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Hematology-oncology Fellowship Program

Welcome to one of the premiere hematology-oncology fellowship programs on the west coast. As an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center and a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, City of Hope offers fellows the opportunity to explore a large spectrum of research endeavors while receiving clinical training from nationally recognized mentors in hematology and oncology.
 
We encourage prospective fellows to peruse our website to gather more information about this exceptional program.
 
To experience the program firsthand, contact us to schedule a tour — our current fellows demonstrate an enthusiasm for the program that is unmatched.
 

Program Overview

City of Hope's Hematology-Oncology Fellowship Program has been ACGME-accredited since the mid-1970's. It was the last free-standing fellowship independent of an internal medicine training program until its affiliation with Harbor-UCLA Internal Medicine. The strengths of this fellowship have always been the diverse and viability of patient populations, the excellent accessibility to faculty teaching and opportunity for fellows to participate in and write clinical trials. Graduates excel in both clinical oncology skills and academic training to be able to thrive in either private or academic practice.
 
Program Requirements

In the first year of fellowship, the emphasis is placed on acquiring a knowledge base of solid tumor oncology, both in the outpatient and inpatient settings. In addition, there is an early exposure to bone marrow transplantation.

The experience shifts towards a significant amount of research time during the second year. Six months are spent in the continuity hematology-oncology clinics at Harbor-UCLA. A portion of this time is also reserved for work on the general hematology consult service. Harbor-UCLA offers excellent preparation for board certification in hematology.

In the third year, fellows have an opportunity to participate in elective rotations and continued research. Fellows are afforded the opportunity to explore oncology-related research opportunities during their dedicated research months. City of Hope provides fellows with many avenues for both for clinical and basic science research. Fellows have pursued a diverse array of projects in the past and have earned numerous distinctions in the process, including national awards at American Society of Hematology (ASH) and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
 
Educational Activities
 
There are several educational activities that have been put in place to enhance education and help develop our fellows into independent researchers and future striving academicians.
 
  • Weekly subspecialty tumor boards include breast, gastrointestinal cancer, thoracic, genitourinary, head and neck cancers, and rare tumors. Challenging clinical cases are discussed in a multidisciplinary setting that includes medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology, pathology, radiology, and other ancillary services.
  • Fellow case presentations are conducted on an every two-week basis. Hematology and oncology fellows present either a hematology or medical oncology case from their clinics and discuss management options. Presentations are attended by numerous faculty members and is moderated by faculty whose subspecialty covers the topic of presentation.
  • Journal Club is conducted on an every two-week basis. A practice-changing clinical trial, or alternatively a high-impact translational study, is presented by one of the fellows in the presence of several clinical faculty members, basic scientists, and a biostatistician. A critical overview of the rationale, methodology, result section, and clinical conclusion is conducted.
  • Didactic lectures are conducted on a weekly basis and cover all pertinent topics in medical oncology and hematology.
  • Since 2014, a board review course for hematology and oncology is now offered to all Hematology-Oncology fellows. This is conducted throughout the 3-year of fellowship. One topic is covered every 2-weeks.
  • All Hematology-Oncology fellows are expected to attend the Clinical Research Methodology course. Successful completion of this course will result in Clinical Research Methodology Certification at the completion of fellowship.

     
How to Apply
 
Please take note of important deadline dates for the fellowship application process as listed in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS).

Apply to: Harbor-COH program, Hematology and Oncology/Research (Code: 1067155F0).

Please note that the application for the City of Hope track is not distinct from the Harbor-UCLA/Kaiser track. However, at the time you are selected for interview, you will be offered a choice of either of the two programs (or both, at the discretion of the selection committee). Be sure to apply in a timely fashion.

 

 

Recommended Resources

City of Hope utilizes a variety of Web-based learning tools in their standard curriculum. Most faculty members at City of Hope participate in site specific treatment guidelines committees for the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), which has come to establish the standard of care for a variety of malignancies. These and other Web resources are essential for today’s oncologist. Printed and electronic versions of numerous journals are available through City of Hope's Graff Library.
 
As stated previously, the NCCN guidelines are regarded as standard of care in the treatment of most malignancies. Refer to the clinican's site of this Web resource for straightforward algorithms and detailed didactics.
 
Fellows will regularly participate in journal club reviews of clinical trials published in this journal and in other prominent oncology publications. Electronic access is available to fellows through the Graff Library.
 
Connect to ASCO to find the latest clinical trial abstracts of relevance to your patients. City of Hope fellows have regularly earned honors for their presentations at ASCO Annual Meetings.
 
During the Harbor-UCLA experience, fellows are immersed in a plethora of amazing hematology cases. Refer to the ASH Web site to obtain up-to-date abstracts for your patients.
 
City of Hope is highly regarded throughout the community for its exceptional work in bringing the latest research to community clinicians. These activities are excellent learning opportunities for current fellows.
 
City of Hope encourages enrollment of all suitable patients in active clinical trials. City of Hope stands as one of the most active members of the Southwest Oncology Group and other national consortiums. Fellows gain valuable experience in clinical trial participation.
 

Oncology Rotations

Inpatient
 
City of Hope pilots a ward system to enhance the inpatient experience for fellows. The ward system   team combines one attending, one fellow and one physician extender (either a nurse practitioner or physician assistant) to manage the solid oncology service. Throughout the solid oncology service, fellows have one-on-one teaching in either one of several key areas of inpatient oncology through organized didactics led by teaching faculty.

The inpatient service focuses on the management of acute complications of cancer (oncological emergencies) and the management of acute complications of treatment. In addition, the service provides exposure to high risk inpatient chemotherapy and biological therapies (high dose IL-2, high dose methotrexate, intraperitoneal chemotherapy, ifosfamide-based chemotherapy)
 
 
Outpatient
 
The outpatient experience in oncology at City of Hope has always been one of the highlights of the program. The system is built to allow continuity of care and, during the course of the year, fellows accumulate a large roster of their own patients for whom they are responsible. The Harbor outpatient continuity clinic is a multispecialty medical oncology clinic that simulates a general medical oncology practice. Fellows take the primary responsibility of caring for their continuity patient for the full three years of fellowship.
 
City of Hope outpatient medical oncology rotations include a six-month block with a focus on multispecialty clinics. These rotations allow for a focused exposure on gastrointestinal cancers, thoracic malignancies, genitourinary malignancies, breast cancer, and rare tumors (soft tissue, melanoma, endocrine, brain). Throughout these rotations, fellows are paired with nationally a renowned subspecialized medical oncologist and are exposed to leading-edge teaching and clinical research.

The outpatient experience also allows for experience in clinical trial enrollment. City of Hope is a contributor to several large cancer research consortiums, including the Southwest Oncology Group and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

Please take note of important dates listed in the Electronic Residency Application Service ( ERAS ) application for deadlines for the fellowship application process.

 


 
How to Apply
Apply to: Harbor-COH program, Hematology and Oncology/Research (Code: 1067155F0).

Please note that the application for the City of Hope track is not distinct from the Harbor-UCLA/Kaiser track. However, at the time you are selected for interview, you will be offered a choice of either of the two programs (or both, at the discretion of the selection committee). Be sure to apply in a timely fashion.

 

 

Hematology Rotation

The hematology rotation of the program will provide extensive training in malignant hematology over a 6 to 12 month period. The fellows will learn about the diagnosis and management of acute leukemias and lymphomas. They will present cases at the multidiscplinary leukemia and lymphoma conferences and work closely with the hematopathologists.

The rotation also allows fellows the unique opportunity to have extensive exposure to stem cell transplantation. As City of Hope is one of the largest hematopoietic cell transplantation programs, this rotation allows fellows the unique opportunity to be involved in the evaluation of new patients referred for transplant and the management of acute complications of stem cell transplantation. Fellows will gain experience in bone marrow harvesting, techniques for stem cell mobilization, and learn how to use HLA typing to evaluate potential donors. Fellows will also gain experience in the diagnosis, staging and management of acute and chronic graft versus host disease.
 

 
How to Apply
Please take note of important dates listed in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application to recognize deadlines for the fellowship application process.

Apply to: Harbor-COH program, Hematology and Oncology/Research (Code: 1067155F0).

Please note that the application for the City of Hope track is not distinct from the Harbor-UCLA/Kaiser track. However, at the time you are selected for interview, you will be offered a choice of either of the two programs (or both, at the discretion of the selection committee). Be sure to apply in a timely fashion.

 

 

Hematology-oncology Fellowship Program

Hematology-oncology Fellowship Program

Welcome to one of the premiere hematology-oncology fellowship programs on the west coast. As an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center and a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, City of Hope offers fellows the opportunity to explore a large spectrum of research endeavors while receiving clinical training from nationally recognized mentors in hematology and oncology.
 
We encourage prospective fellows to peruse our website to gather more information about this exceptional program.
 
To experience the program firsthand, contact us to schedule a tour — our current fellows demonstrate an enthusiasm for the program that is unmatched.
 

Program Overview

Program Overview

City of Hope's Hematology-Oncology Fellowship Program has been ACGME-accredited since the mid-1970's. It was the last free-standing fellowship independent of an internal medicine training program until its affiliation with Harbor-UCLA Internal Medicine. The strengths of this fellowship have always been the diverse and viability of patient populations, the excellent accessibility to faculty teaching and opportunity for fellows to participate in and write clinical trials. Graduates excel in both clinical oncology skills and academic training to be able to thrive in either private or academic practice.
 
Program Requirements

In the first year of fellowship, the emphasis is placed on acquiring a knowledge base of solid tumor oncology, both in the outpatient and inpatient settings. In addition, there is an early exposure to bone marrow transplantation.

The experience shifts towards a significant amount of research time during the second year. Six months are spent in the continuity hematology-oncology clinics at Harbor-UCLA. A portion of this time is also reserved for work on the general hematology consult service. Harbor-UCLA offers excellent preparation for board certification in hematology.

In the third year, fellows have an opportunity to participate in elective rotations and continued research. Fellows are afforded the opportunity to explore oncology-related research opportunities during their dedicated research months. City of Hope provides fellows with many avenues for both for clinical and basic science research. Fellows have pursued a diverse array of projects in the past and have earned numerous distinctions in the process, including national awards at American Society of Hematology (ASH) and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
 
Educational Activities
 
There are several educational activities that have been put in place to enhance education and help develop our fellows into independent researchers and future striving academicians.
 
  • Weekly subspecialty tumor boards include breast, gastrointestinal cancer, thoracic, genitourinary, head and neck cancers, and rare tumors. Challenging clinical cases are discussed in a multidisciplinary setting that includes medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology, pathology, radiology, and other ancillary services.
  • Fellow case presentations are conducted on an every two-week basis. Hematology and oncology fellows present either a hematology or medical oncology case from their clinics and discuss management options. Presentations are attended by numerous faculty members and is moderated by faculty whose subspecialty covers the topic of presentation.
  • Journal Club is conducted on an every two-week basis. A practice-changing clinical trial, or alternatively a high-impact translational study, is presented by one of the fellows in the presence of several clinical faculty members, basic scientists, and a biostatistician. A critical overview of the rationale, methodology, result section, and clinical conclusion is conducted.
  • Didactic lectures are conducted on a weekly basis and cover all pertinent topics in medical oncology and hematology.
  • Since 2014, a board review course for hematology and oncology is now offered to all Hematology-Oncology fellows. This is conducted throughout the 3-year of fellowship. One topic is covered every 2-weeks.
  • All Hematology-Oncology fellows are expected to attend the Clinical Research Methodology course. Successful completion of this course will result in Clinical Research Methodology Certification at the completion of fellowship.

     
How to Apply
 
Please take note of important deadline dates for the fellowship application process as listed in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS).

Apply to: Harbor-COH program, Hematology and Oncology/Research (Code: 1067155F0).

Please note that the application for the City of Hope track is not distinct from the Harbor-UCLA/Kaiser track. However, at the time you are selected for interview, you will be offered a choice of either of the two programs (or both, at the discretion of the selection committee). Be sure to apply in a timely fashion.

 

 

Recommended Resources

Recommended Resources

City of Hope utilizes a variety of Web-based learning tools in their standard curriculum. Most faculty members at City of Hope participate in site specific treatment guidelines committees for the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), which has come to establish the standard of care for a variety of malignancies. These and other Web resources are essential for today’s oncologist. Printed and electronic versions of numerous journals are available through City of Hope's Graff Library.
 
As stated previously, the NCCN guidelines are regarded as standard of care in the treatment of most malignancies. Refer to the clinican's site of this Web resource for straightforward algorithms and detailed didactics.
 
Fellows will regularly participate in journal club reviews of clinical trials published in this journal and in other prominent oncology publications. Electronic access is available to fellows through the Graff Library.
 
Connect to ASCO to find the latest clinical trial abstracts of relevance to your patients. City of Hope fellows have regularly earned honors for their presentations at ASCO Annual Meetings.
 
During the Harbor-UCLA experience, fellows are immersed in a plethora of amazing hematology cases. Refer to the ASH Web site to obtain up-to-date abstracts for your patients.
 
City of Hope is highly regarded throughout the community for its exceptional work in bringing the latest research to community clinicians. These activities are excellent learning opportunities for current fellows.
 
City of Hope encourages enrollment of all suitable patients in active clinical trials. City of Hope stands as one of the most active members of the Southwest Oncology Group and other national consortiums. Fellows gain valuable experience in clinical trial participation.
 

Oncology Rotations

Oncology Rotations

Inpatient
 
City of Hope pilots a ward system to enhance the inpatient experience for fellows. The ward system   team combines one attending, one fellow and one physician extender (either a nurse practitioner or physician assistant) to manage the solid oncology service. Throughout the solid oncology service, fellows have one-on-one teaching in either one of several key areas of inpatient oncology through organized didactics led by teaching faculty.

The inpatient service focuses on the management of acute complications of cancer (oncological emergencies) and the management of acute complications of treatment. In addition, the service provides exposure to high risk inpatient chemotherapy and biological therapies (high dose IL-2, high dose methotrexate, intraperitoneal chemotherapy, ifosfamide-based chemotherapy)
 
 
Outpatient
 
The outpatient experience in oncology at City of Hope has always been one of the highlights of the program. The system is built to allow continuity of care and, during the course of the year, fellows accumulate a large roster of their own patients for whom they are responsible. The Harbor outpatient continuity clinic is a multispecialty medical oncology clinic that simulates a general medical oncology practice. Fellows take the primary responsibility of caring for their continuity patient for the full three years of fellowship.
 
City of Hope outpatient medical oncology rotations include a six-month block with a focus on multispecialty clinics. These rotations allow for a focused exposure on gastrointestinal cancers, thoracic malignancies, genitourinary malignancies, breast cancer, and rare tumors (soft tissue, melanoma, endocrine, brain). Throughout these rotations, fellows are paired with nationally a renowned subspecialized medical oncologist and are exposed to leading-edge teaching and clinical research.

The outpatient experience also allows for experience in clinical trial enrollment. City of Hope is a contributor to several large cancer research consortiums, including the Southwest Oncology Group and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

Please take note of important dates listed in the Electronic Residency Application Service ( ERAS ) application for deadlines for the fellowship application process.

 


 
How to Apply
Apply to: Harbor-COH program, Hematology and Oncology/Research (Code: 1067155F0).

Please note that the application for the City of Hope track is not distinct from the Harbor-UCLA/Kaiser track. However, at the time you are selected for interview, you will be offered a choice of either of the two programs (or both, at the discretion of the selection committee). Be sure to apply in a timely fashion.

 

 

Hematology Rotation

Hematology Rotation

The hematology rotation of the program will provide extensive training in malignant hematology over a 6 to 12 month period. The fellows will learn about the diagnosis and management of acute leukemias and lymphomas. They will present cases at the multidiscplinary leukemia and lymphoma conferences and work closely with the hematopathologists.

The rotation also allows fellows the unique opportunity to have extensive exposure to stem cell transplantation. As City of Hope is one of the largest hematopoietic cell transplantation programs, this rotation allows fellows the unique opportunity to be involved in the evaluation of new patients referred for transplant and the management of acute complications of stem cell transplantation. Fellows will gain experience in bone marrow harvesting, techniques for stem cell mobilization, and learn how to use HLA typing to evaluate potential donors. Fellows will also gain experience in the diagnosis, staging and management of acute and chronic graft versus host disease.
 

 
How to Apply
Please take note of important dates listed in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application to recognize deadlines for the fellowship application process.

Apply to: Harbor-COH program, Hematology and Oncology/Research (Code: 1067155F0).

Please note that the application for the City of Hope track is not distinct from the Harbor-UCLA/Kaiser track. However, at the time you are selected for interview, you will be offered a choice of either of the two programs (or both, at the discretion of the selection committee). Be sure to apply in a timely fashion.

 

 
Fellowships and Residencies
City of Hope offers a number of exciting fellowships and residencies in laboratory cancer and diabetes research, administration, clinical applications and other areas.

City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
Students and professionals at City of Hope can access a plethora of medical databases, scientific journals, course materials, special collections, and other useful resources at our 12,000 square foot Lee Graff Library.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


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