A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Virology Bookmark and Share

Virology

City of Hope’s Department of Virology strives to better understand the origin and development of herpes simplex virus and other herpes viruses, the biology of cytomegalovirus (a prime concern for HIV-infected and other immunocompromised patients such as transplant recipients), vaccine development and experimental therapies using gene transfer vectors such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus. Viral vectors have shown great promise in treating both cancers and HIV.

John A. Zaia, M.D., chair of the department, plays an integral role in the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Program’s efforts to understand the biology of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-related pneumonitis, which was a major limitation to the success of bone marrow transplantation, and later went on to develop the gene therapy program at City of Hope, focused on treatment of HIV with genetically modified stem cells and T cells.

The Department of Virology comprises more than 50 personnel, including professors, associate professors, support scientists, postdoctoral fellows, research associates, laboratory aides and administrative support.
 
Laboratory Research

John Zaia, M.D. – Antiviral Research
Zaia, department chair, joined City of Hope from Harvard in 1980. He directs two clinical research labs, the Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Lab and the HIV Lab, with interests in antiviral development in the area of herpes viruses and HIV. The CMV laboratory studies the immunobiology of CMV infection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with emphasis on immune factors necessary for protection. The HIV laboratory focuses on developing new treatments for HIV/AIDS using optimal genetic vectors for anti-HIV gene transfer and novel drug therapy.

Edouard Cantin, Ph.D. – Neurovirology and Neuroimmunology
Cantin is director of the Laboratory of Neurovirology and Neuroimmunology. He investigates the role of the host immune response in the pathogenesis herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in vivo, with particular emphasis on CNS infections and the regulation of latency. His laboratory is also investigating the mechanisms by which intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) act as a potent immunomodulatory drug to suppress virus induced hyper-inflammatory responses that in the CNS culminate in fatal encephalitis following infection with HSV or West Nile virus, or fatal pneumonia following infection with highly pathogenic influenza virus strains, such as pandemic H1N1. A long-term interest is to understand the genetic basis of innate resistance to HSV, as this may suggest rational approaches to controlling recurrent infections, and the development of serious diseases such as encephalitis.
 
Saswati Chatterjee, Ph.D. – Gene Therapy
Chatterjee directs the Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Laboratory and is interested in the biology of AAV vectors for therapeutic gene transfer. Her specific areas of interest include stem cell-based genetic therapies of acquired and inherited diseases, including HIV infection, cancer, cardiovascular and genetic diseases; virus discovery research in human stem cells and the study of genetic elements necessary for optimal gene-based therapies. She evaluates gene therapy approaches in both in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical models, with targeted progression toward clinical human gene therapy trials.

Jiing-Kuan Yee, Ph.D.Modeling human diseases with stem cells
Dr. Yee is interested in using cell reprogramming and gene editing to establish ex vivo human genetic disease models to explore the underlying disease mechanisms and develop therapeutic strategies for treatment.  He has established fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from spinal muscular atrophy and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients.  He is studying the phenotypes of cells differentiated from these iPSC lines to understand the pathogenesis of the disease.  He is also using gene editing technology to modify the genome of the iPSCs to explore the possibility of treating these diseases with cell replacement therapy.
 
Experimental Therapeutics
The Department of Experimental Therapeutics was formed to address priorities in vaccine research that will potentially impact patient outcomes at City of Hope and other cancer centers worldwide.

Virology Faculty

Virology

Virology

City of Hope’s Department of Virology strives to better understand the origin and development of herpes simplex virus and other herpes viruses, the biology of cytomegalovirus (a prime concern for HIV-infected and other immunocompromised patients such as transplant recipients), vaccine development and experimental therapies using gene transfer vectors such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus. Viral vectors have shown great promise in treating both cancers and HIV.

John A. Zaia, M.D., chair of the department, plays an integral role in the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Program’s efforts to understand the biology of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-related pneumonitis, which was a major limitation to the success of bone marrow transplantation, and later went on to develop the gene therapy program at City of Hope, focused on treatment of HIV with genetically modified stem cells and T cells.

The Department of Virology comprises more than 50 personnel, including professors, associate professors, support scientists, postdoctoral fellows, research associates, laboratory aides and administrative support.
 
Laboratory Research

John Zaia, M.D. – Antiviral Research
Zaia, department chair, joined City of Hope from Harvard in 1980. He directs two clinical research labs, the Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Lab and the HIV Lab, with interests in antiviral development in the area of herpes viruses and HIV. The CMV laboratory studies the immunobiology of CMV infection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with emphasis on immune factors necessary for protection. The HIV laboratory focuses on developing new treatments for HIV/AIDS using optimal genetic vectors for anti-HIV gene transfer and novel drug therapy.

Edouard Cantin, Ph.D. – Neurovirology and Neuroimmunology
Cantin is director of the Laboratory of Neurovirology and Neuroimmunology. He investigates the role of the host immune response in the pathogenesis herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in vivo, with particular emphasis on CNS infections and the regulation of latency. His laboratory is also investigating the mechanisms by which intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) act as a potent immunomodulatory drug to suppress virus induced hyper-inflammatory responses that in the CNS culminate in fatal encephalitis following infection with HSV or West Nile virus, or fatal pneumonia following infection with highly pathogenic influenza virus strains, such as pandemic H1N1. A long-term interest is to understand the genetic basis of innate resistance to HSV, as this may suggest rational approaches to controlling recurrent infections, and the development of serious diseases such as encephalitis.
 
Saswati Chatterjee, Ph.D. – Gene Therapy
Chatterjee directs the Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Laboratory and is interested in the biology of AAV vectors for therapeutic gene transfer. Her specific areas of interest include stem cell-based genetic therapies of acquired and inherited diseases, including HIV infection, cancer, cardiovascular and genetic diseases; virus discovery research in human stem cells and the study of genetic elements necessary for optimal gene-based therapies. She evaluates gene therapy approaches in both in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical models, with targeted progression toward clinical human gene therapy trials.

Jiing-Kuan Yee, Ph.D.Modeling human diseases with stem cells
Dr. Yee is interested in using cell reprogramming and gene editing to establish ex vivo human genetic disease models to explore the underlying disease mechanisms and develop therapeutic strategies for treatment.  He has established fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from spinal muscular atrophy and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients.  He is studying the phenotypes of cells differentiated from these iPSC lines to understand the pathogenesis of the disease.  He is also using gene editing technology to modify the genome of the iPSCs to explore the possibility of treating these diseases with cell replacement therapy.
 
Experimental Therapeutics
The Department of Experimental Therapeutics was formed to address priorities in vaccine research that will potentially impact patient outcomes at City of Hope and other cancer centers worldwide.

Virology Faculty

Virology Faculty

Overview
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.
 
 
Research Departments/Divisions

City of Hope is a leader in translational research - integrating basic science, clinical research and patient care.
 

Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Our Scientists

Our research laboratories are led by the best and brightest minds in scientific research.
 

City of Hope’s Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences equips students with the skills and strategies to transform the future of modern medicine.
Develop new therapies, diagnostics and preventions in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • To say that myelofibrosis patients need more treatment options would be an understatement. The severely low platelet counts, known as thrombocytopenia, that are one of the hallmark symptoms of the disease can lead to chronic fatigue and weakness that not only damage quality of life but, ultimately, shorten life...
  • Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer often stop responding to the primary drugs used against the disease, leaving them with few options and little hope. Determined to increase those options, doctors and researchers at City of Hope are conducting two clinical trials that could lead to new treatments for pe...
  • Investigators working at City of Hope are making many significant inroads against many forms of cancer. To do that, they have to take a variety of approaches. Molecular oncology researchers focus on abnormal cancer-associated activity in a cell’s nucleus. One especially prominent factor in many breast and ovari...
  • In light of the new breast cancer screening guidelines, which call for women to have mammograms every other year from age 50 to 74, it’s more important than ever for women to understand their individual risk. On Monday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task force released new breast cancer screening guideline...
  • Cancer patients need, and deserve, more than medical care. They and their families need high-quality supportive care – that is, care that addresses their physical, emotional and spiritual well-being. Health care professionals increasingly understand this, but starting such programs from scratch isn’t easy...
  • Each year, City of Hope patients given another chance at life gather to pose for a picture like this one. Going on its 39th year, the celebration of patients free of blood cancers thanks to bone marrow or stem cell transplants has grown such that a photographer has to scale a cherry picker just to […]
  • Cancer patients who are participating in early-stage clinical trials need extra emotional and physical support due to their additional stress and often unique symptoms. Now an effort by researchers at City of Hope to create a model for such support has received a $6.8 million grant from the National Cancer Inst...
  • The need for improvements in treating malignant brain tumors has never been greater. Survival for many patients with these tumors are sometimes measured in just months. One reason that therapeutic options are limited is that traditional surgery is deemed too risky for many brain tumors, especially for those in ...
  • “Honestly, there’s nothing special about my story,” protested Daniel Samson, as he bounced Layla, his 3 1/2-year-old daughter, on his lap and put on a video for her to watch. “I just want to tell it for my own sake, and share it with other men who may be going through this chaos.” Samson spoke […]
  • As far back as he can remember, Jonathan Yamzon, M.D., wanted to be a doctor. “I knew it from the get-go,” he said, matter-of-factly. “I always envisioned it as the ideal; the supreme thing one could do with one’s life.” The youngest of six children, Yamzon was barely a toddler when his family moved to [&...
  • There’s never a “good” time for cancer to strike. With testicular cancer, the timing can seem particularly unfair. This disease targets young adults in the prime of life; otherwise healthy people unaccustomed to any serious illness, let alone cancer. And suddenly … “I can only imagine what they must...
  • Sure, a healthy lifestyle can lower a person’s risk, but the impact of specific actions is harder to tease out. Diet, exercise, tobacco use, nutritional supplements, alcohol consumption … How important are each of these factors, individually? Does strict adherence to (or rejection of) one get you a pass o...
  • Health care decisions are tough. They’re even tougher when you – or loved ones – have to make them without a plan or a conversation. National Healthcare Decisions Day, on April 16,  is a nationwide initiative to demystify the health care decision-making process and encourage families to start talking. Ult...
  • The statistics, direct from the American Cancer Society, are sobering: Cancer death rates among African-American men are 27 percent higher than for white men. The death rate for African-American women is 11 percent higher compared to white women. Hispanics have higher rates of cervical, liver and stomach cancer...
  • “Lucky” is not usually a term used to describe someone diagnosed with cancer.  But that’s how 34-year-old Alex Camargo’s doctor described him when he was diagnosed with thyroid cancer — the disease is one of the most treatable cancers at all stages. That doctor was ultimately proved righ...