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Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS) Program Bookmark and Share

Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS)

Arti Hurria, M.D., Co-leader
Susan L. Neuhausen, Ph.D., Co-leader
Program Members-If you would like an updated membership list, please contact Kim Lu at kilu@coh.org.
 
The mission of the Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS) Program is to advance the science and application of cancer etiology, prevention and outcomes, and reduce the burden of cancer and its sequelae across all segments of the population through collaborative, multidisciplinary efforts. The CCPS team brings together expertise in these areas, fostering an interactive, cancer-focused research environment. The CCPS mission will be accomplished through the following scientific goals:
 
Goal 1: To identify host and environmental factors contributing to development of cancer and develop approaches for risk assessment, risk reduction and early detection of cancer
 
Goal 2: To describe health-related outcomes and quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients
 
Goal 3: To develop, implement and evaluate interventions to reduce cancer-related morbidity and mortality, and improve QOL from diagnosis and treatment, through survivorship and end-of-life
 
Goal 4: To understand causes of disparities in cancer risk assessment and outcome, and develop targeted interventions to reduce disparities
 
Goal 5: To disseminate evidence-based research results through structured educational initiatives
 
CCPS conducts highly focused, hypothesis-driven and interactive research from etiology, prevention and early detection of cancer through symptom management, cancer survivorship and end-of-life issues. These research activities serve as a platform for interventional and educational initiatives. The Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education(CCARE)facilitates the comprehensive cancer center's ability to provide cancer education to underserved populations. The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides state of the art comprehensive care long-term to cancer survivors, but in the setting of clinical research.
 
CCPS Members' Research
Members of the CCPS Program represent broad expertise in cancer etiology and prevention, genetic risk assessment, QOL and end-of-life care, outcomes and cancer survivorship. The underlying theme that unifies the CCPS Program is research in a wide range of disciplines related to cancer control and population sciences. Members of this program interface with the basic science, translational and clinical research programs to integrate laboratory and clinical studies with population-based studies.
 

Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS) Program

Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS)

Arti Hurria, M.D., Co-leader
Susan L. Neuhausen, Ph.D., Co-leader
Program Members-If you would like an updated membership list, please contact Kim Lu at kilu@coh.org.
 
The mission of the Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS) Program is to advance the science and application of cancer etiology, prevention and outcomes, and reduce the burden of cancer and its sequelae across all segments of the population through collaborative, multidisciplinary efforts. The CCPS team brings together expertise in these areas, fostering an interactive, cancer-focused research environment. The CCPS mission will be accomplished through the following scientific goals:
 
Goal 1: To identify host and environmental factors contributing to development of cancer and develop approaches for risk assessment, risk reduction and early detection of cancer
 
Goal 2: To describe health-related outcomes and quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients
 
Goal 3: To develop, implement and evaluate interventions to reduce cancer-related morbidity and mortality, and improve QOL from diagnosis and treatment, through survivorship and end-of-life
 
Goal 4: To understand causes of disparities in cancer risk assessment and outcome, and develop targeted interventions to reduce disparities
 
Goal 5: To disseminate evidence-based research results through structured educational initiatives
 
CCPS conducts highly focused, hypothesis-driven and interactive research from etiology, prevention and early detection of cancer through symptom management, cancer survivorship and end-of-life issues. These research activities serve as a platform for interventional and educational initiatives. The Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education(CCARE)facilitates the comprehensive cancer center's ability to provide cancer education to underserved populations. The Center for Cancer Survivorship provides state of the art comprehensive care long-term to cancer survivors, but in the setting of clinical research.
 
CCPS Members' Research
Members of the CCPS Program represent broad expertise in cancer etiology and prevention, genetic risk assessment, QOL and end-of-life care, outcomes and cancer survivorship. The underlying theme that unifies the CCPS Program is research in a wide range of disciplines related to cancer control and population sciences. Members of this program interface with the basic science, translational and clinical research programs to integrate laboratory and clinical studies with population-based studies.
 
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City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

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NEWS & UPDATES
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