A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Entrepreneurs Corner Bookmark and Share

Start-Up Guide

Getting Started
Starting a life science company from your research is certainly not for the faint of heart. It is not uncommon for a life science entrepreneur to work 80-120 hours per week. Furthermore, the entrepreneur must wear several different “hats”, including the hat of a scientist, executive decision-maker and janitor. There is a significant amount of risk associated with starting a life science company around your research; however, with great risk comes the potential for great reward. The OTL is here to guide you through the earliest stages of your company and discuss the various options and resources available to the aspiring life science entrepreneur.

Laying the Groundwork
Building a solid foundation is essential for a start-up company. This includes writing a business plan, developing the appropriate legal structure for the start-up company and hiring the right people. The OTL can put you in touch with the right resources and people to start the process. Finding ample and affordable wet lab space can also present a challenge for a burgeoning life science start-up company. Fortunately, the OTL has fostered relationships with several local incubators that offer wet lab space at a reasonable cost. Please follow the links provided or contact the OTL for more information.

Conflict of Interest
If you plan to maintain your position and tenure as a City of Hope employee while creating your start-up company, you must first present your case to the City of Hope Conflict of Interest (COI) committee. The purpose and goal of the COI committee is to identify ways to facilitate the start of a new company while managing any conflicts it may present vis-à-vis your duties as a City of Hope employee. The OTL can direct you to the appropriate COI committee members when you and your company are ready.

Raising Capital
One of the most difficult challenges faced by aspiring life science companies is finding and securing adequate funding. A start-up company should consider all options, including the “3 Fs” (friends, family and fools), private angel or venture capital investors, institutional investors, pharmaceutical company-based investment funds and even government-based, non-diluting grants such as those offered through the SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) program. The amount of funding available from any investor will be limited, which requires investors to choose very carefully in which companies they invest. The burden of convincing investors that a company represents a solid investment opportunity falls squarely on the entrepreneur. The OTL is here to connect you to the appropriate people and organizations when the company is ready for a “pitch” to investors.

Building a Team
A successful company must assemble a team of high caliber, highly energetic individuals to perform key tasks and manage operations, including a CEO and COO. A talented and reliable attorney is an invaluable asset to a life science start-up. Forming a scientific advisory board is a good idea to guide the scientific direction of the company in its nascent stages. Having the right people on the scientific advisory board can tremendously improve visibility and focus the scientific efforts of the company. The latter is especially important at the earliest stages of a company’s development.

Entrepreneurs Corner

Start-Up Guide

Getting Started
Starting a life science company from your research is certainly not for the faint of heart. It is not uncommon for a life science entrepreneur to work 80-120 hours per week. Furthermore, the entrepreneur must wear several different “hats”, including the hat of a scientist, executive decision-maker and janitor. There is a significant amount of risk associated with starting a life science company around your research; however, with great risk comes the potential for great reward. The OTL is here to guide you through the earliest stages of your company and discuss the various options and resources available to the aspiring life science entrepreneur.

Laying the Groundwork
Building a solid foundation is essential for a start-up company. This includes writing a business plan, developing the appropriate legal structure for the start-up company and hiring the right people. The OTL can put you in touch with the right resources and people to start the process. Finding ample and affordable wet lab space can also present a challenge for a burgeoning life science start-up company. Fortunately, the OTL has fostered relationships with several local incubators that offer wet lab space at a reasonable cost. Please follow the links provided or contact the OTL for more information.

Conflict of Interest
If you plan to maintain your position and tenure as a City of Hope employee while creating your start-up company, you must first present your case to the City of Hope Conflict of Interest (COI) committee. The purpose and goal of the COI committee is to identify ways to facilitate the start of a new company while managing any conflicts it may present vis-à-vis your duties as a City of Hope employee. The OTL can direct you to the appropriate COI committee members when you and your company are ready.

Raising Capital
One of the most difficult challenges faced by aspiring life science companies is finding and securing adequate funding. A start-up company should consider all options, including the “3 Fs” (friends, family and fools), private angel or venture capital investors, institutional investors, pharmaceutical company-based investment funds and even government-based, non-diluting grants such as those offered through the SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) program. The amount of funding available from any investor will be limited, which requires investors to choose very carefully in which companies they invest. The burden of convincing investors that a company represents a solid investment opportunity falls squarely on the entrepreneur. The OTL is here to connect you to the appropriate people and organizations when the company is ready for a “pitch” to investors.

Building a Team
A successful company must assemble a team of high caliber, highly energetic individuals to perform key tasks and manage operations, including a CEO and COO. A talented and reliable attorney is an invaluable asset to a life science start-up. Forming a scientific advisory board is a good idea to guide the scientific direction of the company in its nascent stages. Having the right people on the scientific advisory board can tremendously improve visibility and focus the scientific efforts of the company. The latter is especially important at the earliest stages of a company’s development.

Entrepreneurs Bookshelf

Overview
Office of Technology Licensing
City of Hope
1500 E. Duarte Rd.
Modular 101
Duarte, CA 91010
 
 
 
Center for Applied Technology Development (CATD)
The Sylvia R. and Isador A. Deutch Center for Applied Technology Development (CATD) offers broad expertise in technology transfer and licensing, biologics manufacturing, quality assurance and regulatory affairs.

City of Hope Campus Map
 
 
 
 
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
NEWS & UPDATES
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free. In his first post, ...
  • Advanced age tops the list among breast cancer risk factor for women. Not far behind is family history and genetics. Two City of Hope researchers delving deep into these issues recently received important grants to advance their studies. Arti Hurria, M.D., director of the Cancer and Aging Research Program, and ...
  • City of Hope is extending the reach of its lifesaving mission well beyond U.S. borders. To that end, three distinguished City of Hope leaders visited China earlier this year to lay the foundation for the institution’s new International Medicine Program. The program is part of City of Hope’s strategi...
  • A hallmark of cancer is that it doesn’t always limit itself to a primary location. It spreads. Breast cancer and lung cancer in particular are prone to spread, or metastasize, to the brain. Often the brain metastasis isn’t discovered until years after the initial diagnosis, just when patients were beginning to ...
  • Blueberries, cinnamon, baikal scullcap, grape seed extract (and grape skin extract), mushrooms, barberry, pomegranates … all contain compounds with the potential to treat, or prevent, cancer. Scientists at City of Hope have found tantalizing evidence of this potential and are determined to explore it to t...
  • Most women who are treated for breast cancer with a mastectomy do not choose to undergo reconstructive surgery. The reasons for this, according to a recent JAMA Surgery study, vary. Nearly half say they do not want any additional surgery, while nearly 34 percent say breast cancer reconstruction simply isn’t imp...
  • The leading risk factor for breast cancer is simply being a woman. The second top risk factor is getting older. Obviously, these two factors cannot be controlled, which is why all women should be aware of their risk and how to minimize those risks. Many risk factors can be mitigated, and simple changes can lead...
  • All women are at some risk of developing the disease in their lifetimes, but breast cancer, like other cancers, has a disproportionate effect on minorities. Although white women have the highest incidence of breast cancer, African-American women have the highest breast cancer death rates of all racial and ethni...
  • First, the good news: HIV infections have dropped dramatically over the past 30 years. Doctors, researchers and health officials have made great strides in preventing and treating the disease, turning what was once a death sentence into, for some, a chronic condition. Now, the reality check: HIV is still a worl...
  • Screening for breast cancer has dramatically increased the number of cancers found before they cause symptoms – catching the disease when it is most treatable and curable. Mammograms, however, are not infallible. It’s important to conduct self-exams, and know the signs and symptoms that should be checked by a h...
  • Rob Darakjian was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at just 19 years old. He began chemotherapy and was in and out of the hospital for four months. After his fourth round of treatment, he received a bone marrow transplantation from an anonymous donor. Today, he’s cancer free.   In his previ...
  • In a single day, former professional triathlete Lisa Birk learned she couldn’t have children and that she had breast cancer. “Where do you go from there?” she asks. For Birk, who swims three miles, runs 10 miles and cycles every day, the answer  ultimately was a decision to take control of her cancer care. Afte...
  • More and more people are surviving cancer, thanks to advanced cancer treatments and screening tools. Today there are nearly 14.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. But in up to 20 percent of cancer patients, the disease ultimately spreads to their brain. Each year, nearly 170,000 new cases of brain ...
  • Cancer cells are masters of survival. Despite excessive damage to their most basic workings and the constant vigilance of the body’s immune system, they manage to persevere. Much of this extraordinary ability to survive falls under the control of proteins bearing the name STAT, short for signal transducer and a...
  • One person receives the breast cancer diagnosis, but the cancer affects the entire family. Couples, in particular, can find the diagnosis and treatment challenging, especially if they have traditional male/female communication styles. “Though every individual is unique, men and women often respond differently d...