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Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Core

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Core
The main focus of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Core facility is to apply high resolution NMR spectroscopy to the structural characterization of biomolecules, small organic compounds, natural products, and biomolecular complexes including protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid and protein-ligand complexes.
 
Publications
The following representative publications demonstrate some capabilities of the NMR facility:
 
Wang J, Hu W, Cai S, Lee B, Song J, Chen Y.
The intrinsic affinity between E2 and the Cys domain of E1 in ubiquitin-like modifications. Mol Cell. 2007 Jul 20;27(2):228-37.
 
Chen CJ, Kirshner J, Sherman MA, Hu W, Nguyen T, Shively JE.
Mutation analysis of the short cytoplasmic domain of the cell-cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1 identifies residues that orchestrate actin binding and lumen formation. J Biol Chem. 2007 Feb 23;282(8):5749-60.
 
Cai S, Seu C, Kovacs Z, Sherry AD, Chen Y.
Sensitivity enhancement of multidimensional NMR experiments by paramagnetic relaxation effects. J Am Chem Soc. 2006 Oct 18;128(41):13474-8.
 
Eng ET, Ye J, Williams D, Phung S, Moore RE, Young MK, Gruntmanis U, Braunstein G, Chen S.
Suppression of estrogen biosynthesis by procyanidin dimers in red wine and grape seeds. Cancer Res. 2003 63(23): 8516-22. PMID: 14679019
 
Yu DD, Forman BM.
Simple and efficient production of (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, a potent estrogen receptor modulator. J Org Chem. 2003 Nov 28;68(24):9489-91.
 

Abstract

The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Core is located in the Hilton Building, Room 123. The main focus of this core is to apply high resolution NMR spectroscopy to the structural characterization of biomolecules, small organic compounds, natural products, and biomolecular complexes including protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid and protein-ligand complexes.

 

NMR spectroscopy provides the structural information on the atomic resolution. NMR can be used in the structural characterization of biomolecules, small organic compounds, natural products, and biomolecular complexes including protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid and protein-ligand complexes.

 

The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Core has a 600 MHz Bruker Avance NMR instrument that is equipped with four channels, a TXI cryo-probe and a room temperature probe. This instrument is mainly used for biomolecular characterization. The facility also has a 500 MHz NMR instrument that has a refurbished 500 MHz Oxford magnet equipped with a Bruker Avance console. This instrument is equipped with three different probes and an auto-sample changer. Both 500 and 600 MHz instruments have pulse-shaping capability on three channels, and have 2H decoupling capabilities. Both NMR instruments are equipped with HP PC workstations running the Linux operating system. The xwinnmr version 3.5 is used to operate the NMR instruments. All NMR Core related equipment is constantly managed and well maintained.

 

Pricing

Prices and availability vary. Please Contact Us for current information.
 
If you are a CIty of Hope employee, please click here for pricing.
 

Scheduling Equipment

Scheduling of the 500 MHz is on a first come first serve basis for routine usage with experimental times less than 3 hours. For usage of more than 3 hours, users should send a request to the facility manager by noon on the Monday before the experiment in order to book the time for that week. If the facility Manager is not available, users can send requests to Dr. Yuan Chen for scheduling. The facility manager or Dr. Yuan Chen will put the schedule on the web calendar after receiving the requests.
 
The 600 MHz is dedicated to biomolecular studies because of the resolution and TROSY effect associated with higher field strength for large molecules. Since most of the experiments on the 600 MHz are long, scheduling will be made on a monthly basis, and the longest period that can be booked is two weeks. The required experimental time with biomolecular studies is less predictable, and therefore, the facility manager needs to work closely with the user in order to make effective usage of 600 MHz. Users need to send requests to the facility manager or Dr. Yuan Chen if the facility manager is not available during the first three-day period of that month to reserve the instrumental time for that month.
 
City of Hope users can find the schedule by going to Microsoft Outlook and clicking on Calendar->Folder List->Public folders->NMR Usage->500 MHz/600 MHz.

Services and Equipment

Services
The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance core manager acquires routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra for the occasional user. Training ourses tailored for routine users’ specific needs are provided by the facility manager. The facility manager is also available for help with setting up NMR experiments and assistance with software related to NMR data processing and analysis.
 
Equipment
 
600 MHz Bruker Avance NMR Instrument
The 600 MHz Bruker Avance NMR instrument is equipped with four channels, a TXI cryo-probe, and a room temperature probe. This instrument is mainly used for biomolecular characterization.
   
500 MHz NMR Instrument
The 500 MHz NMR instrument has a refurbished 500 MHz Oxford magnet equipped with a Bruker Avance console. This instrument is equipped with three different probes and an auto-sample changer. The automatic sample changer holds up to 24 samples for sequential automated data collection. The broadband observe probe (BBO) has a broadband coil tunable from 109Ag to 31P, including an actively shielded Z-gradient coil. The BBO probe is ideal for direct observation of nuclei other than 1H. The micro triple resonance (1H/13C/15N) probe is ideal for natural product characterization. The active volume of the probe is 2.5 μl, and the optimal sample volume is 5 μl. The third probe is a triple resonance (1H/13C/15N) probe with triple-axis gradients for biomolecular study. The instrument is used to characterize organic compounds, natural products, and also has the capability for use in biomolecular structural studies.

 
Both 500 and 600 MHz instruments have pulse-shaping capability on three channels and have 2H decoupling capabilities. Both NMR instruments are equipped with HP PC workstations running the Linux operating system. The xwinnmr version 3.5 is used to operate the NMR instruments.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
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By giving to City of Hope, you support breakthrough discoveries in laboratory research that translate into lifesaving treatments for patients with cancer and other serious diseases.
 
 
 
 
Media Inquiries/Social Media

For media inquiries contact:

Dominique Grignetti
800-888-5323
dgrignetti@coh.org

 

For sponsorships inquiries please contact:

Stefanie Sprester
213-241-7160
ssprester@coh.org

Christine Nassr
213-241-7112
cnassr@coh.org

 
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