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COMFORT Communication for Palliative Care Teams: Improving the Quality of Care

City of Hope's Division of Nursing Research and Education is excited to present "COMFORTTM SM Communication for Palliative Care Teams: Improving the Quality of Care" with generous support from the Archstone Foundation.
 
On January 28-29, 2015 competitively selected teams will learn and network with other healthcare professionals during this two-day course taking place at the California Endowment Center in Los Angeles (Address: 1000 N. Alameda St. Los Angeles, CA 90012, Next to Union Station).
 
This course is free to competitively selected interdisciplinary teams (two participants per team) from palliative care programs throughout the state of California. The aim of this grant-funded course is to improve the quality of care for patients and families by offering a palliative care communication course. The curriculum is appropriate for all core disciplines (physician, nurse, social worker, chaplain). Target Audience: CA-Based Palliative Care Professionals.
 
This course is organized by the themes of the COMFORT communication curriculum, an evidence-based, theoretically-grounded curriculum that summarizes the basic principles of palliative care communication. This interactive course will include communication skills-building sessions and provide participants with a communication toolkit that includes a copy of the curriculum, books, video examples, and additional resources to bring back to participant institutions. More information about health communication research, trainings and resources are  available via the recently launched Palliative Care Communication Institute (PCC Institute) website: www.pccinstitute.com.
 
The Application is now CLOSED for the January 2015 course. Please email pallcarecomm@coh.org to be added to our mailing list for future course opportunities.
 
Each Selected Participant Receives:
 
  • Free Registration
  • Materials
  • Meals/Snacks
  • Goal Follow-Up: 6 & 9 Months Post-Course
  • 13.5 Continuing Education Units (CEU) &/or 13.25 CME Hours
  • Travel Information
 
Objectives of the Course:
 
  1. Demonstrate a minimum of two new communication skills for use in practice with patients with advanced disease and their family members
  2. Identify practices of patient-centered communication with patients and family members
  3. Define the narrative approach to clinical communication
  4. Describe the main principles of interdisciplinary team collaboration
 
To learn more about faculty for COMFORTTM SM Communication for Palliative Care Teams, click here!
 
*CEU Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider #: CEP 13380 for 13.5 contact hours; and course meets the qualifications for 13.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, BBS Provider#: PCE 2401 (CE Provider: City of Hope National Medical Center/Beckman Research Institute). No partial CEs given. You must attend entire program to receive CEs.
 
CME Accreditation Statement: City of Hope is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 
Credit Designation: City of Hope designates this live activity for a maximum of 13.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
 
Allied Health Care Professionals: Registered nurses may report up to 13.25 credit hour toward the continuing education requirement for license renewal by their state Board of Registered Nurses (BRN). CME may be noted on the license renewal application in lieu of a BRN provider number. • The National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants states that AMA accredited Category 1 courses are accepted for re certification. City of Hope is accredited by the California State Board of Behavioral Sciences, PCE Provider #4017. This activity meets the qualifications for 13.25 hour credit for MFTs and or LCSWs as required by the California State Board of Behavioral Sciences.
 
 

COMFORT Communication for Palliative Care Teams: Faculty

Betty Ferrell, RN, PhD, MA, FAAN, FPCN, CHPN has been in nursing for 36 years and has focused her clinical expertise and research in pain management, quality of life, and palliative care. Dr. Ferrell is the Director of  Division of Nursing Research and Education and a Professor at City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in Duarte, California. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and she has over 350 publications in peer-reviewed journals and texts. She is Principal Investigator of a Program funded by the National Cancer Institute on “Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptom Concerns in Lung Cancer” and Principal Investigator of the “End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)” project. She directs several other funded projects related to palliative care in cancer centers and QOL issues. Dr. Ferrell is a member of the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute and was Chairperson of the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. Dr. Ferrell completed a Masters degree in Theology, Ethics and Culture from Claremont Graduate University in 2007. She has authored nine books including her latest book Communication in Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2013). Other titles include: Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2010), Making Health Care Whole: Integrating Spirituality into Patient Care (Templeton Press, 2010), and The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2008). In 2013 Dr. Ferrell was named one of the 30 Visionaries in the field by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. 
Elaine Wittenberg-Lyles, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Division of Nursing Research and Education at City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in Duarte, CA. She holds a PhD in Communication from the University of Oklahoma. With a focus on hospice and palliative care, she is co-author of Communication as Comfort: Multiple Voices in Palliative Care (Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, 2008) which details the complexities of communication in end-of-life care and Dying with Comfort: Family Illness Narratives and Early Palliative Care (Hampton Press, 2010) both awarded Book of the Year by the National Communication Association. Her latest volume Communication in Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2013) details the COMFORT TM SM Communication Curriculum that provides interprofessional healthcare staff with instruction on palliative care communication. Dr. Wittenberg-Lyles along with an editorial team of 7, are currently working on the Textbook of Palliative Care Communication, scheduled for publication in 2015 by Oxford University Press. She is co-founder of the Clinical Communication Collaborative (www.clinicalcc.com) and has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed articles on hospice and palliative care. Her work can be found in Qualitative Health Research, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Journal of Palliative Medicine, and the European Journal of Cancer Care. She and her colleagues recently launched Health Communication, a free iOS application that provides easy to use communication strategies accessible on smartphone or ipad.;
Dawn Gross, MD, PhD has trained a multitude of healthcare professionals from medical students to residents of varied specialties, fellows and allied healthcare professionals. As scientist, author, poet and lecturer, she has addressed both lay and professional audiences and engaged even the most oppositional in a dialogue of discovering what people wish to ensure delivery of the care they want.  But it is her own story, being at the bedside of her father, the arm of her mother and ear of her brother during her father’s last six months of life, that is at the very heart of her work. Dawn became a hospice physician after her father passed away in 2006. Prior to this she trained as a hematologist and bone marrow transplant physician/scientist at Stanford completing her post-doctoral research at UCSF. She earned her MD and PhD in Immunology at Tufts and her BA from USC. Dawn is now at City of Hope and is a Clinical Professor and Arthur M. Coppola Family Chair of the Department of Supportive Care Medicine. Her vision is to change the landscape of end-of-life care conversations such that they are the portals to living inspiring lives now and having wishes come true.
Joy Goldsmith, PhD has been conducting research on communication and illness, specifically in the context of palliative care and hospice, for the last decade. Her numerous publications in clinical as well as communication journals address health communication training, oncology nurse training, interprofessional communication in health care, and family caregiver communication. A long-time collaborator with a team of health communication and clinical scholars, she has co-authored four books including Communication as Comfort: Multiple Voices in Palliative Care (Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, 2008), Dying with Comfort: Family Illness Narratives and Early Palliative Care (Hampton Press, 2010), Communication in Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2013), and Speaking of Dying (2012, Brazos Press). Currently she holds a contract with Oxford University Press for the Textbook of Palliative Care Communication, to be released in 2015. Her work also can be found in Qualitative Health Research, Health Communication, Social Science and Medicine, American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, Seminars in Oncology Nursing, Medical Teacher, and the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing.
Judith Paice, PhD is currently the Director of the Cancer Pain Program in the Division of Hematology-Oncology, a Research Professor of Medicine, Northwestern University; Feinberg School of Medicine, as well as a full member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. Her clinical work is in the relief of cancer-related pain. In this role she has also conducted research examining the characteristics of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy; and is currently pursuing interventions to prevent and manage this syndrome. Dr. Paice has served in numerous professional leadership positions, including President of the American Pain Society and Secretary of the International Association for the Study of Pain. She has a strong commitment to educating other healthcare professionals regarding relief of cancer pain within the developed and developing world, and have traveled within the People’s Republic of China, Egypt, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Nigeria, Taiwan, Tanzania, and Tajikistan. As part of her dedication to teaching, she was one of the original consultants in the End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) and continues to serve as faculty.  Dr. Paice serves on the editorial board of Clinical Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.
Terry Irish, BA, MDiv, DMin, BCC after completing Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) at Stanford Hospital & Clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area, he accepted the position as a staff chaplain at City of Hope, where he continues to serve as the Medical/Oncology and Pediatrics’ Department chaplain. He is a Board Certified Chaplain through the Association of Professional Chaplains.  He serves as the chaplain on a Program funded by the National Cancer Institute on “Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptom Concerns in Lung Cancer” and currently serves as the District Chaplaincy Director for the Los Angeles District, Church of the Nazarene. He served as a chaplain on an Archstone Foundation-funded “Demonstration Project for Improving the Quality of Spiritual Care” and currently serves as Co-Investigator for the Archstone Foundation-funded “Palliative Care Communication Training for Improved Quality of Care.”  He helped author the bereavement booklet “When Someone You Love Dies: A Guide to Bereavement” (2013), now in Spanish and soon to be translated into Chinese. In 2012 Rev. Dr. Irish received the Award of Excellence from the Southern California Cancer Pain Initiative in recognition of his contribution to cancer pain relief.
Sandra L. Ragan, Ph.D is Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication, University of Oklahoma.  Serving the University of Oklahoma from 1983-2006, she held the positions of graduate director, department chair, and associate dean of the College of Arts & Sciences.  She has co-authored seven scholarly books, including Communication as Comfort:  Multiple Voices in Palliative Care and its companion volumes Dying with COMFORT: Family Illness Narratives and Early Palliative Care and Communication and Palliative Nursing. Her books and scholarly articles can be found in Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Health Communication, Communication Yearbook, and others, and focus on language in social interaction, notably in the context of health communication, especially women’s health and palliative care.  She has been writing about palliative care communication since 2003.
Lisa Kilburn, BA Project Coordinator (City of Hope) Lisa works in the Division of Nursing Research and Education at City of Hope with Drs. Ferrell and Wittenberg-Lyles. In addition to coordinating the Palliative Care Communication Training for Improved Quality of Care, she is the editorial assistant for the forthcoming Textbook of Palliative Care Communication (Oxford University Press). Her previous work included coordinating the ExCEL in Social Work program, assisting with the Textbook of Palliative Social Work (Oxford University Press, 2011) and co-authoring articles in the Journal of Cancer Education, Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care, and Research on Social Work Practice.
   
   
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

COMFORT Communication for Oncology Nurses

City of Hope's Division of Nursing Research and Education is presenting “COMFORTTM SM Communication for Oncology Nurses: Improving Patient-Centered Communication and Cancer Care”, a professional training program for oncology nurses funded by the National Cancer Institute. Applications are now being accepted through February 1, 2015!   Apply Now-See Application Below.
 
Currently, two courses are being offered: June 11-12 at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, CA and October 15-16 in Washington, DC. These two-day courses are free to competitively selected oncology nurse teams (two participants per team) from cancer settings across the United States. The aim of these grant-funded courses is to improve cancer care across the disease trajectory by promoting nurse communication skill development. The curriculum is appropriate for any level of learner (CEUs will be offered).
 
Using the evidence-based COMFORTTM SM Communication Curriculum, these interactive courses will include communication skills-building sessions and provide participants with a communication toolkit that includes a copy of the curriculum, books, USB of video examples with teaching guide, and additional resources. Using a goal-directed method of teaching, faculty will help teams develop three goals for implementing process improvement related to communication. To learn more about the COMFORTTM SM curriculum, research, training and resources, visit the recently launched Palliative Care Communication (PCC) Institute website: www.pccinstitute.com
 
Each selected participant will receive:
 
  • Free registration
  • Materials
  • Meals/snacks
  • Goal follow-up at 6 and 12 months post-course
  • Continuing education units (CEU)
     
APPLY NOW and Spread the Word!
 

 
COMFORTTM SM Communication for Oncology Nurses Faculty:
 
Elaine Wittenberg, Ph.D.
City of Hope
 
Betty Ferrell, Ph.D., FAAN, FPCN
City of Hope
 
Patrick Coyne, MSN, ACHPN, ACNS-BC, FAAN, FPCN
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center
 
Susan Eggly, Ph.D.
Wayne State University School of Medicine/Karmanos Cancer Institute
 
Lee Ellington, Ph.D.
Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah
 
Joy Goldsmith, Ph.D.
University of Memphis
 
Maryjo Prince-Paul, Ph.D., APRN, ACHPN, FPCN
Western Reserve University, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing
 
Sandra L. Ragan, Ph.D.
The University of Oklahoma
 
Richard L. Street, Jr. Ph.D.
Texas A&M University
Houston Center for Quality of Care, Baylor College of Medicine
 
Virginia Sun, RN, Ph.D.
City of Hope
 
 
City of Hope/Beckman Research Institute, Nursing Research & Education-Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 13380, for 13 contact hours. No partial CEs given.  You must attend entire program to receive CEs.
 

COMFORT Communication

COMFORT Communication for Palliative Care Teams: Improving the Quality of Care

City of Hope's Division of Nursing Research and Education is excited to present "COMFORTTM SM Communication for Palliative Care Teams: Improving the Quality of Care" with generous support from the Archstone Foundation.
 
On January 28-29, 2015 competitively selected teams will learn and network with other healthcare professionals during this two-day course taking place at the California Endowment Center in Los Angeles (Address: 1000 N. Alameda St. Los Angeles, CA 90012, Next to Union Station).
 
This course is free to competitively selected interdisciplinary teams (two participants per team) from palliative care programs throughout the state of California. The aim of this grant-funded course is to improve the quality of care for patients and families by offering a palliative care communication course. The curriculum is appropriate for all core disciplines (physician, nurse, social worker, chaplain). Target Audience: CA-Based Palliative Care Professionals.
 
This course is organized by the themes of the COMFORT communication curriculum, an evidence-based, theoretically-grounded curriculum that summarizes the basic principles of palliative care communication. This interactive course will include communication skills-building sessions and provide participants with a communication toolkit that includes a copy of the curriculum, books, video examples, and additional resources to bring back to participant institutions. More information about health communication research, trainings and resources are  available via the recently launched Palliative Care Communication Institute (PCC Institute) website: www.pccinstitute.com.
 
The Application is now CLOSED for the January 2015 course. Please email pallcarecomm@coh.org to be added to our mailing list for future course opportunities.
 
Each Selected Participant Receives:
 
  • Free Registration
  • Materials
  • Meals/Snacks
  • Goal Follow-Up: 6 & 9 Months Post-Course
  • 13.5 Continuing Education Units (CEU) &/or 13.25 CME Hours
  • Travel Information
 
Objectives of the Course:
 
  1. Demonstrate a minimum of two new communication skills for use in practice with patients with advanced disease and their family members
  2. Identify practices of patient-centered communication with patients and family members
  3. Define the narrative approach to clinical communication
  4. Describe the main principles of interdisciplinary team collaboration
 
To learn more about faculty for COMFORTTM SM Communication for Palliative Care Teams, click here!
 
*CEU Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, BRN Provider #: CEP 13380 for 13.5 contact hours; and course meets the qualifications for 13.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, BBS Provider#: PCE 2401 (CE Provider: City of Hope National Medical Center/Beckman Research Institute). No partial CEs given. You must attend entire program to receive CEs.
 
CME Accreditation Statement: City of Hope is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 
Credit Designation: City of Hope designates this live activity for a maximum of 13.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
 
Allied Health Care Professionals: Registered nurses may report up to 13.25 credit hour toward the continuing education requirement for license renewal by their state Board of Registered Nurses (BRN). CME may be noted on the license renewal application in lieu of a BRN provider number. • The National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants states that AMA accredited Category 1 courses are accepted for re certification. City of Hope is accredited by the California State Board of Behavioral Sciences, PCE Provider #4017. This activity meets the qualifications for 13.25 hour credit for MFTs and or LCSWs as required by the California State Board of Behavioral Sciences.
 
 

Faculty: COMFORT Communication for PC Teams

COMFORT Communication for Palliative Care Teams: Faculty

Betty Ferrell, RN, PhD, MA, FAAN, FPCN, CHPN has been in nursing for 36 years and has focused her clinical expertise and research in pain management, quality of life, and palliative care. Dr. Ferrell is the Director of  Division of Nursing Research and Education and a Professor at City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in Duarte, California. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and she has over 350 publications in peer-reviewed journals and texts. She is Principal Investigator of a Program funded by the National Cancer Institute on “Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptom Concerns in Lung Cancer” and Principal Investigator of the “End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)” project. She directs several other funded projects related to palliative care in cancer centers and QOL issues. Dr. Ferrell is a member of the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute and was Chairperson of the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. Dr. Ferrell completed a Masters degree in Theology, Ethics and Culture from Claremont Graduate University in 2007. She has authored nine books including her latest book Communication in Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2013). Other titles include: Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2010), Making Health Care Whole: Integrating Spirituality into Patient Care (Templeton Press, 2010), and The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2008). In 2013 Dr. Ferrell was named one of the 30 Visionaries in the field by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. 
Elaine Wittenberg-Lyles, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Division of Nursing Research and Education at City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in Duarte, CA. She holds a PhD in Communication from the University of Oklahoma. With a focus on hospice and palliative care, she is co-author of Communication as Comfort: Multiple Voices in Palliative Care (Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, 2008) which details the complexities of communication in end-of-life care and Dying with Comfort: Family Illness Narratives and Early Palliative Care (Hampton Press, 2010) both awarded Book of the Year by the National Communication Association. Her latest volume Communication in Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2013) details the COMFORT TM SM Communication Curriculum that provides interprofessional healthcare staff with instruction on palliative care communication. Dr. Wittenberg-Lyles along with an editorial team of 7, are currently working on the Textbook of Palliative Care Communication, scheduled for publication in 2015 by Oxford University Press. She is co-founder of the Clinical Communication Collaborative (www.clinicalcc.com) and has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed articles on hospice and palliative care. Her work can be found in Qualitative Health Research, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Journal of Palliative Medicine, and the European Journal of Cancer Care. She and her colleagues recently launched Health Communication, a free iOS application that provides easy to use communication strategies accessible on smartphone or ipad.;
Dawn Gross, MD, PhD has trained a multitude of healthcare professionals from medical students to residents of varied specialties, fellows and allied healthcare professionals. As scientist, author, poet and lecturer, she has addressed both lay and professional audiences and engaged even the most oppositional in a dialogue of discovering what people wish to ensure delivery of the care they want.  But it is her own story, being at the bedside of her father, the arm of her mother and ear of her brother during her father’s last six months of life, that is at the very heart of her work. Dawn became a hospice physician after her father passed away in 2006. Prior to this she trained as a hematologist and bone marrow transplant physician/scientist at Stanford completing her post-doctoral research at UCSF. She earned her MD and PhD in Immunology at Tufts and her BA from USC. Dawn is now at City of Hope and is a Clinical Professor and Arthur M. Coppola Family Chair of the Department of Supportive Care Medicine. Her vision is to change the landscape of end-of-life care conversations such that they are the portals to living inspiring lives now and having wishes come true.
Joy Goldsmith, PhD has been conducting research on communication and illness, specifically in the context of palliative care and hospice, for the last decade. Her numerous publications in clinical as well as communication journals address health communication training, oncology nurse training, interprofessional communication in health care, and family caregiver communication. A long-time collaborator with a team of health communication and clinical scholars, she has co-authored four books including Communication as Comfort: Multiple Voices in Palliative Care (Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, 2008), Dying with Comfort: Family Illness Narratives and Early Palliative Care (Hampton Press, 2010), Communication in Palliative Nursing (Oxford University Press, 2013), and Speaking of Dying (2012, Brazos Press). Currently she holds a contract with Oxford University Press for the Textbook of Palliative Care Communication, to be released in 2015. Her work also can be found in Qualitative Health Research, Health Communication, Social Science and Medicine, American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, Seminars in Oncology Nursing, Medical Teacher, and the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing.
Judith Paice, PhD is currently the Director of the Cancer Pain Program in the Division of Hematology-Oncology, a Research Professor of Medicine, Northwestern University; Feinberg School of Medicine, as well as a full member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. Her clinical work is in the relief of cancer-related pain. In this role she has also conducted research examining the characteristics of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy; and is currently pursuing interventions to prevent and manage this syndrome. Dr. Paice has served in numerous professional leadership positions, including President of the American Pain Society and Secretary of the International Association for the Study of Pain. She has a strong commitment to educating other healthcare professionals regarding relief of cancer pain within the developed and developing world, and have traveled within the People’s Republic of China, Egypt, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Nigeria, Taiwan, Tanzania, and Tajikistan. As part of her dedication to teaching, she was one of the original consultants in the End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) and continues to serve as faculty.  Dr. Paice serves on the editorial board of Clinical Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.
Terry Irish, BA, MDiv, DMin, BCC after completing Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) at Stanford Hospital & Clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area, he accepted the position as a staff chaplain at City of Hope, where he continues to serve as the Medical/Oncology and Pediatrics’ Department chaplain. He is a Board Certified Chaplain through the Association of Professional Chaplains.  He serves as the chaplain on a Program funded by the National Cancer Institute on “Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptom Concerns in Lung Cancer” and currently serves as the District Chaplaincy Director for the Los Angeles District, Church of the Nazarene. He served as a chaplain on an Archstone Foundation-funded “Demonstration Project for Improving the Quality of Spiritual Care” and currently serves as Co-Investigator for the Archstone Foundation-funded “Palliative Care Communication Training for Improved Quality of Care.”  He helped author the bereavement booklet “When Someone You Love Dies: A Guide to Bereavement” (2013), now in Spanish and soon to be translated into Chinese. In 2012 Rev. Dr. Irish received the Award of Excellence from the Southern California Cancer Pain Initiative in recognition of his contribution to cancer pain relief.
Sandra L. Ragan, Ph.D is Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication, University of Oklahoma.  Serving the University of Oklahoma from 1983-2006, she held the positions of graduate director, department chair, and associate dean of the College of Arts & Sciences.  She has co-authored seven scholarly books, including Communication as Comfort:  Multiple Voices in Palliative Care and its companion volumes Dying with COMFORT: Family Illness Narratives and Early Palliative Care and Communication and Palliative Nursing. Her books and scholarly articles can be found in Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Health Communication, Communication Yearbook, and others, and focus on language in social interaction, notably in the context of health communication, especially women’s health and palliative care.  She has been writing about palliative care communication since 2003.
Lisa Kilburn, BA Project Coordinator (City of Hope) Lisa works in the Division of Nursing Research and Education at City of Hope with Drs. Ferrell and Wittenberg-Lyles. In addition to coordinating the Palliative Care Communication Training for Improved Quality of Care, she is the editorial assistant for the forthcoming Textbook of Palliative Care Communication (Oxford University Press). Her previous work included coordinating the ExCEL in Social Work program, assisting with the Textbook of Palliative Social Work (Oxford University Press, 2011) and co-authoring articles in the Journal of Cancer Education, Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care, and Research on Social Work Practice.
   
   
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

COMFORT Communication for Oncology Nurses

COMFORT Communication for Oncology Nurses

City of Hope's Division of Nursing Research and Education is presenting “COMFORTTM SM Communication for Oncology Nurses: Improving Patient-Centered Communication and Cancer Care”, a professional training program for oncology nurses funded by the National Cancer Institute. Applications are now being accepted through February 1, 2015!   Apply Now-See Application Below.
 
Currently, two courses are being offered: June 11-12 at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, CA and October 15-16 in Washington, DC. These two-day courses are free to competitively selected oncology nurse teams (two participants per team) from cancer settings across the United States. The aim of these grant-funded courses is to improve cancer care across the disease trajectory by promoting nurse communication skill development. The curriculum is appropriate for any level of learner (CEUs will be offered).
 
Using the evidence-based COMFORTTM SM Communication Curriculum, these interactive courses will include communication skills-building sessions and provide participants with a communication toolkit that includes a copy of the curriculum, books, USB of video examples with teaching guide, and additional resources. Using a goal-directed method of teaching, faculty will help teams develop three goals for implementing process improvement related to communication. To learn more about the COMFORTTM SM curriculum, research, training and resources, visit the recently launched Palliative Care Communication (PCC) Institute website: www.pccinstitute.com
 
Each selected participant will receive:
 
  • Free registration
  • Materials
  • Meals/snacks
  • Goal follow-up at 6 and 12 months post-course
  • Continuing education units (CEU)
     
APPLY NOW and Spread the Word!
 

 
COMFORTTM SM Communication for Oncology Nurses Faculty:
 
Elaine Wittenberg, Ph.D.
City of Hope
 
Betty Ferrell, Ph.D., FAAN, FPCN
City of Hope
 
Patrick Coyne, MSN, ACHPN, ACNS-BC, FAAN, FPCN
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center
 
Susan Eggly, Ph.D.
Wayne State University School of Medicine/Karmanos Cancer Institute
 
Lee Ellington, Ph.D.
Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah
 
Joy Goldsmith, Ph.D.
University of Memphis
 
Maryjo Prince-Paul, Ph.D., APRN, ACHPN, FPCN
Western Reserve University, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing
 
Sandra L. Ragan, Ph.D.
The University of Oklahoma
 
Richard L. Street, Jr. Ph.D.
Texas A&M University
Houston Center for Quality of Care, Baylor College of Medicine
 
Virginia Sun, RN, Ph.D.
City of Hope
 
 
City of Hope/Beckman Research Institute, Nursing Research & Education-Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 13380, for 13 contact hours. No partial CEs given.  You must attend entire program to receive CEs.
 
Current NRE Programs for Health Professionals

Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
For the 11th year, U.S.News & World Report has named City of Hope one of the top cancer hospitals in the country.

Learn more about
City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
 


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  • When it comes to research into the treatment of hematologic cancers, City of Hope scientists stand out. One study that  they presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology suggests a new standard of care for HIV-associated lymphoma, another offers promise for the treatment of re...
  • Patients with HIV-associated lymphoma may soon have increased access to the current standard of care for some non-HIV infected patients – autologous stem cell transplants. Impressive new data, presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Francisco, indicate that HIV-...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the Rose Parade is “Inspiring Stories.”...
  • The holidays can create an overwhelming urge to give to people in need — especially to sick children and families spending the holidays in a hospital room. That’s a good thing. Holiday donations of toys and gifts can bolster the spirits, and improve the lives, of people affected by illness, and hospitals ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Here...
  • Cancer has a way of “talking” to the immune system and corrupting it to work on its own behalf instead of defending the body. Blocking this communication would allow the immune system to see cancer cells for what they are – something to be fought off – and stop them from growing. A breakthrough Scientists [R...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” By V...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” The ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” In 2...