A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Center for Cancer Survivorship

 
Estimated as totaling more than 10 million adults in the U.S. alone, the number of cancer survivors is expected to grow as new advances in cancer screening and treatment diffuse into the community, and with aging of the population. In its recent report, The Institute of Medicine (IOM) noted that many cancer survivors become lost in the transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor. The report recommended recognizing cancer survivorship as a distinct phase of cancer care that deserves ongoing attention from cancer and other healthcare providers. A key component of follow-up care for cancer survivors is development of individualized survivorship care plans that empower survivors with knowledge about their cancer diagnosis and treatment, address the chronic effects of cancer and its therapy (e.g., pain, fatigue, premature menopause, depression/anxiety), provide monitoring recommendations to allow for early identification of treatment-related sequelae (e.g., osteoporosis, heart disease, and second malignancies), and promote health-protective behaviors.

The overall goal of the City of Hope Center for Cancer Survivorship will be to provide specialized long-term follow-up care for cancer survivors, and, in the process, develop a critical resource of research in cancer survivorship. Thus, the Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique, comprehensive follow-up care for cancer survivors in a clinical research setting.

The Center will support the following activities:
 
  • Clinical Care: Comprehensive long-term follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, survivors of prostate cancer and other adult malignancies, and hematopoietic cell transplant survivors. Care will be provided as a consultative service in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider and oncologist in order to ensure that the unique medical needs of cancer survivors are addressed. All patients will be offered the opportunity to participate in ongoing research studies through the Center.
  • Healthcare Professional Training: The Center will offer a structured training program in Cancer Survivorship for clinicians (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) and researchers (physicians, nurses, epidemiologists and others) planning careers in the cancer survivorship field.
  • Patient/Family/Community/Education: Health education personalized for each survivor based on his or her diagnosis, treatment and current medical condition will be provided during follow-up visits at the Center. In addition, the Center will host periodic educational seminars for survivors and their families, as well as educational outreach programs for the community.
  • Research: The Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique opportunities for collaborative clinical research across populations of survivors. Although research in childhood cancer survivors has provided much insight into the health-related outcomes after cancer, very little information is available regarding the health and well being of survivors of adult cancer. Multidisciplinary clinics for all cancer survivors, using a standardized follow-up protocol will help establish an invaluable resource (with the establishment of an extensive database) that will further the knowledge in cancer survivorship
 
The primary objective of the Center for Cancer Survivorship is to provide care to cancer survivors across the entire age spectrum and treated with all modalities (conventional chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hematopoietic cell transplantation) to facilitate evaluation of health outcomes in this previously understudied patient population. This will help enhance our understanding of the chronic health conditions faced by this population and will provide assistance in tailoring the follow-up needs of those at risk of these complications. The ultimate goal of this Center is to improve the overall quality of life for the survivors.

The Cancer Center has committed resources for the development of the necessary infrastructure to establish multidisciplinary survivorship clinics and the development of clinical research protocols for collecting the necessary data.
 

Survivorship

Life after cancer treatment can sometimes present both physical and emotional challenges.That’s why City of Hope developed the Center for Cancer Survivorship – a long-term follow-up program designed to create a bridge between cancer treatment and community medical care.
 
The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides specialized follow-up care and patient education in a clinical research setting. By participating in research, our patients help us to learn more about issues facing cancer survivors, resulting in opportunities to continually improve survivorship care and to share what is learned with the medical community at large.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship

 
The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program at City of Hope provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed treatment for a cancer that was diagnosed before they were 22 years old. Patients who participate in this program are seen every year in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of childhood cancer survivors. Patients are evaluated by a team of healthcare professionals who have expertise in survivorship issues, including a physician or nurse practitioner, a dietitian, and a psychologist or social worker. Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible health problems that can sometimes occur after cancer treatment. They will also have the opportunity to talk with the Survivorship Program team about the treatment that they received for cancer, its potential impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. Each patient will receive a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment. They will also receive guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information about available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary healthcare and treatment team and is part of the research program here at City of Hope.   
Eligibility Criteria for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program
 
Participants in this program will meet the following criteria:
  • Diagnosis of cancer at age 21 or younger
  • At least five years since cancer diagnosis
  • Currently in remission
  • At least two years since completion of all cancer therapy
     
Highlights of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • A personalized record of cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Yearly evaluation by a team of professionals specializing in cancer survivorship. The team includes a physician, nurse practitioner, dietitian, psychologist and social worker.
  • Information about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, and for additional resources and services, if needed
  • Communication with primary healthcare provider and treatment team
 

Why do childhood cancer survivors need specialized follow-up care?

Within the last 30 years, significant progress has been made in the treatment for childhood cancer, and more and more young people are becoming cancer survivors. Sometimes, as these young people grow up, they develop complications related to their cancer treatment. Some people have no complications, but others may develop one or more problems related to their cancer treatment.
 
Complications can include problems with growth, learning, hearing, vision, the heart, lungs, thyroid gland, reproductive system, digestive tract, kidneys, bones and joints, and second cancers. Many of these complications may not become apparent for years after the treatment. In some cases, preventive measures can be taken to reduce the chances that a complication will occur.
 
Therefore, continued medical evaluation and follow-up by a team of healthcare professionals knowledgeable about long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment is expected to be an important addition to routine healthcare for all childhood cancer survivors.

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a physician or nurse practitioner who has expertise in childhood cancer and survivorship issues. These professionals work in collaboration with your treatment team and will also communicate with your primary healthcare provider, at your request, if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to specialists or services if needed, based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every year. Your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed with you by the physician or nurse practitioner. You will undergo a physical examination and have screening tests based on the treatment that you received. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on this evaluation.
 
The Survivorship Program team members will talk with you about your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will also receive a written record of your cancer treatment and follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems.
 
A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. Questions include topics such as your current health status, quality of life, emotional concerns, and cancer treatment. Additional topics include family history, general health, health habits (such as exercise) and general demographic information (such as race and education). Your answers will not only help researchers, they will be used by the Survivorship Program team to assist in determining your ongoing health needs.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide on the questionnaires, and the results of your evaluation (such as results of blood tests or physical exam findings), will be recorded in a research database. The database is password-protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study.
 
Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.
 
The goals of this research are to identify complications of childhood cancer therapy, to develop treatments or preventive measures for these complications, and to develop interventions aimed at improving the quality of life in childhood cancer survivors.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have his or her own primary healthcare provider, such as a pediatrician, family physician, internist, nurse practitioner or physician assistant, who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

How do I get more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at (626) 471-9220 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

We Invite You to Attend City of Hope's Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic.
 
This program provides once-a-year, long-term follow-up care for childhood cancer survivors in a clinical research setting

This clinic is for people who: 
 
  • Were diagnosed with cancer or a similar illness at age 21 years or younger
  • Are in remission
  • Finished treatment at least two years ago
     
During the yearly clinic visit you will see several health-care providers including:
 
  • Physician or nurse practitioner
  • Dietitian
  • Psychosocial team member
     
You will also: 
 
  • Have a health evaluation
  • Receive tips about how to stay healthy
  • Get a summary of your cancer treatment
  • Get a personalized plan for your ongoing survivorship care

At your request, a copy of your clinic visit record can be sent to all of your health-care providers.

To schedule an appointment, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9220.
 

Prostate Cancer Survivorship

 
The Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Patients who participate in this program are seen every 6 to 12 months in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of prostate cancer survivors. Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues.  Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible recurrence of their cancer and will have the opportunity to discuss their cancer treatment, its impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible.  Each patient will receive a Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment, with guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information regarding available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary treatment team and is part of the research program at City of Hope.
 
Highlights of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • The Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of your cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Follow-up assessments for cancer recurrence
  • Evaluation for any long-term complications of treatment
  • Education about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • Screening recommendations for other cancers (such as colon cancer), according to national guidelines
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, resources, or services as needed
  • Communication with your primary healthcare provider and treatment team

Who is eligible for this program?

The following criteria must be met to be eligible for the program: -- A history of localized prostate cancer diagnosed at age 22 or older -- At least one year since diagnosis -- Received surgical treatment at City of Hope -- No current evidence of prostate cancer, or if present, the prostate cancer is in a state of stable disease -- No history of prostate cancer recurrence, progression, or metastasis (spread outside the area of the prostate gland)

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues, who works in collaboration with your primary treatment team and will communicate with your physician if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to the social worker, dietitian, psychologist, physical therapist, or other specialists or services as needed based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every 6 months for the first five years after diagnosis, and then yearly thereafter. During each visit, your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed and you will undergo a physical examination and have a PSA blood test. Digital rectal examinations will be done yearly. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on the results of your health history and physical examination. You will have the opportunity to discuss your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will receive a Survivorship Care Plan that includes a written record of your cancer treatment with follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems. A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. These questionnaires include assessment of symptoms that some men may experience as a result of prostate cancer treatment (such as problems with urinary, bowel, or sexual function). Additional questions are asked about your health status, family history, general health, health habits (such as smoking), and general demographic information (such as race and employment). In addition to using this information in research, your answers to many of these questions will be used by the healthcare provider to assist in determining your general state of health.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide in the questionnaires, and the results of your clinic visit (such as PSA level and physical exam findings) will be recorded in a research database. The database is password protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study. Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have their own primary healthcare provider (internist, family physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant) who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

Is there a charge for participating in this program?

Costs for the clinic visits, PSA lab tests, and any recommended referrals or additional tests that are medically indicated based on your health evaluation are considered standard medical care and will be billed to you or your insurance company according to the usual and customary charges. There are no costs associated with the research questionnaires related to this study.

How do I find out more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9221 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Center for Cancer Survivorship

Center for Cancer Survivorship

 
Estimated as totaling more than 10 million adults in the U.S. alone, the number of cancer survivors is expected to grow as new advances in cancer screening and treatment diffuse into the community, and with aging of the population. In its recent report, The Institute of Medicine (IOM) noted that many cancer survivors become lost in the transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor. The report recommended recognizing cancer survivorship as a distinct phase of cancer care that deserves ongoing attention from cancer and other healthcare providers. A key component of follow-up care for cancer survivors is development of individualized survivorship care plans that empower survivors with knowledge about their cancer diagnosis and treatment, address the chronic effects of cancer and its therapy (e.g., pain, fatigue, premature menopause, depression/anxiety), provide monitoring recommendations to allow for early identification of treatment-related sequelae (e.g., osteoporosis, heart disease, and second malignancies), and promote health-protective behaviors.

The overall goal of the City of Hope Center for Cancer Survivorship will be to provide specialized long-term follow-up care for cancer survivors, and, in the process, develop a critical resource of research in cancer survivorship. Thus, the Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique, comprehensive follow-up care for cancer survivors in a clinical research setting.

The Center will support the following activities:
 
  • Clinical Care: Comprehensive long-term follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, survivors of prostate cancer and other adult malignancies, and hematopoietic cell transplant survivors. Care will be provided as a consultative service in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider and oncologist in order to ensure that the unique medical needs of cancer survivors are addressed. All patients will be offered the opportunity to participate in ongoing research studies through the Center.
  • Healthcare Professional Training: The Center will offer a structured training program in Cancer Survivorship for clinicians (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) and researchers (physicians, nurses, epidemiologists and others) planning careers in the cancer survivorship field.
  • Patient/Family/Community/Education: Health education personalized for each survivor based on his or her diagnosis, treatment and current medical condition will be provided during follow-up visits at the Center. In addition, the Center will host periodic educational seminars for survivors and their families, as well as educational outreach programs for the community.
  • Research: The Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique opportunities for collaborative clinical research across populations of survivors. Although research in childhood cancer survivors has provided much insight into the health-related outcomes after cancer, very little information is available regarding the health and well being of survivors of adult cancer. Multidisciplinary clinics for all cancer survivors, using a standardized follow-up protocol will help establish an invaluable resource (with the establishment of an extensive database) that will further the knowledge in cancer survivorship
 
The primary objective of the Center for Cancer Survivorship is to provide care to cancer survivors across the entire age spectrum and treated with all modalities (conventional chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hematopoietic cell transplantation) to facilitate evaluation of health outcomes in this previously understudied patient population. This will help enhance our understanding of the chronic health conditions faced by this population and will provide assistance in tailoring the follow-up needs of those at risk of these complications. The ultimate goal of this Center is to improve the overall quality of life for the survivors.

The Cancer Center has committed resources for the development of the necessary infrastructure to establish multidisciplinary survivorship clinics and the development of clinical research protocols for collecting the necessary data.
 

Survivorship

Survivorship

Life after cancer treatment can sometimes present both physical and emotional challenges.That’s why City of Hope developed the Center for Cancer Survivorship – a long-term follow-up program designed to create a bridge between cancer treatment and community medical care.
 
The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides specialized follow-up care and patient education in a clinical research setting. By participating in research, our patients help us to learn more about issues facing cancer survivors, resulting in opportunities to continually improve survivorship care and to share what is learned with the medical community at large.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program

Childhood Cancer Survivorship

 
The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program at City of Hope provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed treatment for a cancer that was diagnosed before they were 22 years old. Patients who participate in this program are seen every year in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of childhood cancer survivors. Patients are evaluated by a team of healthcare professionals who have expertise in survivorship issues, including a physician or nurse practitioner, a dietitian, and a psychologist or social worker. Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible health problems that can sometimes occur after cancer treatment. They will also have the opportunity to talk with the Survivorship Program team about the treatment that they received for cancer, its potential impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. Each patient will receive a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment. They will also receive guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information about available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary healthcare and treatment team and is part of the research program here at City of Hope.   
Eligibility Criteria for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program
 
Participants in this program will meet the following criteria:
  • Diagnosis of cancer at age 21 or younger
  • At least five years since cancer diagnosis
  • Currently in remission
  • At least two years since completion of all cancer therapy
     
Highlights of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • A personalized record of cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Yearly evaluation by a team of professionals specializing in cancer survivorship. The team includes a physician, nurse practitioner, dietitian, psychologist and social worker.
  • Information about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, and for additional resources and services, if needed
  • Communication with primary healthcare provider and treatment team
 

Why do childhood cancer survivors need specialized follow-up care?

Within the last 30 years, significant progress has been made in the treatment for childhood cancer, and more and more young people are becoming cancer survivors. Sometimes, as these young people grow up, they develop complications related to their cancer treatment. Some people have no complications, but others may develop one or more problems related to their cancer treatment.
 
Complications can include problems with growth, learning, hearing, vision, the heart, lungs, thyroid gland, reproductive system, digestive tract, kidneys, bones and joints, and second cancers. Many of these complications may not become apparent for years after the treatment. In some cases, preventive measures can be taken to reduce the chances that a complication will occur.
 
Therefore, continued medical evaluation and follow-up by a team of healthcare professionals knowledgeable about long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment is expected to be an important addition to routine healthcare for all childhood cancer survivors.

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a physician or nurse practitioner who has expertise in childhood cancer and survivorship issues. These professionals work in collaboration with your treatment team and will also communicate with your primary healthcare provider, at your request, if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to specialists or services if needed, based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every year. Your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed with you by the physician or nurse practitioner. You will undergo a physical examination and have screening tests based on the treatment that you received. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on this evaluation.
 
The Survivorship Program team members will talk with you about your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will also receive a written record of your cancer treatment and follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems.
 
A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. Questions include topics such as your current health status, quality of life, emotional concerns, and cancer treatment. Additional topics include family history, general health, health habits (such as exercise) and general demographic information (such as race and education). Your answers will not only help researchers, they will be used by the Survivorship Program team to assist in determining your ongoing health needs.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide on the questionnaires, and the results of your evaluation (such as results of blood tests or physical exam findings), will be recorded in a research database. The database is password-protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study.
 
Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.
 
The goals of this research are to identify complications of childhood cancer therapy, to develop treatments or preventive measures for these complications, and to develop interventions aimed at improving the quality of life in childhood cancer survivors.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have his or her own primary healthcare provider, such as a pediatrician, family physician, internist, nurse practitioner or physician assistant, who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

How do I get more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at (626) 471-9220 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

We Invite You to Attend City of Hope's Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic.
 
This program provides once-a-year, long-term follow-up care for childhood cancer survivors in a clinical research setting

This clinic is for people who: 
 
  • Were diagnosed with cancer or a similar illness at age 21 years or younger
  • Are in remission
  • Finished treatment at least two years ago
     
During the yearly clinic visit you will see several health-care providers including:
 
  • Physician or nurse practitioner
  • Dietitian
  • Psychosocial team member
     
You will also: 
 
  • Have a health evaluation
  • Receive tips about how to stay healthy
  • Get a summary of your cancer treatment
  • Get a personalized plan for your ongoing survivorship care

At your request, a copy of your clinic visit record can be sent to all of your health-care providers.

To schedule an appointment, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9220.
 

Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program

Prostate Cancer Survivorship

 
The Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Patients who participate in this program are seen every 6 to 12 months in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of prostate cancer survivors. Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues.  Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible recurrence of their cancer and will have the opportunity to discuss their cancer treatment, its impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible.  Each patient will receive a Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment, with guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information regarding available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary treatment team and is part of the research program at City of Hope.
 
Highlights of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • The Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of your cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Follow-up assessments for cancer recurrence
  • Evaluation for any long-term complications of treatment
  • Education about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • Screening recommendations for other cancers (such as colon cancer), according to national guidelines
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, resources, or services as needed
  • Communication with your primary healthcare provider and treatment team

Who is eligible for this program?

The following criteria must be met to be eligible for the program: -- A history of localized prostate cancer diagnosed at age 22 or older -- At least one year since diagnosis -- Received surgical treatment at City of Hope -- No current evidence of prostate cancer, or if present, the prostate cancer is in a state of stable disease -- No history of prostate cancer recurrence, progression, or metastasis (spread outside the area of the prostate gland)

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues, who works in collaboration with your primary treatment team and will communicate with your physician if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to the social worker, dietitian, psychologist, physical therapist, or other specialists or services as needed based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every 6 months for the first five years after diagnosis, and then yearly thereafter. During each visit, your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed and you will undergo a physical examination and have a PSA blood test. Digital rectal examinations will be done yearly. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on the results of your health history and physical examination. You will have the opportunity to discuss your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will receive a Survivorship Care Plan that includes a written record of your cancer treatment with follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems. A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. These questionnaires include assessment of symptoms that some men may experience as a result of prostate cancer treatment (such as problems with urinary, bowel, or sexual function). Additional questions are asked about your health status, family history, general health, health habits (such as smoking), and general demographic information (such as race and employment). In addition to using this information in research, your answers to many of these questions will be used by the healthcare provider to assist in determining your general state of health.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide in the questionnaires, and the results of your clinic visit (such as PSA level and physical exam findings) will be recorded in a research database. The database is password protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study. Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have their own primary healthcare provider (internist, family physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant) who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

Is there a charge for participating in this program?

Costs for the clinic visits, PSA lab tests, and any recommended referrals or additional tests that are medically indicated based on your health evaluation are considered standard medical care and will be billed to you or your insurance company according to the usual and customary charges. There are no costs associated with the research questionnaires related to this study.

How do I find out more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9221 or email: survivorship@coh.org.
Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Brochure

The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program is a special program for patients who have completed treatment for cancer.
 
Programa de Supervivencia del Cáncer Infantil

 


El Programa de Supervivencia del Cáncer
Infantil es un programa especial para los
pacientes que hayan finalizado su tratamiento
para el cáncer.

 

Información en español


Para más información o para programar una cita, llame al 626-471-9220 o envíe un correo electrónico a survivorship@coh.org.

Population Sciences
The mission of the Department of Population Sciences is to advance the science and application of cancer etiology, prevention and outcomes, and reduce the burden of cancer and its sequelae across all populations, through collaborative multidisciplinary programs in clinical service, research and education.
 
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Equipping the immune system to fight cancer – a disease that thrives on mutations and circumventing the body’s natural defenses – is within reach. In fact, City of Hope researchers are testing one approach in clinical trials now. Scientists take a number of steps to turn cancer patients’ T cells – white b...
  • As treatments for lung cancer become more targeted and effective, the need for better technology to detect lung cancer mutations becomes increasingly important. A new clinical study at City of Hope is examining the feasibility of using blood and urine tests to detect lung cancer mutations, potentially allowing ...
  • When it comes to breast cancer risk, insulin levels may matter more than weight, new research has found. The study from Imperial College London School of Public Health, published in the journal Cancer Research, indicates that metabolic health – not a person’s weight or body mass index – increases breast cancer ...
  • No one ever plans to have cancer – and there’s never a good time. For Homa Sadat, her cancer came at a particularly bad time: just one year after losing her father to the pancreatic cancer he had battled for two years. She was working a grueling schedule managing three commercial office buildings. She’d just [&...
  • Patients at City of Hope – most of whom are fighting cancer – rely on more than 37,000 units of blood and platelets each year for their treatment and survival. Every one of those units comes from family, friends or someone who traded an hour or so of their time and a pint of their […]
  • Surgery is vital in the treatment of cancer – it’s used to help diagnose, treat and even prevent the disease – so a new colorectal cancer study linking a decrease in surgeries for advanced cancer to increased survival rates may raise more questions than it answers for some patients. The surgery-and-surviv...
  • Age is the single greatest risk factor overall for cancer; our chances of developing the disease rise steeply after age 50. For geriatric oncology nurse Peggy Burhenn, the meaning is clear: Cancer is primarily a geriatric condition. That’s why she is forging inroads in the care of older adults with cancer. Burh...
  • One of American’s great sportscasters, Stuart Scott, passed away from recurrent cancer of the appendix at the young age of 49. His cancer was diagnosed when he was only 40 years old. It was found during an operation for appendicitis. His courageous fight against this disease began in 2007, resumed again with an...
  • When Homa Sadat found a lump in her breast at age 27, her gynecologist told her what many doctors say to young women: You’re too young to have breast cancer. With the lump dismissed as a harmless cyst, she didn’t think about it again until she was at a restaurant six months later and felt […]
  • What most people call a “bone marrow transplant” is not actually a transplant of bone marrow; it is instead the transplantation of what’s known as hematopoietic stem cells. Such cells are often taken from bone marrow, but not always. Hematopoietic stem cells are simply immature cells that can ...
  • Doctors have long known that women with a precancerous condition called atypical hyperplasia have an elevated risk of breast cancer. Now a new study has found that the risk is more serious than previously thought. Hyperplasia itself is an overgrowth of cells; atypical hyperplasia is an overgrowth in a distorted...
  • Don’t kid yourself. Just because it’s mid-January doesn’t mean it’s too late to make resolutions for a happier, and healthier, 2015. Just consider them resolutions that are more mature than those giddy, sometimes self-deluded, Jan. 1 resolutions. To that end, we share some advice from Cary A. Presant, M.D., an ...
  • Sales and marketing executive Jim Murphy first came to City of Hope in 2002 to donate blood for a friend who was being treated for esophageal cancer. The disease is serious. Although esophageal cancer accounts for only about 1 percent of cancer diagnoses in the U.S., only about 20 percent of patients survive at...
  • Aaron Bomar and his family were celebrating his daughter’s 33rd birthday in September 2014 when he received alarming news: According to an X-ray taken earlier that day at an urgent care facility, he had a node on his aorta and was in danger of an aneurysm. Bomar held hands with his wife and daughter and s...
  • Explaining a prostate cancer diagnosis to a young child can be difficult — especially when the cancer is incurable. But conveying the need for prostate cancer research, as it turns out, is easily done. And that leads to action. Earlier this year, Gerald Rustad, 71, who is living with a very aggressive form of m...