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Lymphoma Research and Care: New Treatments Start With Clinical Trials

The Toni Stephenson Lymphoma Center at City of Hope has long been a leader in lymphoma research. Our research projects have been funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and many other research-based organizations, and our scientists collaborate with other leading research institutions to develop tomorrow’s breakthroughs today.
 
With our extensive program of lymphoma clinical trials, City of Hope can provide our patients access to novel therapies, including many that are not available elsewhere.
 
and  Christine Brown, Ph.D., associate director of the T-cell Immunotherapy Laboratory, have opened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA )- approved clinical trial of an investigational drug for patients with T-cell lymphoma who are undergoing transplantation for recurrent disease, to reduce the chance of relapse. Plans are now underway to extend this promising new therapy to treat patients with B-cell lymphoma who are not undergoing transplantation. That trial is expected to begin this year.
 
Amrita Y. Krishnan, M.D., director, Multiple Myeloma Program, is leading an international clinical trial to test whether Zevalin radioimmunotherapy given prior to high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous stem cell transplantation will reduce the rate of disease recurrence and improve overall and disease-free survival in patients with aggressive lymphoma. City of Hope was the first institution to show that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation could cure patients of lymphoma who suffered from HIV infection. This has changed the standard of care for patients in the U.S. Joseph Alvarnas, M.D., associate clinical professor of hematology and hematopoietic cell transplantation is leading a national trial in the treatment of patients with lymphoma and HIV infection. He is also leading a study aimed at determining whether allogeneic (donor) transplants will cure both leukemia and HIV infection.
 
Leslie Popplewell, M.D., associate clinical professor , and Robert Chen, M.D., assistant professor, both of the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, continue to advance clinical trials of new agents that may be more effective and less toxic in treating patients with hematologic cancers. Chen led a national study of the drug brentuximab in patients with relapsed Hodgkin disease, in whom the drug produced a high rate of response. The drug was subsequently approved by the FDA. Current research is directed at assessing the efficacy of brentuximab in preparing patients for transplant, as well as in preventing posttransplant relapse.
 
 

Lymphoma Research/Clinical Trials

Lymphoma Research and Care: New Treatments Start With Clinical Trials

The Toni Stephenson Lymphoma Center at City of Hope has long been a leader in lymphoma research. Our research projects have been funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and many other research-based organizations, and our scientists collaborate with other leading research institutions to develop tomorrow’s breakthroughs today.
 
With our extensive program of lymphoma clinical trials, City of Hope can provide our patients access to novel therapies, including many that are not available elsewhere.
 
and  Christine Brown, Ph.D., associate director of the T-cell Immunotherapy Laboratory, have opened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA )- approved clinical trial of an investigational drug for patients with T-cell lymphoma who are undergoing transplantation for recurrent disease, to reduce the chance of relapse. Plans are now underway to extend this promising new therapy to treat patients with B-cell lymphoma who are not undergoing transplantation. That trial is expected to begin this year.
 
Amrita Y. Krishnan, M.D., director, Multiple Myeloma Program, is leading an international clinical trial to test whether Zevalin radioimmunotherapy given prior to high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous stem cell transplantation will reduce the rate of disease recurrence and improve overall and disease-free survival in patients with aggressive lymphoma. City of Hope was the first institution to show that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation could cure patients of lymphoma who suffered from HIV infection. This has changed the standard of care for patients in the U.S. Joseph Alvarnas, M.D., associate clinical professor of hematology and hematopoietic cell transplantation is leading a national trial in the treatment of patients with lymphoma and HIV infection. He is also leading a study aimed at determining whether allogeneic (donor) transplants will cure both leukemia and HIV infection.
 
Leslie Popplewell, M.D., associate clinical professor , and Robert Chen, M.D., assistant professor, both of the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, continue to advance clinical trials of new agents that may be more effective and less toxic in treating patients with hematologic cancers. Chen led a national study of the drug brentuximab in patients with relapsed Hodgkin disease, in whom the drug produced a high rate of response. The drug was subsequently approved by the FDA. Current research is directed at assessing the efficacy of brentuximab in preparing patients for transplant, as well as in preventing posttransplant relapse.
 
 
Quick Links
A $10 million gift from Internet-publishing entrepreneurs Emmet and Toni Stephenson and their daughter Tessa Stephenson Brand will fund the creation of the Toni Stephenson Lymphoma Center at City of Hope, the cornerstone of the institution’s new Hematologic Cancers Institute.
Support Lymphoma Research
 
Support City of Hope's pioneering research that is transforming the future for patients with lymphoma. Make a gift to the Toni Stephenson Lymphoma Center at City of Hope today to help us get closer to cures. 
 
 
Hematologic Cancers Support Groups
Low-dose Tamoxifen for Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Trial
 
A clinical research study is currently underway to see if low-dose tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer in childhood, adolescent, and young adulthood cancer survivors.


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