A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Bone & Soft Tissue Cancer (Sarcoma) Bookmark and Share

Pediatric Musculoskeletal Cancer and Sarcoma Program

Every day, City of Hope treats patients of all ages – children, adolescents and adults – who are referred to us by physicians from California and throughout the U.S.
 
Children with musculoskeletal cancers find more than hope here. They and their families find expedited diagnosis and rapid treatment that begins in hours or days, not weeks. Because musculoskeletal cancers can be especially aggressive and fast-growing, our team of specialists and clinicians collaborate efficiently on the best course of treatment for each patient.
 
Treatment for these bone and soft tissue cancers combines chemotherapy and other drugs with surgery and radiation. City of Hope researchers pioneered the use of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as a treatment option for patients with advanced sarcoma, and a current study involves the use of new imaging techniques, novel radiation oncology techniques and HCT. Our approach integrates powerful new anti-cancer drugs with alternative therapies in an effort to spare patients’ limbs. We are successful in this effort in 85 percent of our cases.

We are one of the few centers in the nation that perform limb-sparing reconstruction using expandable prosthetic implants for children and adolescents. These prostheses “grow” with patients as they are expanded using noninvasive or minimally invasive techniques. This allows us to accommodate for your child’s continued growth without multiple major surgeries. Using these devices, we are able to remove bone cancer and save limbs, while at the same time reducing the number of surgeries and improving recovery time.
 
As part of the Pediatric Musculoskeletal Cancer and Sarcoma Program, care is provided by a multidisciplinary team of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists who work together with pathologists, radiologists, rehabilitation experts and others to achieve the best possible outcomes for patients. To help patients and families adjust during treatment and rehabilitation, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers and child life specialists provide psychosocial support. Our team includes:

Judith K. Sato, M.D., director
George T. Calvert, M.D.
Dominic Femino, M.D.
James S. Miser, M.D.
Helen Mormann, F.N.P.
Margarita Munoz, PA-C
Amy Tafel, M.S.W.

A unique benefit of being treated at City of Hope is that we treat patients of all ages in our musculoskeletal program. If your child relapses or requires continued treatment or follow-up into adulthood, your family can stay with a team you know and trust, providing greater continuity of care.

As one of a handful of institutes to attain the elite designation of  Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), City of Hope is acknowledged as a leader in cancer research and treatment. Here, your child has access to innovative clinical trials, researchers and physicians who are nationally recognized experts in developing novel methods for preventing, detecting and treating soft tissue sarcoma and bone cancer. We are actively developing tomorrow’s treatments today, and our musculoskeletal investigators are collaborating with other scientists in other disciplines to develop promising new treatments.
 
For more information about our musculoskeletal treatments and research, visit our Musculoskeletal Cancer and Sarcoma Program website.
 

Bone & Soft Tissue Cancer (Sarcoma)

Pediatric Musculoskeletal Cancer and Sarcoma Program

Every day, City of Hope treats patients of all ages – children, adolescents and adults – who are referred to us by physicians from California and throughout the U.S.
 
Children with musculoskeletal cancers find more than hope here. They and their families find expedited diagnosis and rapid treatment that begins in hours or days, not weeks. Because musculoskeletal cancers can be especially aggressive and fast-growing, our team of specialists and clinicians collaborate efficiently on the best course of treatment for each patient.
 
Treatment for these bone and soft tissue cancers combines chemotherapy and other drugs with surgery and radiation. City of Hope researchers pioneered the use of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as a treatment option for patients with advanced sarcoma, and a current study involves the use of new imaging techniques, novel radiation oncology techniques and HCT. Our approach integrates powerful new anti-cancer drugs with alternative therapies in an effort to spare patients’ limbs. We are successful in this effort in 85 percent of our cases.

We are one of the few centers in the nation that perform limb-sparing reconstruction using expandable prosthetic implants for children and adolescents. These prostheses “grow” with patients as they are expanded using noninvasive or minimally invasive techniques. This allows us to accommodate for your child’s continued growth without multiple major surgeries. Using these devices, we are able to remove bone cancer and save limbs, while at the same time reducing the number of surgeries and improving recovery time.
 
As part of the Pediatric Musculoskeletal Cancer and Sarcoma Program, care is provided by a multidisciplinary team of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists who work together with pathologists, radiologists, rehabilitation experts and others to achieve the best possible outcomes for patients. To help patients and families adjust during treatment and rehabilitation, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers and child life specialists provide psychosocial support. Our team includes:

Judith K. Sato, M.D., director
George T. Calvert, M.D.
Dominic Femino, M.D.
James S. Miser, M.D.
Helen Mormann, F.N.P.
Margarita Munoz, PA-C
Amy Tafel, M.S.W.

A unique benefit of being treated at City of Hope is that we treat patients of all ages in our musculoskeletal program. If your child relapses or requires continued treatment or follow-up into adulthood, your family can stay with a team you know and trust, providing greater continuity of care.

As one of a handful of institutes to attain the elite designation of  Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), City of Hope is acknowledged as a leader in cancer research and treatment. Here, your child has access to innovative clinical trials, researchers and physicians who are nationally recognized experts in developing novel methods for preventing, detecting and treating soft tissue sarcoma and bone cancer. We are actively developing tomorrow’s treatments today, and our musculoskeletal investigators are collaborating with other scientists in other disciplines to develop promising new treatments.
 
For more information about our musculoskeletal treatments and research, visit our Musculoskeletal Cancer and Sarcoma Program website.
 
Patient Care Overview

City of Hope Locations

Cancer Care
Clinics/Treatments/Services
As a Comprehensive Cancer Center – the highest designation given by the National Cancer Institute – we are widely regarded as a leader in cancer prevention and treatment.
 

For the 11th year, U.S.News & World Report has named City of Hope one of the top cancer hospitals in the country.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Repr...
  • When 25-year-old Angelina Mattos was diagnosed with Stage 4 oral cancer earlier this year, she learned that her only hope of survival was through the removal of her tongue, a surgery that leaves people without the ability to talk or eat normally, sometimes permanently ending their ability to speak. After hearin...
  • Two years ago, Joselyn Miller and her family sat together as stem cells from her brother’s bone marrow were infused into her – a precious gift of life that the family is excited to have the chance to pass to another patient in need. Today, the stem cell recipient is healthy. Her 23-year-old son Rex, who […...
  • Even as the overall rate of oral cancers in the United States steadily declines, the rate of tongue cancer is increasing — especially among white females ages 18 to 44. An oral cancer diagnosis, although rare, is serious. Only half of the people diagnosed with oral cancer are still alive after five years, accor...
  • Sometimes cancer found in the lungs is not lung cancer at all. It can be another type of cancer that originated elsewhere in the body and spread, or metastasized, to the lungs through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. These tumors are called lung metastases, or metastatic cancer to the lungs, and are not the...
  • When it comes to research into the treatment of hematologic cancers, City of Hope scientists stand out. One study that  they presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology suggests a new standard of care for HIV-associated lymphoma, another offers promise for the treatment of re...
  • Patients with HIV-associated lymphoma may soon have increased access to the current standard of care for some non-HIV infected patients – autologous stem cell transplants. Impressive new data, presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Francisco, indicate that HIV-...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the Rose Parade is “Inspiring Stories.”...
  • The holidays can create an overwhelming urge to give to people in need — especially to sick children and families spending the holidays in a hospital room. That’s a good thing. Holiday donations of toys and gifts can bolster the spirits, and improve the lives, of people affected by illness, and hospitals ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Here...
  • Cancer has a way of “talking” to the immune system and corrupting it to work on its own behalf instead of defending the body. Blocking this communication would allow the immune system to see cancer cells for what they are – something to be fought off – and stop them from growing. A breakthrough Scientists [R...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” By V...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” The ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” In 2...
  • You’ve done the easy stuff – braved the toy store and the Black Friday frenzy, stayed up all night trolling deals online, picked up gift cards for your colleagues at work. There’s just one gift left, the one you’ve been putting off and the one that means so much. What do you give your friend who […]