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Center for Cancer Survivorship

Estimated as totaling more than 10 million adults in the U.S. alone, the number of cancer survivors is expected to grow as new advances in cancer screening and treatment diffuse into the community, and with aging of the population. In its recent report, The Institute of Medicine (IOM) noted that many cancer survivors become lost in the transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor. The report recommended recognizing cancer survivorship as a distinct phase of cancer care that deserves ongoing attention from cancer and other healthcare providers. A key component of follow-up care for cancer survivors is development of individualized survivorship care plans that empower survivors with knowledge about their cancer diagnosis and treatment, address the chronic effects of cancer and its therapy (e.g., pain, fatigue, premature menopause, depression/anxiety), provide monitoring recommendations to allow for early identification of treatment-related sequelae (e.g., osteoporosis, heart disease, and second malignancies), and promote health-protective behaviors.

The overall goal of the City of Hope Center for Cancer Survivorship will be to provide specialized long-term follow-up care for cancer survivors, and, in the process, develop a critical resource of research in cancer survivorship. Thus, the Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique, comprehensive follow-up care for cancer survivors in a clinical research setting.

The Center will support the following activities:
 
  • Clinical Care: Comprehensive long-term follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, survivors of prostate cancer and other adult malignancies, and hematopoietic cell transplant survivors. Care will be provided as a consultative service in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider and oncologist in order to ensure that the unique medical needs of cancer survivors are addressed. All patients will be offered the opportunity to participate in ongoing research studies through the Center.
  • Healthcare Professional Training: The Center will offer a structured training program in Cancer Survivorship for clinicians (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) and researchers (physicians, nurses, epidemiologists and others) planning careers in the cancer survivorship field.
  • Patient/Family/Community/Education: Health education personalized for each survivor based on his or her diagnosis, treatment and current medical condition will be provided during follow-up visits at the Center. In addition, the Center will host periodic educational seminars for survivors and their families, as well as educational outreach programs for the community.
  • Research: The Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique opportunities for collaborative clinical research across populations of survivors. Although research in childhood cancer survivors has provided much insight into the health-related outcomes after cancer, very little information is available regarding the health and well being of survivors of adult cancer. Multidisciplinary clinics for all cancer survivors, using a standardized follow-up protocol will help establish an invaluable resource (with the establishment of an extensive database) that will further the knowledge in cancer survivorship
 
The primary objective of the Center for Cancer Survivorship is to provide care to cancer survivors across the entire age spectrum and treated with all modalities (conventional chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hematopoietic cell transplantation) to facilitate evaluation of health outcomes in this previously understudied patient population. This will help enhance our understanding of the chronic health conditions faced by this population and will provide assistance in tailoring the follow-up needs of those at risk of these complications. The ultimate goal of this Center is to improve the overall quality of life for the survivors.

The Cancer Center has committed resources for the development of the necessary infrastructure to establish multidisciplinary survivorship clinics and the development of clinical research protocols for collecting the necessary data.
 

Survivorship

Life after cancer treatment can sometimes present both physical and emotional challenges.That’s why City of Hope developed the Center for Cancer Survivorship – a long-term follow-up program designed to create a bridge between cancer treatment and community medical care.
 
The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides specialized follow-up care and patient education in a clinical research setting. By participating in research, our patients help us to learn more about issues facing cancer survivors, resulting in opportunities to continually improve survivorship care and to share what is learned with the medical community at large.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship

 
The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program at City of Hope provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed treatment for a cancer that was diagnosed before they were 22 years old. Patients who participate in this program are seen every year in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of childhood cancer survivors. Patients are evaluated by a team of healthcare professionals who have expertise in survivorship issues, including a physician or nurse practitioner, a dietitian, and a psychologist or social worker. Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible health problems that can sometimes occur after cancer treatment. They will also have the opportunity to talk with the Survivorship Program team about the treatment that they received for cancer, its potential impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. Each patient will receive a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment. They will also receive guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information about available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary healthcare and treatment team and is part of the research program here at City of Hope.   

 
Participants in this program will meet the following criteria:
  • Diagnosis of cancer at age 21 or younger
  • At least five years since cancer diagnosis
  • Currently in remission
  • At least two years since completion of all cancer therapy
     
Highlights of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • A personalized record of cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Yearly evaluation by a team of professionals specializing in cancer survivorship. The team includes a physician, nurse practitioner, dietitian, psychologist and social worker.
  • Information about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, and for additional resources and services, if needed
  • Communication with primary healthcare provider and treatment team
 

Why do childhood cancer survivors need specialized follow-up care?

Within the last 30 years, significant progress has been made in the treatment for childhood cancer, and more and more young people are becoming cancer survivors. Sometimes, as these young people grow up, they develop complications related to their cancer treatment. Some people have no complications, but others may develop one or more problems related to their cancer treatment.
 
Complications can include problems with growth, learning, hearing, vision, the heart, lungs, thyroid gland, reproductive system, digestive tract, kidneys, bones and joints, and second cancers. Many of these complications may not become apparent for years after the treatment. In some cases, preventive measures can be taken to reduce the chances that a complication will occur.
 
Therefore, continued medical evaluation and follow-up by a team of healthcare professionals knowledgeable about long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment is expected to be an important addition to routine healthcare for all childhood cancer survivors.

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a physician or nurse practitioner who has expertise in childhood cancer and survivorship issues. These professionals work in collaboration with your treatment team and will also communicate with your primary healthcare provider, at your request, if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to specialists or services if needed, based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every year. Your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed with you by the physician or nurse practitioner. You will undergo a physical examination and have screening tests based on the treatment that you received. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on this evaluation.
 
The Survivorship Program team members will talk with you about your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will also receive a written record of your cancer treatment and follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems.
 
A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. Questions include topics such as your current health status, quality of life, emotional concerns, and cancer treatment. Additional topics include family history, general health, health habits (such as exercise) and general demographic information (such as race and education). Your answers will not only help researchers, they will be used by the Survivorship Program team to assist in determining your ongoing health needs.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide on the questionnaires, and the results of your evaluation (such as results of blood tests or physical exam findings), will be recorded in a research database. The database is password-protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study.
 
Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.
 
The goals of this research are to identify complications of childhood cancer therapy, to develop treatments or preventive measures for these complications, and to develop interventions aimed at improving the quality of life in childhood cancer survivors.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have his or her own primary healthcare provider, such as a pediatrician, family physician, internist, nurse practitioner or physician assistant, who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

How do I get more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at (626) 471-9220 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

We Invite You to Attend City of Hope's Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic.
 
This program provides once-a-year, long-term follow-up care for childhood cancer survivors in a clinical research setting

This clinic is for people who: 
 
  • Were diagnosed with cancer or a similar illness at age 21 years or younger
  • Are in remission
  • Finished treatment at least two years ago
     
During the yearly clinic visit you will see several health-care providers including:
 
  • Physician or nurse practitioner
  • Dietitian
  • Psychosocial team member
     
You will also: 
 
  • Have a health evaluation
  • Receive tips about how to stay healthy
  • Get a summary of your cancer treatment
  • Get a personalized plan for your ongoing survivorship care

At your request, a copy of your clinic visit record can be sent to all of your health-care providers.

To schedule an appointment, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9220.
 

Prostate Cancer Survivorship

 
The Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Patients who participate in this program are seen every 6 to 12 months in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of prostate cancer survivors. Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues.  Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible recurrence of their cancer and will have the opportunity to discuss their cancer treatment, its impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible.  Each patient will receive a Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment, with guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information regarding available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary treatment team and is part of the research program at City of Hope.
 
Highlights of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • The Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of your cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Follow-up assessments for cancer recurrence
  • Evaluation for any long-term complications of treatment
  • Education about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • Screening recommendations for other cancers (such as colon cancer), according to national guidelines
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, resources, or services as needed
  • Communication with your primary healthcare provider and treatment team


Who is eligible for this program?

The following criteria must be met to be eligible for the program: -- A history of localized prostate cancer diagnosed at age 22 or older -- At least one year since diagnosis -- Received surgical treatment at City of Hope -- No current evidence of prostate cancer, or if present, the prostate cancer is in a state of stable disease -- No history of prostate cancer recurrence, progression, or metastasis (spread outside the area of the prostate gland)

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues, who works in collaboration with your primary treatment team and will communicate with your physician if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to the social worker, dietitian, psychologist, physical therapist, or other specialists or services as needed based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every 6 months for the first five years after diagnosis, and then yearly thereafter. During each visit, your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed and you will undergo a physical examination and have a PSA blood test. Digital rectal examinations will be done yearly. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on the results of your health history and physical examination. You will have the opportunity to discuss your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will receive a Survivorship Care Plan that includes a written record of your cancer treatment with follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems. A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. These questionnaires include assessment of symptoms that some men may experience as a result of prostate cancer treatment (such as problems with urinary, bowel, or sexual function). Additional questions are asked about your health status, family history, general health, health habits (such as smoking), and general demographic information (such as race and employment). In addition to using this information in research, your answers to many of these questions will be used by the healthcare provider to assist in determining your general state of health.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide in the questionnaires, and the results of your clinic visit (such as PSA level and physical exam findings) will be recorded in a research database. The database is password protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study. Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have their own primary healthcare provider (internist, family physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant) who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

Is there a charge for participating in this program?

Costs for the clinic visits, PSA lab tests, and any recommended referrals or additional tests that are medically indicated based on your health evaluation are considered standard medical care and will be billed to you or your insurance company according to the usual and customary charges. There are no costs associated with the research questionnaires related to this study.

How do I find out more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9221 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Center for Cancer Survivorship

Center for Cancer Survivorship

Estimated as totaling more than 10 million adults in the U.S. alone, the number of cancer survivors is expected to grow as new advances in cancer screening and treatment diffuse into the community, and with aging of the population. In its recent report, The Institute of Medicine (IOM) noted that many cancer survivors become lost in the transition from cancer patient to cancer survivor. The report recommended recognizing cancer survivorship as a distinct phase of cancer care that deserves ongoing attention from cancer and other healthcare providers. A key component of follow-up care for cancer survivors is development of individualized survivorship care plans that empower survivors with knowledge about their cancer diagnosis and treatment, address the chronic effects of cancer and its therapy (e.g., pain, fatigue, premature menopause, depression/anxiety), provide monitoring recommendations to allow for early identification of treatment-related sequelae (e.g., osteoporosis, heart disease, and second malignancies), and promote health-protective behaviors.

The overall goal of the City of Hope Center for Cancer Survivorship will be to provide specialized long-term follow-up care for cancer survivors, and, in the process, develop a critical resource of research in cancer survivorship. Thus, the Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique, comprehensive follow-up care for cancer survivors in a clinical research setting.

The Center will support the following activities:
 
  • Clinical Care: Comprehensive long-term follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, survivors of prostate cancer and other adult malignancies, and hematopoietic cell transplant survivors. Care will be provided as a consultative service in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider and oncologist in order to ensure that the unique medical needs of cancer survivors are addressed. All patients will be offered the opportunity to participate in ongoing research studies through the Center.
  • Healthcare Professional Training: The Center will offer a structured training program in Cancer Survivorship for clinicians (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) and researchers (physicians, nurses, epidemiologists and others) planning careers in the cancer survivorship field.
  • Patient/Family/Community/Education: Health education personalized for each survivor based on his or her diagnosis, treatment and current medical condition will be provided during follow-up visits at the Center. In addition, the Center will host periodic educational seminars for survivors and their families, as well as educational outreach programs for the community.
  • Research: The Center for Cancer Survivorship will provide unique opportunities for collaborative clinical research across populations of survivors. Although research in childhood cancer survivors has provided much insight into the health-related outcomes after cancer, very little information is available regarding the health and well being of survivors of adult cancer. Multidisciplinary clinics for all cancer survivors, using a standardized follow-up protocol will help establish an invaluable resource (with the establishment of an extensive database) that will further the knowledge in cancer survivorship
 
The primary objective of the Center for Cancer Survivorship is to provide care to cancer survivors across the entire age spectrum and treated with all modalities (conventional chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hematopoietic cell transplantation) to facilitate evaluation of health outcomes in this previously understudied patient population. This will help enhance our understanding of the chronic health conditions faced by this population and will provide assistance in tailoring the follow-up needs of those at risk of these complications. The ultimate goal of this Center is to improve the overall quality of life for the survivors.

The Cancer Center has committed resources for the development of the necessary infrastructure to establish multidisciplinary survivorship clinics and the development of clinical research protocols for collecting the necessary data.
 

Survivorship

Survivorship

Life after cancer treatment can sometimes present both physical and emotional challenges.That’s why City of Hope developed the Center for Cancer Survivorship – a long-term follow-up program designed to create a bridge between cancer treatment and community medical care.
 
The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides specialized follow-up care and patient education in a clinical research setting. By participating in research, our patients help us to learn more about issues facing cancer survivors, resulting in opportunities to continually improve survivorship care and to share what is learned with the medical community at large.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program

Childhood Cancer Survivorship

 
The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program at City of Hope provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed treatment for a cancer that was diagnosed before they were 22 years old. Patients who participate in this program are seen every year in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of childhood cancer survivors. Patients are evaluated by a team of healthcare professionals who have expertise in survivorship issues, including a physician or nurse practitioner, a dietitian, and a psychologist or social worker. Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible health problems that can sometimes occur after cancer treatment. They will also have the opportunity to talk with the Survivorship Program team about the treatment that they received for cancer, its potential impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. Each patient will receive a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment. They will also receive guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information about available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary healthcare and treatment team and is part of the research program here at City of Hope.   

 
Participants in this program will meet the following criteria:
  • Diagnosis of cancer at age 21 or younger
  • At least five years since cancer diagnosis
  • Currently in remission
  • At least two years since completion of all cancer therapy
     
Highlights of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • A personalized record of cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Yearly evaluation by a team of professionals specializing in cancer survivorship. The team includes a physician, nurse practitioner, dietitian, psychologist and social worker.
  • Information about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, and for additional resources and services, if needed
  • Communication with primary healthcare provider and treatment team
 

Why do childhood cancer survivors need specialized follow-up care?

Within the last 30 years, significant progress has been made in the treatment for childhood cancer, and more and more young people are becoming cancer survivors. Sometimes, as these young people grow up, they develop complications related to their cancer treatment. Some people have no complications, but others may develop one or more problems related to their cancer treatment.
 
Complications can include problems with growth, learning, hearing, vision, the heart, lungs, thyroid gland, reproductive system, digestive tract, kidneys, bones and joints, and second cancers. Many of these complications may not become apparent for years after the treatment. In some cases, preventive measures can be taken to reduce the chances that a complication will occur.
 
Therefore, continued medical evaluation and follow-up by a team of healthcare professionals knowledgeable about long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment is expected to be an important addition to routine healthcare for all childhood cancer survivors.

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a physician or nurse practitioner who has expertise in childhood cancer and survivorship issues. These professionals work in collaboration with your treatment team and will also communicate with your primary healthcare provider, at your request, if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to specialists or services if needed, based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every year. Your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed with you by the physician or nurse practitioner. You will undergo a physical examination and have screening tests based on the treatment that you received. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on this evaluation.
 
The Survivorship Program team members will talk with you about your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will also receive a written record of your cancer treatment and follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems.
 
A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. Questions include topics such as your current health status, quality of life, emotional concerns, and cancer treatment. Additional topics include family history, general health, health habits (such as exercise) and general demographic information (such as race and education). Your answers will not only help researchers, they will be used by the Survivorship Program team to assist in determining your ongoing health needs.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide on the questionnaires, and the results of your evaluation (such as results of blood tests or physical exam findings), will be recorded in a research database. The database is password-protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study.
 
Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.
 
The goals of this research are to identify complications of childhood cancer therapy, to develop treatments or preventive measures for these complications, and to develop interventions aimed at improving the quality of life in childhood cancer survivors.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have his or her own primary healthcare provider, such as a pediatrician, family physician, internist, nurse practitioner or physician assistant, who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

How do I get more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at (626) 471-9220 or email: survivorship@coh.org.

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Team

We Invite You to Attend City of Hope's Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic.
 
This program provides once-a-year, long-term follow-up care for childhood cancer survivors in a clinical research setting

This clinic is for people who: 
 
  • Were diagnosed with cancer or a similar illness at age 21 years or younger
  • Are in remission
  • Finished treatment at least two years ago
     
During the yearly clinic visit you will see several health-care providers including:
 
  • Physician or nurse practitioner
  • Dietitian
  • Psychosocial team member
     
You will also: 
 
  • Have a health evaluation
  • Receive tips about how to stay healthy
  • Get a summary of your cancer treatment
  • Get a personalized plan for your ongoing survivorship care

At your request, a copy of your clinic visit record can be sent to all of your health-care providers.

To schedule an appointment, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9220.
 

Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program

Prostate Cancer Survivorship

 
The Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program provides specialized follow-up care for patients who have completed surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Patients who participate in this program are seen every 6 to 12 months in a clinic specially designed to meet the follow-up needs of prostate cancer survivors. Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues.  Patients in this program will receive careful monitoring for possible recurrence of their cancer and will have the opportunity to discuss their cancer treatment, its impact on their health, and ways to stay as healthy as possible.  Each patient will receive a Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of the details of their cancer treatment, with guidelines for continued monitoring, including recommendations for preventive care and information regarding available resources and services. The goal is to help each survivor stay as healthy as possible, and to prevent problems from happening or catch them early, when they are most easily treated. This program is carried out in collaboration with each patient’s primary treatment team and is part of the research program at City of Hope.
 
Highlights of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program include:
  • The Survivorship Care Plan – a personalized record of your cancer treatment and recommendations for ongoing health monitoring
  • Follow-up assessments for cancer recurrence
  • Evaluation for any long-term complications of treatment
  • Education about methods to prevent new health problems and to stay as healthy as possible
  • Screening recommendations for other cancers (such as colon cancer), according to national guidelines
  • An emphasis on healthy lifestyle practices
  • Referrals to specialists, resources, or services as needed
  • Communication with your primary healthcare provider and treatment team


Who is eligible for this program?

The following criteria must be met to be eligible for the program: -- A history of localized prostate cancer diagnosed at age 22 or older -- At least one year since diagnosis -- Received surgical treatment at City of Hope -- No current evidence of prostate cancer, or if present, the prostate cancer is in a state of stable disease -- No history of prostate cancer recurrence, progression, or metastasis (spread outside the area of the prostate gland)

Who will I see in the clinic?

Care is provided by a healthcare provider with expertise in prostate cancer care and survivorship issues, who works in collaboration with your primary treatment team and will communicate with your physician if any problems are detected. In addition, referrals are available to the social worker, dietitian, psychologist, physical therapist, or other specialists or services as needed based on your individual circumstances.

What happens at the clinic visit?

You will be seen in the long-term follow-up clinic every 6 months for the first five years after diagnosis, and then yearly thereafter. During each visit, your medical history and any symptoms you are having will be reviewed and you will undergo a physical examination and have a PSA blood test. Digital rectal examinations will be done yearly. Additional testing or referrals may be recommended, if needed, based on the results of your health history and physical examination. You will have the opportunity to discuss your diagnosis, treatment history, and ways to stay as healthy as possible. You will receive a Survivorship Care Plan that includes a written record of your cancer treatment with follow-up recommendations based on your treatment history and specific circumstances. If needed, you will also receive additional information about any treatment-related health problem(s) that you may have, along with recommendations for management of these problems. A summary of each long-term follow-up visit will be sent to your primary healthcare provider and to your primary treatment team, at your request.

What part of this program is research?

You will be asked to complete several questionnaires as part of the research related to this program. These questionnaires include assessment of symptoms that some men may experience as a result of prostate cancer treatment (such as problems with urinary, bowel, or sexual function). Additional questions are asked about your health status, family history, general health, health habits (such as smoking), and general demographic information (such as race and employment). In addition to using this information in research, your answers to many of these questions will be used by the healthcare provider to assist in determining your general state of health.

How is the information about me used in research?

Following your visit, the information you provide in the questionnaires, and the results of your clinic visit (such as PSA level and physical exam findings) will be recorded in a research database. The database is password protected and secure, and is accessible only to personnel directly involved with this study. Information entered into the database will eventually be grouped together with information for other patients enrolled in this study and analyzed, so that any significant findings can be reported to the medical community. Individual patient information will not be identified in any of these reports, and any personal information (such as name or date of birth) will be removed before any of this information is released, published or presented at scientific meetings.

Can I receive all of my medical care in the Survivorship Program?

No, the Survivorship Program does not provide primary medical care. Each patient must have their own primary healthcare provider (internist, family physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant) who is available for day-to-day health care needs. The Survivorship Program team is available for telephone consultation with the primary care provider when needed.

Is there a charge for participating in this program?

Costs for the clinic visits, PSA lab tests, and any recommended referrals or additional tests that are medically indicated based on your health evaluation are considered standard medical care and will be billed to you or your insurance company according to the usual and customary charges. There are no costs associated with the research questionnaires related to this study.

How do I find out more information or find out if I am eligible?

For more information, or to determine if you are eligible for the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Program, please contact Claudia Herrera at 626-471-9221 or email: survivorship@coh.org.
Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program Brochure

The Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program is a special program for patients who have completed treatment for cancer.
 
Programa de Supervivencia del Cáncer Infantil

 


El Programa de Supervivencia del Cáncer
Infantil es un programa especial para los
pacientes que hayan finalizado su tratamiento
para el cáncer.

 

Información en español


Para más información o para programar una cita, llame al 626-471-9220 o envíe un correo electrónico a survivorship@coh.org.

Population Sciences
The mission of the Department of Population Sciences is to advance the science and application of cancer etiology, prevention and outcomes, and reduce the burden of cancer and its sequelae across all populations, through collaborative multidisciplinary programs in clinical service, research and education.
 
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.


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  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. It takes a village. No man is an island. Choose your aphorism: It’s a simple truth that collaboration usually is better than isolation. That’s especially true when you’re trying to introduce healthful habits and deliver health care to people at risk of disease and...
  • When Maryland Governor Larry Hogan announced earlier this week that he has the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, he was giving voice to the experience of more than 71,000 Americans each year. The announcement came with Hogan’s promise to stay in office while undergoing aggressive treatment for the...
  • The spine can be affected by many different kinds of tumors. Malignant, or cancerous, tumors can arise within the spine itself. Secondary spinal tumors, which are actually much more common, begin as cancers in another part of the body, such as the breast and prostate, and then spread, or metastasize, to the spi...
  • Although most cancer occurs in older adults, the bulk of cancer research doesn’t focus on this vulnerable and fast-growing population. City of Hope and its Cancer and Aging Research Team aim to change that, and they’re getting a significant boost from Professional Practice Leader Peggy Burhenn, R.N....
  • Liz Graef-Larcher’s first brain tumor was discovered by accident six years ago. The then-48-year-old with a long history of sinus problems and headaches had been sent for an MRI, and the scan found a lesion in her brain called a meningioma – a tumor that arises in the meninges, the layers of tissue that cover a...
  • The colon and rectum are parts of the body’s gastrointestinal system, also called the digestive tract. After food is digested in the stomach and nutrients are absorbed in the small intestine, the remaining material moves down into the lower large intestine (colon) where water and nutrients are absorbed. The low...
  • If there is one truism about hospital stays it is that patients want to get out. For many, however, the joy of being discharged is tempered by the unexpected challenges that recovery in a new setting may pose. Even with professional help, the quality of care and treatment that patients receive at City of Hope [...
  • Jana Portnow, M.D., associate director of the Brain Tumor Program at City of Hope, didn’t expect to specialize in treating brain tumors. But, early in her career, she undertook a year of research on pain management and palliative care and, in that program, got to know many patients with brain tumors. After that...
  • Ask any patient: Nurses are as pivotal in their care as doctors. They answer the call of a patient in the middle of the night, they hold the patient’s hand as he or she takes on yet another round of treatment and, in the best-case scenario, they wave goodbye as the patient leaves the hospital, […]
  • Many oncologists, not to mention their patients, might think that there’s no place for mathematical analysis in the treatment of cancer. They might think that all treatment decisions are based on unique factors affecting individual patients, with no connection to other patients and their treatment regimen...
  • Within three days in 2007, Stephanie Hosford, then 37, learned that she was pregnant with her long-awaited second child – and that she had triple-negative breast cancer. Soon afterward, Hosford discovered that she and her husband, Grant, had been approved to adopt a little girl from China.  After encountering m...
  • That’s not an echo you hear, it’s another study linking weight to breast cancer risk. It’s also another reason to improve the health of our overall community. In a report published online June 11 in the journal JAMA Oncology, researchers have concluded that women who are both obese and postmenopausal face...
  • Cancer and other life-threatening illnesses can be overwhelming experiences for adults. For children, who lack the life experience and context to put their diagnosis in perspective, the treatment and follow-up can be especially isolating. City of Hope’s youngest patients recently got a chance to overcome that i...
  • When explaining breast cancer treatment options, breast cancer specialists typically discuss the best therapies currently available, working with their patients to create the most effective treatment regimens. Recently, however, City of Hope specialists – in oncology, surgery and immunology – came together to d...