A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Radiation Biology Bookmark and Share

Department of Radiation Biology

The Department of Radiation Biology was established to study the fundamental mechanisms of DNA replication and DNA damage repair during cell growth. Efficient DNA damage repair is important for maintaining genome integrity and preventing cancer development in normal cells, but it is also a leading cause for radiation resistance in cancer cells. The department currently has three research groups working under its chair, Binghui Shen, Ph.D to define different aspects of genome maintenance that contribute to tumor etiology and to find a solution for radiation resistance by modulating DNA damage repair pathways in cancer therapy. These groups share a common interest in radiation-induced DNA damage and repair and radiation resistance. The principal investigators and their associates will direct efforts in radiation research toward fulfilling departmental goals, and working in close collaboration with radiation oncologists and other scientists at City of Hope.
 

Binghui Shen, Ph.D. - Enzymology of DNA Replication and Repair and Mouse Models of Cancer
Dr. Shen studies enzymes and mechanisms involved in the replication and repair of DNA damage caused by radiation and other environmental insults employing genetic mouse models of cancer. 


Jeremy Stark, Ph.D. - The Regulation and Fidelity of Chromosomal Break Repair Pathways
The long-term goal of Dr. Stark’s laboratory is to understand the factors and conditions that affect the regulation and fidelity of chromosomal break repair in mammalian cells.

Yilun Liu, Ph.D. - Genome Instability and Human Diseases

Dr. Liu’s long-term agenda is to understand what aspects of genome maintenance and DNA metabolism are required for normal development and cancer prevention.
 
Yanzhong Yang, M.D., Ph.D. - Mechanisms of Gene Regulation and Genome Stability
 
The research in Dr. Yang’s laboratory focuses on studying the molecular mechanisms that regulate gene expression and genome stability, as well as their implications for human diseases.

Radiation Biology

Department of Radiation Biology

The Department of Radiation Biology was established to study the fundamental mechanisms of DNA replication and DNA damage repair during cell growth. Efficient DNA damage repair is important for maintaining genome integrity and preventing cancer development in normal cells, but it is also a leading cause for radiation resistance in cancer cells. The department currently has three research groups working under its chair, Binghui Shen, Ph.D to define different aspects of genome maintenance that contribute to tumor etiology and to find a solution for radiation resistance by modulating DNA damage repair pathways in cancer therapy. These groups share a common interest in radiation-induced DNA damage and repair and radiation resistance. The principal investigators and their associates will direct efforts in radiation research toward fulfilling departmental goals, and working in close collaboration with radiation oncologists and other scientists at City of Hope.
 

Binghui Shen, Ph.D. - Enzymology of DNA Replication and Repair and Mouse Models of Cancer
Dr. Shen studies enzymes and mechanisms involved in the replication and repair of DNA damage caused by radiation and other environmental insults employing genetic mouse models of cancer. 


Jeremy Stark, Ph.D. - The Regulation and Fidelity of Chromosomal Break Repair Pathways
The long-term goal of Dr. Stark’s laboratory is to understand the factors and conditions that affect the regulation and fidelity of chromosomal break repair in mammalian cells.

Yilun Liu, Ph.D. - Genome Instability and Human Diseases

Dr. Liu’s long-term agenda is to understand what aspects of genome maintenance and DNA metabolism are required for normal development and cancer prevention.
 
Yanzhong Yang, M.D., Ph.D. - Mechanisms of Gene Regulation and Genome Stability
 
The research in Dr. Yang’s laboratory focuses on studying the molecular mechanisms that regulate gene expression and genome stability, as well as their implications for human diseases.
Overview
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.
 
 
Research Departments/Divisions

City of Hope is a leader in translational research - integrating basic science, clinical research and patient care.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • The physical side effects of cancer can damage anyone’s self-confidence, but especially that of women who, rightly or wrongly, are more likely to find their appearance (or their own perception of their appearance) directly connected to their ability to face the world with something resembling ap...
  • The promise of stem cell therapy has long been studied in laboratories. Now, as medicine enters an era in which this therapy will be increasingly available to patients, the nurses who help deliver it will be in the spotlight. City of Hope, which has launched its Alpha Clinic for Cell Therapy and Innovation (ACT...
  • Just because you can treat a condition, such as high cholesterol, at the end of life — well, that doesn’t mean you should. That’s the basic lesson of a study to be published March 30 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The ramifications go far beyond that. The research, in which City of Hope’s Betty Fe...
  • The understanding of the relationship between genetics and cancer risk continues to grow, with more genetic testing than ever before available to patients. However, the adage that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is applicable: Without context for what a test result means, and without meaningful guidance...
  • Standard prostate biopsies haven’t changed significantly in the past 30 years – nor have the problems inherent with them. Regular biopsies have an expected error rate: Tumors may potentially be undersampled and, 30 percent of the time, men who undergo a radical prostatectomy are found to have more aggress...
  • In the field of cancer, patients have had surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy as options. Now, as City of Hope officially opens the Alpha Clinic for Cellular Therapy and Innovation, patients battling cancer and other life-threatening diseases have another option: stem-cell-based therapy. The Alpha Clini...
  • How does the environment affect our health? Specifically, how does it affect our risk of cancer? City of Hope physicians and researchers recently answered those questions in an Ask the Experts event in Corona, California, explaining the underlying facts about how the environment can affect our health. Moderator...
  • Nurses and other medical professionals have come to understand that it’s not enough just to fight disease. They also must provide pain relief, symptom control, and an unrelenting commitment to improve patients’ quality of life — especially at the end of life. Not too long ago, this was a relatively ...
  • “Tonight, I’m launching a new precision medicine initiative to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer.” These were the words of President Barack Obama on Jan. 20, 2015, during his State of the Union address. So what is precision medicine, and how close are we to making it a reality for...
  • March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month. How sad, yet how serendipitous, that the co-creator of “The Simpsons” Sam Simon passed away in March after a four-year battle against colon cancer. What message can we all learn from his illness that can help us prevent and overcome colon cancer in our own lives? Colon can...
  • Misagh Karimi, M.D., assistant clinical professor, is a medical oncologist at one of City of Hope’s newest community practice locations, located in Corona in Riverside County. A recent community health report from Corona’s public health department stated that obesity rates for teens and adults in Riverside Coun...
  • In 1975, the median survival for patients with ovarian cancer was about 12 months. Today, the median survival is more than 5 years. Although researchers and clinicians are far from satisfied, the progress in ovarian cancer treatment is encouraging, said Robert Morgan, M.D., F.A.C.P., professor of medical oncolo...
  • Colorectal cancer may be one of the most common cancers in both men and women, but it’s also one of the most curable cancers. Today, because of effective screening tests and more advanced treatment options, there are more than 1 million survivors of colorectal cancer in the United States. Here, colorectal...
  • Breast cancer treatment can damage a woman’s ability to become pregnant, making the impact on fertility one of the key factors that many consider when choosing a therapy regimen. Now a study has found that breast cancer patients treated with a hormone-blocking drug in addition to chemotherapy were less li...
  • My colleagues in the clinic know I’ve got a soft spot. Last week, a patient of mine offered me a fantastic compliment. “You’re looking younger these days, Dr. Pal!” she said, offering me a big hug as she proceeded out of the clinic room. Lovely, I thought. The early morning workouts are paying off. She continue...