A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Clinical Fellowships/Residency Programs

City of Hope’s Clinical Fellowship/Residency Programs offer excellent opportunities for physicians interested in expanding their knowledge base and clinical expertise in specialty and subspecialty areas. Our clinical fellowships offer intensive didactic as well as hands-on training by instructors who have made significant contributions to cancer research and clinical practice.
 
Growing awareness of the genetic etiology of many types of cancer has driven City of Hope’s National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center to offer this innovative program, which provides rigorous interdisciplinary training focused on cancer genetics as well as cancer prevention research.
 
Director: Jeffrey Weitzel, M.D.
Co-Director: Kathleen Blazer, Ed.D., M.S., L.C.G.C.
Coordinator: Arlene Danganan
 
Physicians seeking training in bone marrow transplantation should consider our Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT) Fellowship, which provides extensive training in all aspects of transplantation research and practice. City of Hope is one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive transplant centers.

Director: Amrita Krishnan, M.D.
Coordinator: Evelyn Flores
 
This fellowship, expanded to City of Hope, offers comprehensive clinical training in diabetes and other endocrine disorders. Fellows are trained in advanced treatment modalities, including City of Hope's innovative islet cell transplantation program.
 
Director: Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D.
Coordinator: Karen Ramos
 
This fellowship offers broad-based clinical and research training in hematology and oncology with mentors who are leaders in their field.
 
Director: Lucille Leong, M.D.
Coordinator: Yolanda Tamayo
 
The Hematopathology Fellowship Program at City of Hope is a one-year ACGME accredited fellowship that emphasizes diagnostic neoplastic hematopathology, and is designed for fellows interested in either academic or community practice careers.
 
Director: Karl Gaal, M.D.
Coordinator: Guadalupe Valenzuela
 
City of Hope Neurosurgical Oncology Fellowship
The fellowship is a one year program that will offer unique and comprehensive training in the surgical and nonsurgical care of brain and spine tumor patients. Working along with the three neurosurgeons comprising the neurosurgical staff, the fellow will gain a balanced expertise in surgical, clinical and scientific aspects of brain and spinal oncology. Also, there will be exposure to our multidisciplinary team of neurointerventional radiologists and radiation oncologists.

Our goal is to prepare the fellow for a strong career in academic medicine and cultivate not only surgical skills, but also the clinical skills for creating successful surgical outcomes: precise diagnosis, conservative options, palliative care and judgment.
 
Director: Mike Chen, M.D.
Coordinator: Akweta Colbert
 
City of Hope provides academic instruction for physicians in our Radiation Oncology Residency Program—a four-year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited. The overall goal of the program is to train physicians to be outstanding radiation oncologists and to provide graduates with a solid foundation in translational and clinical research.

Director: Eric Radany, M.D.
Coordinator: Thalia Yaden
 
Even in this age of monoclonal  antibodies and gene therapy, surgical excision is still the standard of care for many solid tumors, while debulking is often helpful in palliative treatment. City of Hope’s Surgical Oncology Fellowship provides two years of thorough surgical oncology training in both clinical and research settings; the fellowship is designed to be tailored to the fellow’s individual interests.
 
Director: Joseph Kim, M.D.
Coordinator: Nicole Herrera
 
The Urology Oncology Fellowship is unique, as it focuses on clinical training in laparoscopic and minimally invasive surgical interventions. These methods are achieving routine status; therefore, it behooves forward-thinking physicians to be well-versed in their practice.
 
Director: Clayton Lau, M.D.
Coordinator: Denise Rasmussen
 

Clinical Fellowship/Residency Programs

Clinical Fellowships/Residency Programs

City of Hope’s Clinical Fellowship/Residency Programs offer excellent opportunities for physicians interested in expanding their knowledge base and clinical expertise in specialty and subspecialty areas. Our clinical fellowships offer intensive didactic as well as hands-on training by instructors who have made significant contributions to cancer research and clinical practice.
 
Growing awareness of the genetic etiology of many types of cancer has driven City of Hope’s National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center to offer this innovative program, which provides rigorous interdisciplinary training focused on cancer genetics as well as cancer prevention research.
 
Director: Jeffrey Weitzel, M.D.
Co-Director: Kathleen Blazer, Ed.D., M.S., L.C.G.C.
Coordinator: Arlene Danganan
 
Physicians seeking training in bone marrow transplantation should consider our Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT) Fellowship, which provides extensive training in all aspects of transplantation research and practice. City of Hope is one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive transplant centers.

Director: Amrita Krishnan, M.D.
Coordinator: Evelyn Flores
 
This fellowship, expanded to City of Hope, offers comprehensive clinical training in diabetes and other endocrine disorders. Fellows are trained in advanced treatment modalities, including City of Hope's innovative islet cell transplantation program.
 
Director: Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D.
Coordinator: Karen Ramos
 
This fellowship offers broad-based clinical and research training in hematology and oncology with mentors who are leaders in their field.
 
Director: Lucille Leong, M.D.
Coordinator: Yolanda Tamayo
 
The Hematopathology Fellowship Program at City of Hope is a one-year ACGME accredited fellowship that emphasizes diagnostic neoplastic hematopathology, and is designed for fellows interested in either academic or community practice careers.
 
Director: Karl Gaal, M.D.
Coordinator: Guadalupe Valenzuela
 
City of Hope Neurosurgical Oncology Fellowship
The fellowship is a one year program that will offer unique and comprehensive training in the surgical and nonsurgical care of brain and spine tumor patients. Working along with the three neurosurgeons comprising the neurosurgical staff, the fellow will gain a balanced expertise in surgical, clinical and scientific aspects of brain and spinal oncology. Also, there will be exposure to our multidisciplinary team of neurointerventional radiologists and radiation oncologists.

Our goal is to prepare the fellow for a strong career in academic medicine and cultivate not only surgical skills, but also the clinical skills for creating successful surgical outcomes: precise diagnosis, conservative options, palliative care and judgment.
 
Director: Mike Chen, M.D.
Coordinator: Akweta Colbert
 
City of Hope provides academic instruction for physicians in our Radiation Oncology Residency Program—a four-year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited. The overall goal of the program is to train physicians to be outstanding radiation oncologists and to provide graduates with a solid foundation in translational and clinical research.

Director: Eric Radany, M.D.
Coordinator: Thalia Yaden
 
Even in this age of monoclonal  antibodies and gene therapy, surgical excision is still the standard of care for many solid tumors, while debulking is often helpful in palliative treatment. City of Hope’s Surgical Oncology Fellowship provides two years of thorough surgical oncology training in both clinical and research settings; the fellowship is designed to be tailored to the fellow’s individual interests.
 
Director: Joseph Kim, M.D.
Coordinator: Nicole Herrera
 
The Urology Oncology Fellowship is unique, as it focuses on clinical training in laparoscopic and minimally invasive surgical interventions. These methods are achieving routine status; therefore, it behooves forward-thinking physicians to be well-versed in their practice.
 
Director: Clayton Lau, M.D.
Coordinator: Denise Rasmussen
 
Fellowships and Residencies
City of Hope offers a number of exciting fellowships and residencies in laboratory cancer and diabetes research, administration, clinical applications and other areas.

City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
Students and professionals at City of Hope can access a plethora of medical databases, scientific journals, course materials, special collections, and other useful resources at our 12,000 square foot Lee Graff Library.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
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