A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Pain Resource Nurse (PRN) Training Course

23rd Annual Pain Resource Nurse (PRN) Training Course
Date:
August 26, 27, 28, 2014

Featured Speaker:
Chris Pasero, M.S., R.N.-B.C., F.A.A.N.

Location:
Pasadena Hilton Hotel,
168 South Los Robles Ave,
Pasadena, CA 91101

Overview
The City of Hope Division of Nursing Research and Education is celebrating its 23rd Pain Resource Nurse (PRN) Course this coming year! This innovative course commemorates 23 years of commitment and leadership in the education of nurses in best practices for pain relief. Since the first PRN course over 2,800 nurses have attended to gain knowledge and resources to improve their own care of patients in pain and to develop the role of the pain resource nurse for their institutions.

This comprehensive three-day program includes pain assessment, pharmacologic management, equianalgesic calculations, integrative approaches, communication for better pain management, legal and ethical issues, psycho-spiritual aspects, managing pain in special populations, workshops on cancer, chronic, acute and end-of-life pain management and the future role of nurses in pain management. Participants also receive an extensive syllabus, which includes presentations, pain references, resources, and textbook to support improved pain management practice. Breakfast and lunch are included with registration.

Nurses have an essential role in providing effective and compassionate care to all patients in pain. The PRN Course equips nurses to improve care of patients in pain, strengthen their role as patient advocates, and prepares nurses to be confident members of interdisciplinary care teams.
 
 

Objectives

At the completion of this program the participants should be able to:
 
  • Describe the process of pain assessment
  • Identify current issues in pain management
  • Review the pharmacologic approaches to the management of pain and side-effect management
  • Identify issues in pain management for pediatric, elderly and other at risk populations
  • Discuss appropriate pain advocacy, ethical/legal issues, communication and education strategies
  • Explore the use of integrative approaches for pain management
  • Review resources for extending pain education in your settings
  • Discuss the evolving role of nurses in the future of pain management
  • Review professional self-care strategies

Course Information

Course Information
Contact
Maggie Johnson
mjohnson@coh.org
626-256-4673, ext. 63202
Accreditation
16.5 CE credits for full attendance of course. CE's to be provided by City of Hope Beckman Research Institute, approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 13380. You can attend 1, 2 or all 3 days.  You will receive CE credits for each full day you attend.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
City of Hope has a long-standing commitment to Continuing Medical Education (CME), sharing advances in cancer research and treatment with the health-care community through CME courses such as conferences, symposia and other on and off campus CME opportunities for medical professionals.

Learn more about
City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
 
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