP CANCER has awarded $525,000 in grants to City of Hope for 2015, supporting innovative research projects and recognizing the institution’s leadership in advancing cancer treatment and prevention. Founded in 1988, STOP CANCER underwrites the work of le...
  • Cancer may not be the disease many people think it is. Normally, cancer is considered to be a disease in which cells multiply at an extremely high, and unusual, rate – increasing the likelihood of genetic mutations. But increasingly, leading researchers at City of Hope and elsewhere are contending that cancer i...
  • “Of all forms of inequality, injustice in the health care system is the most shocking and inhumane.” By the time the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke those words in Chicago in 1966, the Civil Rights Act had been passed, the Voting Rights Act was the law of the land and the March on Washington was […]
  • Eight years ago, Matthew Loscalzo surprised himself by accepting the offer to become City of Hope’s administrative director of the Sheri & Les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center and executive director of the Department of Supportive Care Medicine. At the time, he was administrative director of the Sc...
  • The mental fog that patients can experience after undergoing chemotherapy treatment for cancer has a name: “chemo brain.” “Many patients report hearing or reading about chemotherapy-related cognitive deficits, but few are actually prepared to deal with these changes,” said Celina Lemon, M.A., an occupational th...
  • Cancer treatments have improved over the years, but one potential source of treatments and cures remains largely untapped: nature. Blueberries, cinnamon, xinfeng, grape seed (and skin) extract, mushrooms, barberry and pomegranates all contain compounds with the potential to treat or prevent cancer. Scientists a...
  • In the U.S., there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate and lung, according to the American Cancer Society. Each year, 5 million people are treated for skin cancer. Here, Hans Schoellhammer, M.D., assistant clinical professor at City of Hope | Ant...
  • As public health experts know, health improvement starts in the community. Now, City of Hope  has been recognized for its efforts to improve the lives of residents of its own community. The institution will receive funding from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement  to support promising community-based work ...
  • For almost four decades, blood cancer survivors who received bone marrow, or stem cell, transplants have returned to City of Hope to celebrate life, second chances and science. The first reunion, in 1976, was a small affair: spaghetti for a single patient, his brother who served as his donor and those who took ...
  • Chemotherapy is an often-essential component of cancer treatment, attacking cells that divide quickly and helping stop cancer’s advance. But the very characteristics that make chemotherapy effective against cancer also can make it toxic to healthy cells, leading to side effects such as hair loss, nausea, ...
  • When you want to understand how to enhance the patient experience, go straight to the source: The patients. Patients and their families offer unique perspectives on care and services and can provide valuable insights about what is working well and what is not. That’s why City of Hope turns to them for advice. S...
  • Take it from City of Hope researchers: Medical science isn’t just for scientists, but something the whole family can enjoy. From 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 16, the institution will offer a variety of educational and fun-filled science and healthy living activities at its second Community Science Festiva...
  • Attention, parents! Only a few serious sunburns can increase a child’s ultimate risk of skin cancer. Further, some studies suggest that ultraviolet (UV) exposure before the age of 10 is the most important factor for melanoma risk. Here skin cancer expert Jae Jung, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the D...