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Urologic Oncology Surgery including Prostate Cancer Surgery

In recent years, medical researchers have discovered more effective ways to treat prostate cancer than ever before.

That is especially true at City of Hope. As one of the world’s leading cancer treatment facilities, we have a staff of highly respected physicians trained in the most advanced techniques.
 
City of Hope was one of the first cancer centers in the country to adopt this amazingly precise, minimally invasive surgical technology. The procedure requires five tiny incisions. First, a pencil-thin laparoscope (a lighted tube with a video camera) is inserted, so live images can be transmitted to a computer. Through the remaining incisions, four slender robotic arms with miniature surgical instruments go to the surgical site. The surgeon sits at a nearby console, viewing the procedure while using grippers to remotely control the tiny tools.

Because the robotic arms can rotate 360 degrees, these instruments can move with a full range of motion as they cut and suture with great precision. A highly magnified real-time three-dimensional image helps the surgeon avoid delicate nerves and muscles surrounding the prostate. Less surgical trauma means less risk of side effects for our patients.

Patients who undergo robotic surgery experience less pain and recover faster. Typically, recovery from conventional surgery takes three to four days in the hospital, and up to six weeks at home. With robotic-assisted surgery, the hospital stay is reduced to one or two days. Recovery time is only two to three weeks — less than half as long as traditional surgery.

With smaller incisions, patients also experience less blood loss. This helps reduce the need for transfusions, keeps blood pressure stable, and lowers the risk of complications. Patients typically emerge from surgery stronger, and can get back to normal life sooner.

Finally, because robotic-assisted surgery does not require a large abdominal incision, there’s less pain and less need for pain medicine. Most patients are on their feet within hours of surgery.

Visit our Urologic Cancers program for more information and watch videos about our robotic prostatectomy.
 

Urologic Oncology Surgery

Urologic Oncology Surgery including Prostate Cancer Surgery

In recent years, medical researchers have discovered more effective ways to treat prostate cancer than ever before.

That is especially true at City of Hope. As one of the world’s leading cancer treatment facilities, we have a staff of highly respected physicians trained in the most advanced techniques.
 
City of Hope was one of the first cancer centers in the country to adopt this amazingly precise, minimally invasive surgical technology. The procedure requires five tiny incisions. First, a pencil-thin laparoscope (a lighted tube with a video camera) is inserted, so live images can be transmitted to a computer. Through the remaining incisions, four slender robotic arms with miniature surgical instruments go to the surgical site. The surgeon sits at a nearby console, viewing the procedure while using grippers to remotely control the tiny tools.

Because the robotic arms can rotate 360 degrees, these instruments can move with a full range of motion as they cut and suture with great precision. A highly magnified real-time three-dimensional image helps the surgeon avoid delicate nerves and muscles surrounding the prostate. Less surgical trauma means less risk of side effects for our patients.

Patients who undergo robotic surgery experience less pain and recover faster. Typically, recovery from conventional surgery takes three to four days in the hospital, and up to six weeks at home. With robotic-assisted surgery, the hospital stay is reduced to one or two days. Recovery time is only two to three weeks — less than half as long as traditional surgery.

With smaller incisions, patients also experience less blood loss. This helps reduce the need for transfusions, keeps blood pressure stable, and lowers the risk of complications. Patients typically emerge from surgery stronger, and can get back to normal life sooner.

Finally, because robotic-assisted surgery does not require a large abdominal incision, there’s less pain and less need for pain medicine. Most patients are on their feet within hours of surgery.

Visit our Urologic Cancers program for more information and watch videos about our robotic prostatectomy.
 
Quick Links
Meet our doctors: Urologist Jonathan Yamzon on curingtesticular cancer

Meet our doctors: Urologist Jonathan Yamzon on curing testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men 15 to 34 years old. Yet it accounts for only 1 percent of all cancers in men in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, ...

May 31, 2014

 
Urologic cancers: Dispatches from research’s frontlines

Urologic cancers: Dispatches from research’s front lines

Urologic cancers, including prostate cancer, kidney cancer and bladder cancer, are diagnosed in more than 381,000 Americans each year, and almost 60,000 people die from the diseases. City of Hope’s ph...

March 28, 2014

 
Meet our doctors: Surgeon Jennifer Linehan on prostatecancer

Meet our doctors: Surgeon Jennifer Linehan on prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer affecting men, with one in six American men receiving the diagnosis in their lifetime. In most cases, the disease grows slowly and causes no p...

December 7, 2013

 
City of Hope surgeon Laura Crocitto, M.D., talks aboutvitamin E and prostate cancer

City of Hope surgeon Laura Crocitto, M.D., talks about vitamin E and prostate cancer

You may have heard talk on the news about a link between vitamins and prostate cancer. A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association  reveals that men should be more aware of the...

October 17, 2011

 
Why should men care about prostate cancer?

Why should men care about prostate cancer?

Timothy Wilson, M.D., Director, Prostate Cancer Program and Chief of the Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology Cancers at City of Hope, discusses why men should pay attention to prostate canc...

October 10, 2011

 
Urologic Cancers - Advances in Research and Treatments
 
Timothy Wilson, M.D.: Pauline & Martin Collins Family Chair in Urology, talks about City of Hope advances in research and treatments of urologic cancers.
 
For more information on prostate cancer: Watch the City of Hope prostate cancer YouTube playlist.
Urology and Urologic Oncology Research

City of Hopes's Division of Urology strives to improve quality of care through innovative research that helps expand our understanding of urologic cancers. This brochure provides the key areas of research and studies our division is focusing on.
 
 
The Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology at City of Hope offers a Fellowship in Urologic Oncology with special emphasis on minimally invasive and robotic techniques.
Clinical Trials
Our aggressive pursuit to discover better ways to help patients now – not years from now – places us among the leaders worldwide in the administration of clinical trials.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
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  • When it comes to research into the treatment of hematologic cancers, City of Hope scientists stand out. One study that  they presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology suggests a new standard of care for HIV-associated lymphoma, another offers promise for the treatment of re...
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  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the Rose Parade is “Inspiring Stories.”...
  • The holidays can create an overwhelming urge to give to people in need — especially to sick children and families spending the holidays in a hospital room. That’s a good thing. Holiday donations of toys and gifts can bolster the spirits, and improve the lives, of people affected by illness, and hospitals ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” Here...
  • Cancer has a way of “talking” to the immune system and corrupting it to work on its own behalf instead of defending the body. Blocking this communication would allow the immune system to see cancer cells for what they are – something to be fought off – and stop them from growing. A breakthrough Scientists [R...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” By V...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” The ...
  • On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.” In 2...
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