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Division of Research Informatics

Ajay Shah, Ph.D.
Director

The Division of Research Informatics (RI) includes systems analysts, application developers/ software engineers, database administrators/architects, EDC/InTelescans group, and decision support services. The staff within RI is specially trained to focus on the information systems requirements unique to the research domain. RI combines the administrative and clinical care data collected during the normal course of patient care with protocol-specific data collected for research purposes and makes it available for use in outcome assessment and analysis.

The Division consists of three functional sections that include Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), Research Informatics Applications (RIA) , and Translational Research Informatics (TRI). It also operates the Cancer Center’s Research Informatics section of the Clinical Protocol & Data Management Core (CPDMC).
 
Research Informatics Applications
 
Srinivas Bolisetty
Director

Research Informatics Applications (RIA) seeks to employ emergent technologies and industry best practices to create integrated products that support the translational continuum. By taking an agile driven methodology, we are able to rapidly move requirements through a continuous integration pipeline - favoring frequent releases to minimize the time it takes for ideas to progress from concept to implementation while maximizing tolerance to change.

Services
 
  • Integrated Research Informatics Platform
  • In-house Applications
  • External Applications
  • Analysis, development, and integration of research support applications
  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Web & Mobile Development
     
Clinical Research Informatics (CRI)

Gabe Peterson
CRI Director

Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) enables the effective and efficient execution of clinical research -- including clinical trials and outcomes research – by applying the science of information management.
 
The key strategic goal of CRI is to build a world-class clinical research informatics infrastructure by implementing best-in-class vendor solutions where available and developing innovative solutions that give City of Hope researchers a competitive advantage. To advance this goal,CRI led the selection and implementation of the best-in-class Electronic Data Capture (EDC) solution for clinical trials with the Medidata EDC, and deployed the Clinical Research Portal business intelligence solution to help clinical researchers translate their data into decisions.

Services
 
  • Clinical Trials Data Capture and Management
  • Observational Research Data Capture and Management
  • Clinical Research Decision Support
 
Research Informatics Architecture
 
Abdul Malik Shakir
Director

Services
  • Research Informatics Platform Architecture
  • Data Architecture
  • Enterprise Data Warehouse
     
Translational Research Informatics Core (TRIC)
 
Mike Chang, Ph.D.
TRI Director

Translational Research Informatics (TRI) strives to empower ground breaking research from basic bench research to clinical research and back. Our goal is to provide contemporary technological solutions to nimbly and specifically support information capture, management and exchange across the Translational Research Space.
 
Our approach is to provide support and service at the individual lab level. Introducing new information technology solutions to help make gathering and visualization of experimental data more facile and at the same time, to optimize and make the process of scientific research more efficient. While our target clients are in the translational research space, we will develop, in time, an information infrastructure partnered with Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) and Bioinformatics that will spark and enable collaborations across basic and clinical research.
 
Services
 
  • Translational Research Experimental Data Capture, Management and Analyses
  • Systems and Process Analyses for Translational Research
  • Workflow/process analyses, optimization and automation.
  • Integrated Inventory & Sample management
 

Research Informatics

Division of Research Informatics

Ajay Shah, Ph.D.
Director

The Division of Research Informatics (RI) includes systems analysts, application developers/ software engineers, database administrators/architects, EDC/InTelescans group, and decision support services. The staff within RI is specially trained to focus on the information systems requirements unique to the research domain. RI combines the administrative and clinical care data collected during the normal course of patient care with protocol-specific data collected for research purposes and makes it available for use in outcome assessment and analysis.

The Division consists of three functional sections that include Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), Research Informatics Applications (RIA) , and Translational Research Informatics (TRI). It also operates the Cancer Center’s Research Informatics section of the Clinical Protocol & Data Management Core (CPDMC).
 
Research Informatics Applications
 
Srinivas Bolisetty
Director

Research Informatics Applications (RIA) seeks to employ emergent technologies and industry best practices to create integrated products that support the translational continuum. By taking an agile driven methodology, we are able to rapidly move requirements through a continuous integration pipeline - favoring frequent releases to minimize the time it takes for ideas to progress from concept to implementation while maximizing tolerance to change.

Services
 
  • Integrated Research Informatics Platform
  • In-house Applications
  • External Applications
  • Analysis, development, and integration of research support applications
  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Web & Mobile Development
     
Clinical Research Informatics (CRI)

Gabe Peterson
CRI Director

Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) enables the effective and efficient execution of clinical research -- including clinical trials and outcomes research – by applying the science of information management.
 
The key strategic goal of CRI is to build a world-class clinical research informatics infrastructure by implementing best-in-class vendor solutions where available and developing innovative solutions that give City of Hope researchers a competitive advantage. To advance this goal,CRI led the selection and implementation of the best-in-class Electronic Data Capture (EDC) solution for clinical trials with the Medidata EDC, and deployed the Clinical Research Portal business intelligence solution to help clinical researchers translate their data into decisions.

Services
 
  • Clinical Trials Data Capture and Management
  • Observational Research Data Capture and Management
  • Clinical Research Decision Support
 
Research Informatics Architecture
 
Abdul Malik Shakir
Director

Services
  • Research Informatics Platform Architecture
  • Data Architecture
  • Enterprise Data Warehouse
     
Translational Research Informatics Core (TRIC)
 
Mike Chang, Ph.D.
TRI Director

Translational Research Informatics (TRI) strives to empower ground breaking research from basic bench research to clinical research and back. Our goal is to provide contemporary technological solutions to nimbly and specifically support information capture, management and exchange across the Translational Research Space.
 
Our approach is to provide support and service at the individual lab level. Introducing new information technology solutions to help make gathering and visualization of experimental data more facile and at the same time, to optimize and make the process of scientific research more efficient. While our target clients are in the translational research space, we will develop, in time, an information infrastructure partnered with Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) and Bioinformatics that will spark and enable collaborations across basic and clinical research.
 
Services
 
  • Translational Research Experimental Data Capture, Management and Analyses
  • Systems and Process Analyses for Translational Research
  • Workflow/process analyses, optimization and automation.
  • Integrated Inventory & Sample management
 
Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Recognized nationwide for its innovative biomedical research, City of Hope's Beckman Research Institute is home to some of the most tenacious and creative minds in science.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
Support Our Research
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