CIRM Creativity Awards Program
The City of Hope is proud to be part of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Creativity Awards program.  The CIRM Creativity Awards support summer internship programs that introduce high school students to stem cell science and developmental biology research, expose them to cutting edge medical research, foster their creativity and promote stem cell education and awareness amongst them. The Creativity Awards program is also intended to educate and broaden the participation in stem cell research by young individuals representing the diversity of California’s population, including those hindered by economic constraints. In order to foster creative thinking and approaches, the program will encourage participation by students who have a strong interest in both science and in a second creative discipline.  We encourage students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds to participate in this program.
 
In 2013 the CIRM Creativity Program at the City of Hope included:
  • Lectures focusing on potential disease treatments using stem cells.
  • Art Lectures on higher mathematics and how science can conserve artifacts and important historical structures.
  • Three field trips for the students around Los Angeles: (1) The Getty Conservation Institute and Museum, (2) Natural History Museum (photos) and (3) The Institute For Figuring (photos).
  • Workshops on making crochet coral reefs, public speaking and drug marketing.
  • A trip to the annual CIRM Creativity Awards Poster Day in San Francisco.
  • A music parody song and video to “Party in the USA” by Miley Cyrus (Click here)

Apply for the 2014 CIRM Creativity Program

To apply for the CIRM Creativity program, you must be a Californian high school student.  Fill out the online Summer Student application and check “Stem Cell Research” to indicate your desire to be considered for the CIRM Creativity program as well.
 
2013 CIRM Creativity Students

Alexander Cheng, a junior at Diamond Bar High School, California, was mentored by Dr. Hsun Teresa Ku in the department of Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Research.  His project focused on whether stem cells from the adult pancreas can proliferate and differentiate into endocrine colonies In Vitro.
 
Christina Ren, a junior at Monte Vista High School in Danville, California, was mentored by Dr. Ching-Cheng Chen in the division of Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Leukemia Research.  Her research was on Leukemia stem cell to stroma interaction: the role of leukemia-derived exosome on osteogenic differentiation.
 
Margaret Shen, a senior at Mission San Jose High School, California, was mentored by Dr. Ren-Jang Lin in the department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.  Her research focused on characterizing the effects of ZRS2 mutants in Myelodysplastic Disorders.  She is now a freshman at Stanford University.
 
Michelle Tran, a junior at Mira Costa High School in Manhattan Beach, California, was mentored by Dr. Mike Chang in the department of Information Sciences.  Her project was determining factors influencing neural stem cells’ targeting of tumor sites using machine learning.
 
Jessica Wang, a junior at Walnut High School, California, was mentored by Dr. Huiqing Wu in the department of Pathology.  Her research was on the extraction of genomic DNA from frozen patient specimens for the study of transposable elements in human cancer, leukemia and stem cells.
 
Steven Wang, a sophomore at The Harker School in San Jose, California, was mentored by Dr. Peter Lee in the department of Cancer Immunotherapeutics and Tumor Immunology.  His project concerned the systematic analysis of synergistic drug pairs to uncover the significant role of stem cell related genes in breast cancer.
 
Vanessa Yu, a junior at Arcadia High School, California, was mentored by Dr. David Ann in the department of Molecular Pharmacology.  Her research concerned tumor initiating cells in K-RasG12V mutation induced tumorigenesis in salivary glands.
 
Ted Zhu, a sophomore at Walnut High School, California, was mentored by Dr. Ren-Jang Lin in the department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.  His research project was designing a CRISPR/Cas9 system to study the role of the ZRS2 in Myelodysplastic Disorders.
 
In 2012 the CIRM Creativity Program at the City of Hope included:

• Lectures focusing on therapeutic implementation of stem cells, and ethics of stem cell research.
• Lectures on the “Art in Science”.
• Three field trips for the students to expose them to Los Angeles resources: (a) Natural History Museum, (b) Griffith Observatory and (c) Owl Biomedical (a local biotechnology company).
• Workshops on drug marketing and enhancing your creativity.
• A trip to the annual CIRM Creativity Awards Poster Day at Stanford.
• A music parody song and video to “Broken Hearted” by Karmin (click here)
• A flashmob in the City of Hope library (click here)
 
2012 CIRM Creativity Students
 
Adam He, a junior at Shanghai Community International School, China was mentored by Dr. Karen Aboody in the department of Neurosciences.  His research project was working with a fibrin matrix for delivering therapeutic stem cells.  He also represented the program at the CIRM annual Creativity Awards poster day by giving an oral presentation.
 
Jessica Hsueh, a senior at Gabrielino High School in San Gabriel, California, was mentored by Dr. Ravi Bhatia in the Department of Stem Cell and Leukemia Research.  Her research involved investigating the effects of inhibitors on the JAK2 Gene in leukemia stem cell lines.  She is now a freshman at UCLA.
 
Riana Lo Bu, a senior at Flintridge Prepatory in La Caňada Flintridge, California, was mentored by Dr. Yanhong Shi in the department of Neurosciences.  Her project focused on characterizing Oct-4 activating small molecule compounds in reprogramming mouse fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells.  She is now a freshman at MIT.
 
Jennifer Ly, a senior at Oxford Academy in Cypress, California, was mentored by Dr. Yanhong Shi in the department of Neurosciences.  Her research was studying how miR-9 regulates glioblastoma stem cell proliferation and self-renewal.  She is now a freshman at UCLA.
 
Jackie Olive, a junior at Polytechnic School in Pasadena, California, was mentored by Dr. John Rossi in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.  Her project was divided into two sections.  The first was studying MicroRNAs delivered by polyamidoamine dendrimers.  The second part (using methodology from the first) was how to moderate cardiac differentiation in mouse embryonic stem cells.  Jackie sang on the music parody.
 
Juhee Shah, a junior at Gretchen A. Witney High School in Cerritos, California, was mentored by Dr. Ivan Toderov in the Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  Her research involved searching for cell surface markers to identify progenitor/stem cells in the human pancreas.  Juhee participated in the flashmob and is one of the three original dancers.
 
Yujiao Sun, a junior at Arcadia High School, California, was mentored by Dr. Ren-Jang Lin in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.  Her project involved using site-specific-nuclease to introduce spliceosomal mutations in stem cells to study myelodysplastic syndromes. 
 
Emily Sun, a sophomore at Arcadia High School, California, was mentored by Dr. Robert Hickey in the Department of Radiation Biology.  Her research involved the proteomic analysis of glioblastoma stem cells.