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Research and Clinical Trials

City of Hope's Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute is recognized internationally for its breakthrough research discoveries and clinical trials for developing new ways to treat hematological cancers. Patients at City of Hope will have the ability to enroll in these trials, which can expand their treatment options and improve their outcomes. Learn more about our clinical trials program .
 
Highlights of our current research efforts include:

Reducing the Risk of GvHD
 
While stem cell transplants can be a lifesaving procedure for patients with hematologic disorders, it also carries a risk of graft versus host disease (GvHD), in which the newly transplanted stem cells do not recognize the recipient’s body as their own and start producing an immune response against it, leading to chronic and potentially serious complications. To reduce the likelihood of GvHD and to improve transplant outcomes, City of Hope is researching new ways to classify and match stem cell donors and recipients.
 
Adoptive T Cell Therapy
 
Harnessing the patient’s own immune system against the cancer, specifically through T-cell modification. In this experimental therapy, the patient’s own T-cells are extracted from the body, modified to recognize and attack cancer cells and re-infused back into the patient. This treatment has shown positive results for patients with lymphoma and lymphoid leukemia and is currently being studied for its potential against myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma. Learn more about our Adoptive T Cell Therapy research.
 
Nonmyeloablative (Mini) Transplants
 
Our use and refinement of nonmyeloablative (“mini”) transplants, which relies less on the heavy doses of chemotherapy and radiation and more on the anti-cancer effects of the transplant itself. This novel approach allows otherwise ineligible patients, such as older patients or those who cannot tolerate radiation/chemotherapy-related effects, to be treated with this lifesaving procedure. Learn more about nonmyeloablative transplants.
 
Specialized Drug Studies
 
Continual development and improvement of drug regimens to treat hematologic cancers. Recently, City of Hope had led a national study of the drug brentuximab in patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma, in whom the drug produced a high rate of response compared to standard therapy.
 
Leukemia Stem Cell Research
 
The Division of Stem Cell and Leukemia Research is currently investigating leukemia stem cells, which several studies have suggested to cause leukemia. By identifying and eradicating these cancerous stem cells — instead of just the mature leukemia cells that conventional therapies target — a definitive cure for this disease can be achieved.
 
Long-term Follow-up Program
 
City of Hope has a formal Long-term Follow-up Program that monitors all patients who have received a transplant at City of Hope to ensure they have optimal quality of life following their diagnoses and treatments. The program also helps researchers compile data on long-term outcomes to increase awareness of the kinds of problems, both physical and psychological, that some patients face after transplant, so patients can receive timely and appropriate information and care.
 
National Cancer Institute Project Grant
 
The City of Hope’s Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute has been continuously funded for nearly 30 years by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to develop innovative therapies for people battling leukemia, lymphoma and other cancers. The NCI grant supports continuing research aimed at improving the outcome for patients undergoing either autologous or allogeneic transplant for a hematologic cancer. The grant also allows researchers at City of Hope to develop laboratory-based clinical studies to expand the scope and applications of stem cell transplants. These studies include incorporating gene transfer, molecular biology, radioimmunotherapy, cellular immunotherapy and genetics to improve transplant outcomes.
 
SPORE Grant
 
City of Hope was awarded a Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant to further its work in utilizing transplant and non-transplant approaches for the treatment of lymphoma. This SPORE is one of only five lymphoma SPORE awards granted in the United States and builds upon the expertise in the transplant and cancer immunotherapy programs at City of Hope.
 
 
If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.
 

Research and Clinical Trials

Research and Clinical Trials

City of Hope's Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute is recognized internationally for its breakthrough research discoveries and clinical trials for developing new ways to treat hematological cancers. Patients at City of Hope will have the ability to enroll in these trials, which can expand their treatment options and improve their outcomes. Learn more about our clinical trials program .
 
Highlights of our current research efforts include:

Reducing the Risk of GvHD
 
While stem cell transplants can be a lifesaving procedure for patients with hematologic disorders, it also carries a risk of graft versus host disease (GvHD), in which the newly transplanted stem cells do not recognize the recipient’s body as their own and start producing an immune response against it, leading to chronic and potentially serious complications. To reduce the likelihood of GvHD and to improve transplant outcomes, City of Hope is researching new ways to classify and match stem cell donors and recipients.
 
Adoptive T Cell Therapy
 
Harnessing the patient’s own immune system against the cancer, specifically through T-cell modification. In this experimental therapy, the patient’s own T-cells are extracted from the body, modified to recognize and attack cancer cells and re-infused back into the patient. This treatment has shown positive results for patients with lymphoma and lymphoid leukemia and is currently being studied for its potential against myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma. Learn more about our Adoptive T Cell Therapy research.
 
Nonmyeloablative (Mini) Transplants
 
Our use and refinement of nonmyeloablative (“mini”) transplants, which relies less on the heavy doses of chemotherapy and radiation and more on the anti-cancer effects of the transplant itself. This novel approach allows otherwise ineligible patients, such as older patients or those who cannot tolerate radiation/chemotherapy-related effects, to be treated with this lifesaving procedure. Learn more about nonmyeloablative transplants.
 
Specialized Drug Studies
 
Continual development and improvement of drug regimens to treat hematologic cancers. Recently, City of Hope had led a national study of the drug brentuximab in patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma, in whom the drug produced a high rate of response compared to standard therapy.
 
Leukemia Stem Cell Research
 
The Division of Stem Cell and Leukemia Research is currently investigating leukemia stem cells, which several studies have suggested to cause leukemia. By identifying and eradicating these cancerous stem cells — instead of just the mature leukemia cells that conventional therapies target — a definitive cure for this disease can be achieved.
 
Long-term Follow-up Program
 
City of Hope has a formal Long-term Follow-up Program that monitors all patients who have received a transplant at City of Hope to ensure they have optimal quality of life following their diagnoses and treatments. The program also helps researchers compile data on long-term outcomes to increase awareness of the kinds of problems, both physical and psychological, that some patients face after transplant, so patients can receive timely and appropriate information and care.
 
National Cancer Institute Project Grant
 
The City of Hope’s Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute has been continuously funded for nearly 30 years by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to develop innovative therapies for people battling leukemia, lymphoma and other cancers. The NCI grant supports continuing research aimed at improving the outcome for patients undergoing either autologous or allogeneic transplant for a hematologic cancer. The grant also allows researchers at City of Hope to develop laboratory-based clinical studies to expand the scope and applications of stem cell transplants. These studies include incorporating gene transfer, molecular biology, radioimmunotherapy, cellular immunotherapy and genetics to improve transplant outcomes.
 
SPORE Grant
 
City of Hope was awarded a Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant to further its work in utilizing transplant and non-transplant approaches for the treatment of lymphoma. This SPORE is one of only five lymphoma SPORE awards granted in the United States and builds upon the expertise in the transplant and cancer immunotherapy programs at City of Hope.
 
 
If you have been diagnosed with a hematologic cancer or are looking for a second opinion consultation about your treatment, find out more about becoming a patient or contact us at 800-826-HOPE.
 
Quick Links
About the HCT Program
Stephen J. Forman, M.D., chair of hematology and hematopoietic cell transplantation, shares his views on the essence of care at City of Hope. He highlights the bone marrow transplant program (BMT) and the program's growth over the years.
 
Other videos:
 
Past BMT Reunions
Each year, City of Hope invites bone marrow transplant recipients and their families to attend the "Celebration of Life" event. View highlights from past reunions.
 
The focus of the Division of Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Leukemia Research is to improve the understanding of leukemia stem cells in order to develop cures for leukemia and other hematologic malignancies.
City of Hope's partnership with the Los Angeles Dodgers, includes ThinkCure!, an innovative, community-based non-profit that raises funds to accelerate collaborative research at City of Hope and Childrens Hospital Los Angeles to cure cancers.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
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  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the Rose Parade is “Inspiring Stories.”...
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  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Here...
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  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” By V...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” The ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” In 2...