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16th Annual Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Diabetes Research Symposium

Date:
March 6 to 9, 2016
 
Location:
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Long Beach, Calif.

Presented by the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA
 
Made possible by the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope
 

Committee

Scientific Organizing Committee Members
 
Carla Greenbaum, M.D.
Benaroya Research Institute, Seattle, WA
 
David Harlan, M.D.
University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worcester, MA
 
Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair)
City of Hope, Duarte, CA
 
Olle Korsgren, M.D., Ph.D.
Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden

Rama Natarajan, Ph.D.
City of Hope, Duarte, CA

Bart Roep, M.D., Ph.D.
Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands
 
Ann Marie Schmidt, M.D.
NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY

Andrew Stewart, M.D.
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY

Robert Vigersky, M.D.
Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System, Washington, DC
 
Matthias von Herrath, M.D.
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA

Howard Zisser, M.D.
Insulet Corporation, Santa Barbara, CA
 

Registration

  Before 01/15/16 Before 02/17/16 Late/Onsite
Physician/Scientist/Industry Professional      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $ $ $
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2016 $ $ $
       
Nurse/Resident/Student/Trainee      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $ $ $
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2016 $ $ $
       
Single Day      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $ $ $
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2016 $ $ $
       
       
 
How to Register
Attendees can register for the 16th Annual Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Diabetes Research Symposium online (coming soon) via the City of Hope registration site. 
 
Attendees can also print the registration form (coming soon), complete and mail with payment to: CME Department, ATTN: CME Registration, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA, 91010 (Checks/money orders must be payable to City of Hope-Levine Riggs Symposium.)
 
City of Hope employees may contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org to register directly.
 
Cancellation Policy
Cancellations must be received in writing at levinesymposium@coh.org before February 17, 2016. Cancellations received before February 17 will receive a full refund of the registration minus a $50 administrative fee. Cancellations received on or after February 17 or no-shows will not receive a refund.
 
Special Needs
If you have any special needs you like the Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Symposium to be made aware of, please contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
Attendees Traveling to the United States
An official letter of registration to facilitate a visa application can be forwarded to any attendee upon request. The letter will be sent only to the person who has paid the registration fees. However, the invitation implies no obligation of the Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Symposium to cover accommodation, travel expenses, or other costs related to the meeting. Requests should be directed to the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
 

Abstracts and Award

 To Be Announced
 
 

Accommodations

 
 
Lodging
A block of non-smoking rooms has been reserved at Hyatt Regency Long Beach.
 
  Single/Double Rate
Standard Room $179.00 + tax
 
Special City of Hope group conference rates per day for rooms, single or double occupancy, are available. The group rate expires on Friday, February 12, 2016, therefore early hotel reservation is suggested.

 
Transportation
View driving directions and transportation services from the Long Beach airport and other surrounding areas.
 

Accreditation

City of Hope is accredited by the Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 
Disclosure
This activity has been planned and implemented in strict compliance with the Essential Elements and Policies of the ACCME. City of Hope takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.
 
Acknowledgement of Commercial Support
This educational conference is made possible, in part, through unrestricted educational grants of support. All grant supporters will be acknowledged at the conference via signage and will be listed in the program and abstract book.
 

Program

To Be Announced
 
 

Dr. Rachmiel Levine

Dr. Rachmiel Levine, known as the "Wise Owl" at City of Hope, was born on August 26, 1910 in Eastern Poland. At the age of six he suffered the loss of his mother and ten years later, his father died in an anti-Jewish riot in the Ukraine. At the age of sixteen, Rachmiel discovered that he had relatives who lived in America and attempted to relocate to the United States. Unable to obtain the visa to come to the United States, Rachmiel immigrated to Canada and was adopted by a Canadian physician. His first career choice was mathematics, but the depression of the 1930s influenced his decision to instead enter the field of medicine.
 
Rachmiel Levine received his undergraduate degree in 1932 and continued his education at McGill University, where he obtained his medical degree with honors in 1936. After medical school, he relocated to work in the field of diabetes research with Dr. Samuel Soskin at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Levine completed his internship and residency training at the Michael Reese Hospital between the years 1936-1938. From the years 1942-1960 he served as Director of the Department of Metabolism, Chairman of the Department of Medicine, and Director of Medical Education at Michael Reese Hospital. Dr. Levine later relocated to New York Medical College where he served as Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1960-1971.
 
In 1971, Dr. Rachmiel Levine became the Executive Medical Director at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California. He served as Director for eight years, and in 1984, the City of Hope honored him with the title, Deputy Director for Research Emeritus.
 
Dr. Levine's research strengths were initially illustrated in his first published paper with Dr. Samuel Soskin entitled, "The Effects of Blood-Sugar Level on Glucose Utilization". With this research study, he introduced the theory that the greater the amount of glucose present in the blood, the greater the amount that is used by the body. In 1946, he published the book entitled, "Carbohydrate Metabolism". The publication of this book helped lay the base for future diabetes studies through its concise basic science summary. In 1949, he gained the title "Father of Modern Diabetes Research" by becoming the first scientist to discover the role of insulin in glucose metabolism. While studying at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Dr. Levine and his colleagues, Dr. Samuel Soskin and Dr. Maurice Goldstein, determined "insulin's mechanical role in glucose metabolism". Contrary to the assumption that glucose molecules freely passed through the cell membrane, Dr. Levine's theory, known as the "Levine Effect" or transport theory, suggested that insulin served as the key regulatory factor for the transport of glucose into the cells. Dr. Levine theorized that insulin stimulates the transport of glucose from blood to fat/muscle cells and thus lowers blood glucose level.
 
Dr. Rachmiel Levine's greatest challenge was to prove his theory to the scientific community. To dispel the ideology that insulin only served in the chemical metabolism of glucose once inside the cell, Dr. Levine performed the following experiment. He injected dogs with galactose and then with galactose plus insulin, and measured the amount of galactose in the blood. Galactose is similar to glucose, in that it can be equally transported across the cell membrane, however once inside the cell, galactose cannot be metabolized like glucose. If successful, the test would show that galactose could only be transported across the cell membrane in the presence of insulin. Dr. Levine's tests proved that galactose collected in the cells and, as a consequence, galactose levels in the blood dropped.
Although Dr. Levine and his colleagues were able to publish their theory, it took them years to thoroughly convince the scientific community. Once accepted, Dr. Levine's theory opened up doors to a new era of hormone research.
 
Dr. Levine's research success continued at the City of Hope National Medical Center as he developed the City of Hope Diabetes Program. In 1978, Dr. Levine encouraged Dr. Arthur D. Riggs and Dr. Keiichi Itakura to genetically engineer E-coli bacteria to produce human insulin (Humulin®). This new preparation of human insulin was the first genetically engineered health care product approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and is now used by over 4 million people worldwide. Dr. Rachmiel Levine retired from City of Hope on November 15, 1991 but continued to contribute to the scientific community until the last weeks of his life. He left behind a legacy of over sixty years of diabetes research and served as mentor and advisor to many. Dr. Levine set an example for all scientists with his concept of a good scientist: "In my opinion a good research scientist needs to have endless curiosity and enormous amounts of patience, since answers in the field of research come slowly and most painfully."

Dr. Levine was married to the late Anne Gussack, a psychiatric social worker and is survived by his daughter, Judith Anne Feldman, MD, a Boston psychiatrist and his son, Daniel Saul Levine, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Rachmiel Levine died in Boston, Massachusetts on February 24, 1998, but will be remembered for his great contributions to the scientific world. Below is a small sample of the awards and honors that Dr. Levine received over the course of his lifetime.

Executive Medical Director, Emeritus: City of Hope
American Diabetes Association's Banting Medal
American Diabetes Association's Charles H. Best Medal
Joslin Medal
Thompson Medal
President of Harvey Society
Member of American Association of Physicians
Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Spirit of Life Award: City of Hope
Lydia and Paul Kalmanovitz Chair in the Biology of Nutrition at City of Hope
Honorary Doctorate of Science degrees: Northwestern and McGill Universities
1964-1965: President of the American Diabetes Association
1967-1970: President and currently Life President of International Diabetes Federation
1980: New York College of Medicine dedicates diabetes center in honor of Dr. Levine
1982: Elected into National Academy of Sciences
1986: W.D. Sansum Award
1995: City of Hope dedicated the Rachmiel Levine, MD, Diabetes Reading Room in its Lee Graff Medical Library

References
R Levine, MS Goldstein, B Huddlestun, SP Klein. Action of insulin on the permeability of cells to free hexoses, as studied by its effect on the distribution of galactose. Am J Physiol 163:70-76, 1950.
R Levine, M Goldstein. On the mechanism of action of insulin. Recent Prog Horm Res 11:343-380, 1955.
R Levine. Insulin action: 1948-80. Diabetes Care 4:38-44, 1981.
 

Rachmiel Levine Symposium

16th Annual Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Diabetes Research Symposium

Date:
March 6 to 9, 2016
 
Location:
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Long Beach, Calif.

Presented by the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope
1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA
 
Made possible by the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope
 

Committee

Committee

Scientific Organizing Committee Members
 
Carla Greenbaum, M.D.
Benaroya Research Institute, Seattle, WA
 
David Harlan, M.D.
University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worcester, MA
 
Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair)
City of Hope, Duarte, CA
 
Olle Korsgren, M.D., Ph.D.
Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden

Rama Natarajan, Ph.D.
City of Hope, Duarte, CA

Bart Roep, M.D., Ph.D.
Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands
 
Ann Marie Schmidt, M.D.
NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY

Andrew Stewart, M.D.
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY

Robert Vigersky, M.D.
Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System, Washington, DC
 
Matthias von Herrath, M.D.
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA

Howard Zisser, M.D.
Insulet Corporation, Santa Barbara, CA
 

Registration

Registration

  Before 01/15/16 Before 02/17/16 Late/Onsite
Physician/Scientist/Industry Professional      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $ $ $
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2016 $ $ $
       
Nurse/Resident/Student/Trainee      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $ $ $
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2016 $ $ $
       
Single Day      
Rachmiel Levine Symposium Only $ $ $
Rachmiel Levine Symposium+ENDO2016 $ $ $
       
       
 
How to Register
Attendees can register for the 16th Annual Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Diabetes Research Symposium online (coming soon) via the City of Hope registration site. 
 
Attendees can also print the registration form (coming soon), complete and mail with payment to: CME Department, ATTN: CME Registration, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA, 91010 (Checks/money orders must be payable to City of Hope-Levine Riggs Symposium.)
 
City of Hope employees may contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org to register directly.
 
Cancellation Policy
Cancellations must be received in writing at levinesymposium@coh.org before February 17, 2016. Cancellations received before February 17 will receive a full refund of the registration minus a $50 administrative fee. Cancellations received on or after February 17 or no-shows will not receive a refund.
 
Special Needs
If you have any special needs you like the Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Symposium to be made aware of, please contact the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
Attendees Traveling to the United States
An official letter of registration to facilitate a visa application can be forwarded to any attendee upon request. The letter will be sent only to the person who has paid the registration fees. However, the invitation implies no obligation of the Rachmiel Levine-Arthur Riggs Symposium to cover accommodation, travel expenses, or other costs related to the meeting. Requests should be directed to the program coordinator at levinesymposium@coh.org.
 
 

Abstracts and Award

Abstracts and Award

 To Be Announced
 
 

Accommodations

Accommodations

 
 
Lodging
A block of non-smoking rooms has been reserved at Hyatt Regency Long Beach.
 
  Single/Double Rate
Standard Room $179.00 + tax
 
Special City of Hope group conference rates per day for rooms, single or double occupancy, are available. The group rate expires on Friday, February 12, 2016, therefore early hotel reservation is suggested.

 
Transportation
View driving directions and transportation services from the Long Beach airport and other surrounding areas.
 

Accreditation

Accreditation

City of Hope is accredited by the Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 
Disclosure
This activity has been planned and implemented in strict compliance with the Essential Elements and Policies of the ACCME. City of Hope takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.
 
Acknowledgement of Commercial Support
This educational conference is made possible, in part, through unrestricted educational grants of support. All grant supporters will be acknowledged at the conference via signage and will be listed in the program and abstract book.
 

Program

Program

To Be Announced
 
 

Rachmiel Levine, M.D.

Dr. Rachmiel Levine

Dr. Rachmiel Levine, known as the "Wise Owl" at City of Hope, was born on August 26, 1910 in Eastern Poland. At the age of six he suffered the loss of his mother and ten years later, his father died in an anti-Jewish riot in the Ukraine. At the age of sixteen, Rachmiel discovered that he had relatives who lived in America and attempted to relocate to the United States. Unable to obtain the visa to come to the United States, Rachmiel immigrated to Canada and was adopted by a Canadian physician. His first career choice was mathematics, but the depression of the 1930s influenced his decision to instead enter the field of medicine.
 
Rachmiel Levine received his undergraduate degree in 1932 and continued his education at McGill University, where he obtained his medical degree with honors in 1936. After medical school, he relocated to work in the field of diabetes research with Dr. Samuel Soskin at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Levine completed his internship and residency training at the Michael Reese Hospital between the years 1936-1938. From the years 1942-1960 he served as Director of the Department of Metabolism, Chairman of the Department of Medicine, and Director of Medical Education at Michael Reese Hospital. Dr. Levine later relocated to New York Medical College where he served as Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1960-1971.
 
In 1971, Dr. Rachmiel Levine became the Executive Medical Director at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California. He served as Director for eight years, and in 1984, the City of Hope honored him with the title, Deputy Director for Research Emeritus.
 
Dr. Levine's research strengths were initially illustrated in his first published paper with Dr. Samuel Soskin entitled, "The Effects of Blood-Sugar Level on Glucose Utilization". With this research study, he introduced the theory that the greater the amount of glucose present in the blood, the greater the amount that is used by the body. In 1946, he published the book entitled, "Carbohydrate Metabolism". The publication of this book helped lay the base for future diabetes studies through its concise basic science summary. In 1949, he gained the title "Father of Modern Diabetes Research" by becoming the first scientist to discover the role of insulin in glucose metabolism. While studying at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Dr. Levine and his colleagues, Dr. Samuel Soskin and Dr. Maurice Goldstein, determined "insulin's mechanical role in glucose metabolism". Contrary to the assumption that glucose molecules freely passed through the cell membrane, Dr. Levine's theory, known as the "Levine Effect" or transport theory, suggested that insulin served as the key regulatory factor for the transport of glucose into the cells. Dr. Levine theorized that insulin stimulates the transport of glucose from blood to fat/muscle cells and thus lowers blood glucose level.
 
Dr. Rachmiel Levine's greatest challenge was to prove his theory to the scientific community. To dispel the ideology that insulin only served in the chemical metabolism of glucose once inside the cell, Dr. Levine performed the following experiment. He injected dogs with galactose and then with galactose plus insulin, and measured the amount of galactose in the blood. Galactose is similar to glucose, in that it can be equally transported across the cell membrane, however once inside the cell, galactose cannot be metabolized like glucose. If successful, the test would show that galactose could only be transported across the cell membrane in the presence of insulin. Dr. Levine's tests proved that galactose collected in the cells and, as a consequence, galactose levels in the blood dropped.
Although Dr. Levine and his colleagues were able to publish their theory, it took them years to thoroughly convince the scientific community. Once accepted, Dr. Levine's theory opened up doors to a new era of hormone research.
 
Dr. Levine's research success continued at the City of Hope National Medical Center as he developed the City of Hope Diabetes Program. In 1978, Dr. Levine encouraged Dr. Arthur D. Riggs and Dr. Keiichi Itakura to genetically engineer E-coli bacteria to produce human insulin (Humulin®). This new preparation of human insulin was the first genetically engineered health care product approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and is now used by over 4 million people worldwide. Dr. Rachmiel Levine retired from City of Hope on November 15, 1991 but continued to contribute to the scientific community until the last weeks of his life. He left behind a legacy of over sixty years of diabetes research and served as mentor and advisor to many. Dr. Levine set an example for all scientists with his concept of a good scientist: "In my opinion a good research scientist needs to have endless curiosity and enormous amounts of patience, since answers in the field of research come slowly and most painfully."

Dr. Levine was married to the late Anne Gussack, a psychiatric social worker and is survived by his daughter, Judith Anne Feldman, MD, a Boston psychiatrist and his son, Daniel Saul Levine, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Rachmiel Levine died in Boston, Massachusetts on February 24, 1998, but will be remembered for his great contributions to the scientific world. Below is a small sample of the awards and honors that Dr. Levine received over the course of his lifetime.

Executive Medical Director, Emeritus: City of Hope
American Diabetes Association's Banting Medal
American Diabetes Association's Charles H. Best Medal
Joslin Medal
Thompson Medal
President of Harvey Society
Member of American Association of Physicians
Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Spirit of Life Award: City of Hope
Lydia and Paul Kalmanovitz Chair in the Biology of Nutrition at City of Hope
Honorary Doctorate of Science degrees: Northwestern and McGill Universities
1964-1965: President of the American Diabetes Association
1967-1970: President and currently Life President of International Diabetes Federation
1980: New York College of Medicine dedicates diabetes center in honor of Dr. Levine
1982: Elected into National Academy of Sciences
1986: W.D. Sansum Award
1995: City of Hope dedicated the Rachmiel Levine, MD, Diabetes Reading Room in its Lee Graff Medical Library

References
R Levine, MS Goldstein, B Huddlestun, SP Klein. Action of insulin on the permeability of cells to free hexoses, as studied by its effect on the distribution of galactose. Am J Physiol 163:70-76, 1950.
R Levine, M Goldstein. On the mechanism of action of insulin. Recent Prog Horm Res 11:343-380, 1955.
R Levine. Insulin action: 1948-80. Diabetes Care 4:38-44, 1981.
 
Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Research
City of Hope’s Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Research, housed in the Leslie & Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Diabetes & Genetic Research Center.  The Department encompasses the laboratory efforts of two Divisions, the Division of Developmental & Translational Diabetes and Endocrine Research Directed by Dr. Fouad Kandeel, and the Division of Molecular Diabetes Research, Directed by Dr. Rama Natarajan.
Contact Us
For conference inquiries:
Karen Ramos
Program Coordinator
Phone: 800-679-4673
 
For exhibit inquiries:
Leonard Chen
Corporate Representative
Phone: 800-679-4673
Email: levinesymposium@coh.org
 
Ranked as one of  "America’s Best Hospitals" in cancer by U.S. News & World Report, City of Hope is a pioneer in the fields of hematopoietic cell transplantation and genetics. Designated as a comprehensive cancer center, the highest honor bestowed by the National Cancer Institute, City of Hope's research and treatment protocols advance care throughout the nation.
 
ICT Mission
The mission of the City of Hope ICT program is to address the problems currently facing islet transplantation and catalyze advancements in the field by sharing the vast and unique resources and expertise available in Southern California.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.


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