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Cancer Genetics Education Program Bookmark and Share

Cancer Genetics Education Program

The Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope offers educational coursesand self-teaching tools forprofessionals in the fields of cancer and cancer genetics.ThisCancer Genetics Education Program (CGEP) is supported inpart by funding fromthe NCI (IRC4CA153828-01 andIR25CA112486).
 
Dramatic advances in our understanding of the genetic basis for cancer have led to the development of new technologies and tools for genetic cancer risk assessment. The Cancer Genetics Education Program at City of Hope offers a series of comprehensive learning tools designed to enhance the education of primary care physicians and clinical oncology professionals on the topics of cancer genetics and cancer risk assessment, and their application to patient care. Through a series of educational courses, workshops, seminars, newsletters and a direct, interactive electronic communications network, professionals can be tutored in the latest information on cancer molecular genetics, the fundamentals of obtaining an adequate family history, understanding genetic cancer risk assessment, ethical and legal complexities of genetic testing, and other current/timely topics.
 
Cancer Genetics Career Development Program
City of Hope offers an innovative  Cancer Genetics Career Development Program (CGCDP) whichprovides interdisciplinary training focused on cancer genetics and cancer prevention control research. The Traineeship is open to three applicants per year.
 
Intensive Course in Cancer Risk Assessment
City of Hope's Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics offers an annual CME/CEU-accredited multi-modal intensive course to address the need for professional training in clinical cancer genetics and research collaboration for community-based clinicians.
 
Clinical Cancer Genetics Community of Practice
City of Hope CCG Community of Practice brings cancer genetics practitioners from diverse practice settings together for professional learning, enduring patient-centered support and dynamic community-based research collaborations to promote quality care and improved patient outcomes across the U.S. and internationally.

Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN)

The Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN) is a large research group of over 40 collaborating sites in the United States, Mexico, and South America. The cornerstone of this network is the City of Hope Hereditary Cancer Research Registry (Molecular Genetic Studies in Cancer Patients and their Relatives; IRB# 96144), a prospective research registry protocol initiated at the City of Hope in 1996, by Principal Investigator Jeffrey Weitzel, MD. The registry serves as a biospecimen repository with personal and family medical history, psycho-social and clinical follow-up data, and 4-generation family pedigree. As members of the CCGCRN, research collaborators can use the message board and forums to post questions and communicate with other members in the network.
 
 
City of Hope CCGCRN Objectives
 
  • To create common and complimentary community-based, locally relevant cancer genomics/genetics research agendas, especially among underserved outreach clinics
  • To address geographic, socioeconomic, and ethnic disparities in cancer genetics healthcare and research participation
  • To leverage next-generation genomic technologies to engage/promote hereditary cancer research and clinical translation globally, with a focus in Latin America
 
General questions or comments may be submitted via email to: ccgcrn@coh.org
 
 
General links of interest:
 
Links for members:

Working Group

Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG) Working Group is a CME-accredited interdisciplinary cancer genetics case conference series conducted each week by the City of Hope clinical team. CSPPN and affiliated clinicians across the U.S. present cases from their community practices via web conferencing for discussion and recommendations on risk assessment, surveillance, risk management and identification of research eligibility for cases covering the full spectrum of hereditary cancer.

2015 Clinical Cancer Genomics Update Conference

 
"From Evidence to Action: Next-Generation Approaches to Cancer Risk Assessment and Research"
City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG), in collaboration with the University of Chicago, is excited to announce our 4th annual CME/CEU-accredited clinical cancer genetics and genomics update conference. The two-day conference will be held on Friday and Saturday, February 27 and 28, 2015, at City of Hope, Cooper Auditorium, in Duarte, CA.
 
 
 
 
Register earely and save!
 
        Conference Fee Structure*         
CCGCoP**
members:
Non-CCGCoP
members:
Physicians $200 $275
Genetic Counselors $100 $175
Nurses & other Health Professionals (NP, PA, SW) $100 $175
Industry $200 $275
Resident/Fellow $75 $125

*After 12/28/14, all fees will increase by $50.
**Affiliation with City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics CCGCoP & CCGCRN
 
  • Prices include breakfast and lunch on Friday and Saturday, and a fun-filled networking dinner on Friday evening!
 
  • A block of rooms has been secured at a rate of $132 for single occupancy and $66 for shared at the Courtyard by Marriott, Monrovia, February 26 to 28, 2015. Don’t miss out on this great rate! (Conference attendees who want to extend their stay at the hotel may contact Karen Gadsby, at  626-531-8008.)
 
 
 
(group code pending)
 
To share accommodations with another conference attendee, contact Gloria Nunez at gnunez@coh.org no later than January 31, 2015.
 
 

Clinical Cancer Genetics Events Calendar

Cancer Genetics Education Program

Cancer Genetics Education Program

The Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope offers educational coursesand self-teaching tools forprofessionals in the fields of cancer and cancer genetics.ThisCancer Genetics Education Program (CGEP) is supported inpart by funding fromthe NCI (IRC4CA153828-01 andIR25CA112486).
 
Dramatic advances in our understanding of the genetic basis for cancer have led to the development of new technologies and tools for genetic cancer risk assessment. The Cancer Genetics Education Program at City of Hope offers a series of comprehensive learning tools designed to enhance the education of primary care physicians and clinical oncology professionals on the topics of cancer genetics and cancer risk assessment, and their application to patient care. Through a series of educational courses, workshops, seminars, newsletters and a direct, interactive electronic communications network, professionals can be tutored in the latest information on cancer molecular genetics, the fundamentals of obtaining an adequate family history, understanding genetic cancer risk assessment, ethical and legal complexities of genetic testing, and other current/timely topics.
 
Cancer Genetics Career Development Program
City of Hope offers an innovative  Cancer Genetics Career Development Program (CGCDP) whichprovides interdisciplinary training focused on cancer genetics and cancer prevention control research. The Traineeship is open to three applicants per year.
 
Intensive Course in Cancer Risk Assessment
City of Hope's Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics offers an annual CME/CEU-accredited multi-modal intensive course to address the need for professional training in clinical cancer genetics and research collaboration for community-based clinicians.
 
Clinical Cancer Genetics Community of Practice
City of Hope CCG Community of Practice brings cancer genetics practitioners from diverse practice settings together for professional learning, enduring patient-centered support and dynamic community-based research collaborations to promote quality care and improved patient outcomes across the U.S. and internationally.

CCGCRN

Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN)

The Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN) is a large research group of over 40 collaborating sites in the United States, Mexico, and South America. The cornerstone of this network is the City of Hope Hereditary Cancer Research Registry (Molecular Genetic Studies in Cancer Patients and their Relatives; IRB# 96144), a prospective research registry protocol initiated at the City of Hope in 1996, by Principal Investigator Jeffrey Weitzel, MD. The registry serves as a biospecimen repository with personal and family medical history, psycho-social and clinical follow-up data, and 4-generation family pedigree. As members of the CCGCRN, research collaborators can use the message board and forums to post questions and communicate with other members in the network.
 
 
City of Hope CCGCRN Objectives
 
  • To create common and complimentary community-based, locally relevant cancer genomics/genetics research agendas, especially among underserved outreach clinics
  • To address geographic, socioeconomic, and ethnic disparities in cancer genetics healthcare and research participation
  • To leverage next-generation genomic technologies to engage/promote hereditary cancer research and clinical translation globally, with a focus in Latin America
 
General questions or comments may be submitted via email to: ccgcrn@coh.org
 
 
General links of interest:
 
Links for members:

Working Group

Working Group

Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG) Working Group is a CME-accredited interdisciplinary cancer genetics case conference series conducted each week by the City of Hope clinical team. CSPPN and affiliated clinicians across the U.S. present cases from their community practices via web conferencing for discussion and recommendations on risk assessment, surveillance, risk management and identification of research eligibility for cases covering the full spectrum of hereditary cancer.

Cancer Genetics Community Link

Cancer Genetics Community Link Discussion Board

The Cancer Genetics Community Discussion Board is a Web-based discussion board for collaborative, interdisciplinary practice-based support and continuing professional learning. CCG Community of Practice members are encouraged to post and respond to case-based questions and share resources with a growing, multidisciplinary network of professionals engaged in the practice of clinical cancer genetics. Messages are posted and archived under topic-specific forums, allowing members to search for information by topic of interest.
 
Case Consultation Questions

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Uninformative BRCA Test Results)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Testing)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Probability/Empiric Risks)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Risk Management)

Breast/Ovarian Cancers (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

Male Breast Cancers

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Lynch Related)

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Polyposis Syndromes)

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Non-Colorectal)

Gastrointestinal Cancers (Risk Management)

Genitourinary Cancer

Genodermatoses

Endocrine Neoplasias

Pediatric Cancers

ELSI-Ethical, Legal, Social Issues

 

Clinical Resources

Progeny/Pedigree Drawing Issues

 

Clinical Cancer Genetics Working Group

CCG Working Group Case Conferences

 

Comments/Suggestions

Suggestion/Comment Box

 

2015 Update Conference

2015 Clinical Cancer Genomics Update Conference

 
"From Evidence to Action: Next-Generation Approaches to Cancer Risk Assessment and Research"
City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG), in collaboration with the University of Chicago, is excited to announce our 4th annual CME/CEU-accredited clinical cancer genetics and genomics update conference. The two-day conference will be held on Friday and Saturday, February 27 and 28, 2015, at City of Hope, Cooper Auditorium, in Duarte, CA.
 
 
 
 
Register earely and save!
 
        Conference Fee Structure*         
CCGCoP**
members:
Non-CCGCoP
members:
Physicians $200 $275
Genetic Counselors $100 $175
Nurses & other Health Professionals (NP, PA, SW) $100 $175
Industry $200 $275
Resident/Fellow $75 $125

*After 12/28/14, all fees will increase by $50.
**Affiliation with City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics CCGCoP & CCGCRN
 
  • Prices include breakfast and lunch on Friday and Saturday, and a fun-filled networking dinner on Friday evening!
 
  • A block of rooms has been secured at a rate of $132 for single occupancy and $66 for shared at the Courtyard by Marriott, Monrovia, February 26 to 28, 2015. Don’t miss out on this great rate! (Conference attendees who want to extend their stay at the hotel may contact Karen Gadsby, at  626-531-8008.)
 
 
 
(group code pending)
 
To share accommodations with another conference attendee, contact Gloria Nunez at gnunez@coh.org no later than January 31, 2015.
 
 

Clinical Cancer Genetics Events Calendar

Clinical Cancer Genetics Events Calendar

Clinical Cancer Genetics
The City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics is committed to being a national leader in the advancement of cancer genetics, screening and prevention, through innovative patient care, research and education.

Contact Us
  • 800-826-HOPE (4673)
  • For more information about the Cancer Screening & Prevention Program, call 626-256-8662, ext. 2.
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
City of Hope Breakthroughs
Get the latest in City of Hope's research, treatment and news you can use on our blog, Breakthroughs.
 
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • The body’s immune system is usually adept at attacking outside invaders such as bacteria and viruses. But because cancer originates from the body’s own cells, the immune system can fail to see it as foreign. As a result, the body’s most powerful ally can remain largely idle against cancer as the disease progres...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, five City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Her...
  • Are you thinking about switching from traditional cigarettes to e-cigarettes for the Great American Smokeout? Are you thinking that might be a better option than the traditional quit-smoking route? Think again. For lung expert Brian Tiep, M.D., the dislike and distrust he feels for e-cigs comes down to this: Th...
  • Hematologist Robert Chen, M.D., is boosting scientific discovery at City of Hope and, by extension, across the nation. Just ask the National Cancer Institute. The institution recently awarded Chen the much-sought-after Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award for boosting scientific discovery at City of Hope...
  • Great strides have been made in treating cancer – including lung cancer – but by the time people show symptoms of the disease, the cancer has usually advanced. That’s because, at early stages, lung cancer has no symptoms. Only recently has lung cancer screening become an option. (Read more about the risks...
  • Identifying cures for currently incurable diseases and providing patients with safe, fast and potentially lifesaving treatments is the focus of City of Hope’s new Alpha Clinic for Cell Therapy and Innovation (ACT-I). The clinic is funded by an $8 million, five-year grant from the California Institute for Regene...
  • Cancer is a couple’s disease. It affects not just the person diagnosed, but his or her partner as well. It also affects the ability of both people to communicate effectively. The Couples Coping with Cancer Together program at City of Hope teaches couples how to communicate and solve problems as a unit. He...
  • Chemotherapy drugs work by either killing cancer cells or by stopping them from multiplying, that is, dividing. Some of the more powerful drugs used to treat cancer do their job by interfering with the cancer cells’ DNA and RNA growth, preventing them from copying themselves and dividing. Such drugs, however, l...
  • During October, everything seems to turn pink – clothing, the NFL logo, tape dispensers, boxing gloves, blenders, soup cans, you name it – in order to raise awareness for what many believe is the most dangerous cancer that affects women: breast cancer. But, in addition to thinking pink, women should...
  • In February 2003, when she was only 16 months old, Maya Gallardo was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and, to make matters much worse, pneumonia. The pneumonia complicated what was already destined to be grueling treatment regimen. To assess the extent of her illness, Maya had to endure a spinal ...
  • Former smokers age 55 to 74 who rely on Medicare for health care services have just received a long-hoped-for announcement. Under a proposed decision from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, they’ll now have access to lung cancer screening with a low-dose CT scan. The proposed decision, announ...
  • City of Hope has a longstanding commitment to combating diabetes, a leading national and global health threat. Already, it’s scored some successes, from research that led to the development of synthetic human insulin – still used by millions of patients – to potentially lifesaving islet cell transplants. Diabet...
  • Dee Hunt never smoked. Neither did her five sisters and brothers. They didn’t have exposure to radon or asbestos, either. That didn’t prevent every one of them from being diagnosed with lung cancer. Their parents were smokers, but they’d all left home more than 30 years before any of them were diagn...
  • They may not talk about it, but women with cancers in the pelvic region, such as cervical cancer, bladder cancer and uterine cancer, often have problems controlling their urine, bowel or flatus. Although they may feel isolated, they’re far from alone. Many other women have such problems, too. In fact, nea...
  • Cancer that spreads to the liver poses a significant threat to patients, and a great challenge to surgeons. The organ’s anatomical complexity and its maze of blood vessels make removal of tumors difficult, even for specialized liver cancer surgeons. Following chemotherapy, the livers of cancer patients are not ...