National Cancer Institute CURE Program

As an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope is proud to be part of the Continuing Umbrella of Research Experience (CURE) Program, which is designed to engage the scientific curiosity of promising young high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented populations who are interested in cancer research as a career. Students participating in the CURE program receive a $4,800 stipend.
 
Underrepresented populations include African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, and Pacific Islander.  CURE students work side by side with City of Hope scientists on current, challenging research projects. The CURE Program lasts 12 weeks.
 
Apply for the 2014 CURE Program
 
To apply for the CURE program, fill out the online Summer Student application and check “CURE Program applicant” to indicate your desire to be considered for the CURE program as well.
 

Christian Avalos, a senior at University of California, Riverside majoring in bioengineering was mentored by Dr. Peter Lee in the Department of Cancer Immunotherapeutics and Tumor Immunology.  His research concerned immune signaling defects in cancer.
 
Victor Bell, a senior at California State University, Dominguez Hills majoring in biochemistry was mentored by Dr. Ching-Cheng Chen in the Division of Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Leukemia Research.
 
Brittany Clarke, a rising junior at San Dimas High School was mentored by Dr. Kimlin Ashing in Ccare.  Her research involved exploring survivorship outcomes.
 
Alexander Montes, a rising junior at Pasadena City College majoring in biochemistry was mentored by Dr. Jinha Park in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology.  His project involved the characterization of Her-2 targeted murine antibodies, 8H11 and 10H8, in ovarian cancer cell lines.
 
Nathaly Perez, a rising junior at International Polytechnic High School was mentored by Dr. Kimlin Ashing in Ccare.  Her project concerned the Eat, Move, Live program conducted here at the City of Hope. 
 
Terra Sztain, a rising junior at Pasadena City College majoring in biochemistry was mentored by Dr. Dan Raz from the Department of Thoracic Surgery.
 
Alonso Tapia, a rising junior at Baylor University majoring in biochemistry was mentored by Dr. Jeffrey Weitzel from the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics.  His project concerned hereditary cancer among Latinos.
 
Silvia Trevino, a rising sophomore at Cornell University majoring in biological sciences was mentored by Dr. Jae Kim in the Department of Thoracic Surgery.  Her project involved the Triptolide affect on Mesothelioma.
 
Elizabeth Tsui, a rising sophomore at Duke University was mentored by Dr. Karen Reckamp in the Department of Medical Oncology.  Her project focused on understanding resistance to targeted therapy in lung cancer.