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MoLAR Meeting

Overview
The Meeting of LA area Receptor labs (MoLAR) is an informal meeting that provides a friendly forum for exchange of ideas and new and often unpublished research. MoLAR brings together labs in the Southern California region that study related fields of gene regulation and nuclear receptor function and mechanism. The topics span a wide array of biological contexts, including metabolism, diabetes and diabetic complications, cancer, cardiovascular biology and comparative physiology. The meeting aims to provide a small and collegial environment to discuss your projects, interact and network with leading scientists and their lab groups who are involved in related fields of research. It is a great opportunity for postdoctoral fellows and doctoral trainees to receive insightful feedback on their research from experts and to discover new areas for collaboration.  We encourage participation from all labs in attendance and the presentation of both projects in early stages (15 minute “poster” talks) or more developed stories in longer format talks (25 minutes). As always, the success of the conference comes from lively participation and interaction.
 
The following laboratories participate regularly in the MoLAR meeting:
(Click on name to view PubMed references)
 
Lab Institution
Ruben Abagyan The Scripps Research Institute
David Ann City of Hope
Bruce Blumberg University of California at Irvine
Shiuan Chen City of Hope
Gerhard Coetzee University of Southern California
Andrea Hevener-Bell University of California at Los Angeles
Wendong Huang City of Hope
Janice Huss City of Hope
Chris Jamieson University of California at Los Angeles
Jeremey Jones City of Hope
Natasha Kralli The Scripps Research Institute
Katia Lamia The Scripps Research Institute
Rama Natarajan City of Hope
Enrique Saez The Scripps Research Institute
Yanhong Shi City of Hope
Frances M. Sladek University of California at Riverside
Michael Stallcup University of Southern California
Charles Stephensen University of California at Davis
Henry Sucov University of Southern California
Peter Tontonoz University of California at Los Angeles
 

Next Meeting

Next Meeting:  April 17, 2015
Registration Deadline: April 10, 2015
Guest Speaker: Thomas P. Burris, Ph.D. (Professor & Chair, Saint Louis University)
 
Dr. Tom Burris is the William Beaumont Professor and the Chair of Pharmacological and Physiological Science at St. Louis University School of Medicine.

The Burris laboratory has focused in recent years on using chemical biology approaches to characterizing the physiological roles of orphan nuclear receptors.  They hope to discover novel drugs targeting these nuclear receptors for treatment of diseases including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's disease.   Dr. Burris has been elected as a Fellow of the AHA and to AAAS “for outstanding research contributions to the field of nuclear receptor action and pharmacology, particularly in the area of chemical biology of orphan nuclear receptors.

Title of Presentation:
 
Program
Welcome/Breakfast (10:00 am)
Platt #3 Conference Room
 
 
 
Future Meetings: April, 2016

Meeting Location and Directions

Location:
City of Hope
Platt #3 Conference Room
1500 E. Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010
 
Directions:
City of Hope is located in Duarte just off the 210 freeway, one exit west of the junction of the 210 and 605 freeways. Exit the 210 freeway at Buena Vista and proceed south toward Duarte Road. Turn left onto Duarte Road and proceed east for 0.4 miles, passing an entrance labeled Beckman Research Institute. Use the main entrance which has a guard booth. Ask at the guard booth for parking instructions. The meeting is held in Platt #3 Conference Room. 
 
Click here for a campus map and personalized directions to City of Hope.
 

Registration and AV Info

Registration Fees
$55 - Physician/Scientist/Industry Professional
 
The next MoLAR meeting is scheduled for Friday, April 17, 2015.  To participate, please register by April 10, 2015.  

Please, no late payments or payments at the door.  We need an accurate head count for facilities and meals. Thank you.
 
How to Register
Online: Please visit https://cme.cityofhope.org/eventinfo_5690.html
 
Cancellation and Refund Policy
Unlike most meetings, the MoLAR registration deadline is extremely close to the meeting date. As a result, charges are immediately incurred upon registration and refunds will not be granted.
 
Audio Visual Information
Please bring your Powerpoint presentations on a CD or USB flash drive. There is no need to bring your own computer. In fact, we want to avoid the complications associated with linking individual computers to the projector. All other equipment should be requested well in advance.
 
Questions?
Sarah Tomeck
Phone: 626-256-4673, ext. 62833
Fax: 626-301-8136
 
 
 
 
 

Confidentiality

Presentations at the MoLAR meeting include new and unpublished results. In order to preserve this spirit, all unpublished information that is presented or discussed is considered confidential. By attending the meeting, all participants agree not to discuss or disclose any unpublished information with those who are not present at the meeting or those who are not immediate members of their lab. Such information will remain confidential until the information (1) has been published or presented publicly or (2) the speaker has given permission to discuss the information.

MoLAR

MoLAR Meeting

Overview
The Meeting of LA area Receptor labs (MoLAR) is an informal meeting that provides a friendly forum for exchange of ideas and new and often unpublished research. MoLAR brings together labs in the Southern California region that study related fields of gene regulation and nuclear receptor function and mechanism. The topics span a wide array of biological contexts, including metabolism, diabetes and diabetic complications, cancer, cardiovascular biology and comparative physiology. The meeting aims to provide a small and collegial environment to discuss your projects, interact and network with leading scientists and their lab groups who are involved in related fields of research. It is a great opportunity for postdoctoral fellows and doctoral trainees to receive insightful feedback on their research from experts and to discover new areas for collaboration.  We encourage participation from all labs in attendance and the presentation of both projects in early stages (15 minute “poster” talks) or more developed stories in longer format talks (25 minutes). As always, the success of the conference comes from lively participation and interaction.
 
The following laboratories participate regularly in the MoLAR meeting:
(Click on name to view PubMed references)
 
Lab Institution
Ruben Abagyan The Scripps Research Institute
David Ann City of Hope
Bruce Blumberg University of California at Irvine
Shiuan Chen City of Hope
Gerhard Coetzee University of Southern California
Andrea Hevener-Bell University of California at Los Angeles
Wendong Huang City of Hope
Janice Huss City of Hope
Chris Jamieson University of California at Los Angeles
Jeremey Jones City of Hope
Natasha Kralli The Scripps Research Institute
Katia Lamia The Scripps Research Institute
Rama Natarajan City of Hope
Enrique Saez The Scripps Research Institute
Yanhong Shi City of Hope
Frances M. Sladek University of California at Riverside
Michael Stallcup University of Southern California
Charles Stephensen University of California at Davis
Henry Sucov University of Southern California
Peter Tontonoz University of California at Los Angeles
 

Next Meeting

Next Meeting

Next Meeting:  April 17, 2015
Registration Deadline: April 10, 2015
Guest Speaker: Thomas P. Burris, Ph.D. (Professor & Chair, Saint Louis University)
 
Dr. Tom Burris is the William Beaumont Professor and the Chair of Pharmacological and Physiological Science at St. Louis University School of Medicine.

The Burris laboratory has focused in recent years on using chemical biology approaches to characterizing the physiological roles of orphan nuclear receptors.  They hope to discover novel drugs targeting these nuclear receptors for treatment of diseases including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's disease.   Dr. Burris has been elected as a Fellow of the AHA and to AAAS “for outstanding research contributions to the field of nuclear receptor action and pharmacology, particularly in the area of chemical biology of orphan nuclear receptors.

Title of Presentation:
 
Program
Welcome/Breakfast (10:00 am)
Platt #3 Conference Room
 
 
 
Future Meetings: April, 2016

Meeting Location & Directions

Meeting Location and Directions

Location:
City of Hope
Platt #3 Conference Room
1500 E. Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010
 
Directions:
City of Hope is located in Duarte just off the 210 freeway, one exit west of the junction of the 210 and 605 freeways. Exit the 210 freeway at Buena Vista and proceed south toward Duarte Road. Turn left onto Duarte Road and proceed east for 0.4 miles, passing an entrance labeled Beckman Research Institute. Use the main entrance which has a guard booth. Ask at the guard booth for parking instructions. The meeting is held in Platt #3 Conference Room. 
 
Click here for a campus map and personalized directions to City of Hope.
 

Registration & AV Info

Registration and AV Info

Registration Fees
$55 - Physician/Scientist/Industry Professional
 
The next MoLAR meeting is scheduled for Friday, April 17, 2015.  To participate, please register by April 10, 2015.  

Please, no late payments or payments at the door.  We need an accurate head count for facilities and meals. Thank you.
 
How to Register
Online: Please visit https://cme.cityofhope.org/eventinfo_5690.html
 
Cancellation and Refund Policy
Unlike most meetings, the MoLAR registration deadline is extremely close to the meeting date. As a result, charges are immediately incurred upon registration and refunds will not be granted.
 
Audio Visual Information
Please bring your Powerpoint presentations on a CD or USB flash drive. There is no need to bring your own computer. In fact, we want to avoid the complications associated with linking individual computers to the projector. All other equipment should be requested well in advance.
 
Questions?
Sarah Tomeck
Phone: 626-256-4673, ext. 62833
Fax: 626-301-8136
 
 
 
 
 

Confidentiality

Confidentiality

Presentations at the MoLAR meeting include new and unpublished results. In order to preserve this spirit, all unpublished information that is presented or discussed is considered confidential. By attending the meeting, all participants agree not to discuss or disclose any unpublished information with those who are not present at the meeting or those who are not immediate members of their lab. Such information will remain confidential until the information (1) has been published or presented publicly or (2) the speaker has given permission to discuss the information.
Research Videos
Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Technology & Licensing
The Center for Applied Technology Development offers broad expertise in
technology transfer and licensing, biologics manufacturing, quality assurance and regulatory affairs.

City of Hope offers a number of exciting fellowships and residencies in laboratory research, administration, clinical applications and other areas.


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