Breakthroughs Blog

City of Hope has so many breakthroughs in cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS - and so many stories - that we've tailored our blog, Breakthroughs, to provide something for every reader. Whether the breakthroughs are about medical research, treatment advances or personal triumphs, they're all connected.

Inside the California Teachers Study: The Future

March 8, 2017 | Stephanie Smith

The California Teachers Study, a more than two-decade long study of more than 133,000 teachers, started in 1994. James Lacey, Ph.D., who now runs the study, wants to pool data from this and other studies to create a personalized prevention tool.

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Inside the California Teachers Study: The Teachers

March 4, 2017 | Stephanie Smith

The California Teachers Study, a more than two-decade long study of more than 133,000 teachers, started in 1994. Bridget Marshall, a former patient and current employee at City of Hope, one of the centers out of which the study is run, also has been a participant in the California Teachers Study for more than two decades.

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Inside the California Teachers Study: The Finding

March 2, 2017 | Stephanie Smith

The California Teachers Study, a more than two-decade long study of more than 133,000 teachers, started in 1994. Just before the study started, Leslie Bernstein, a researcher at City of Hope cancer center, was making a big splash in breast cancer research.

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Inside the California Teachers Study: The Statistician

March 1, 2017 | Stephanie Smith

The California Teachers Study, a more than two-decade long study of more than 133,000 teachers, started in 1994, but its eventual principle investigator, Leslie Bernstein of City of Hope, was dreaming about making her mark -- and making a difference -- long before then.

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Does alcohol really cause 7 types of cancer?

August 29, 2016 | City of Hope

City of Hope comments on a recent study that has found “strong evidence” that alcohol causes seven types of cancer - oropharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colon, rectum and breast cancer - and “probably others” such as pancreas, prostate and skin cancer.

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Remember those New Year's resolutions? They can help reduce cancer risk

February 26, 2016 | City of Hope

It’s never too late to take a few simple steps to reduce your risk of cancer. Try marking National Cancer Prevention Month by adding the good – or dropping a few bad – behaviors you thought about at the start of the New Year.

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5 Important Ways to Observe World Cancer Day and reduce your cancer risk

February 1, 2016 | City of Hope

As World Cancer Day puts a global spotlight on this challenging disease on Feb. 4, the event’s theme – “We can. I can.” – reminds us the fight begins on a personal level. Each person can make a lifestyle change to have a better shot against cancer, such as becoming more active, losing weight, or quitting smoking.

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Breast cancer: The return to wellness begins when treatment ends

October 5, 2015 | Robin Rauzi

Completing treatment for breast cancer produces a wave of relief — but one that can quickly be overwhelmed by feelings of anxiety and confusion. Together, the emotions add up to: “What now?”
 
The need for emotional and physical support doesn’t stop when treatment ends, said Linda Klein, manager of operations for the Sheri & Les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center at City of Hope. Research and medical advances mean more people than ever before are surviving cancer, Klein said, “but that brings to light many new needs and concerns about living post-treatment.”
 

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Researcher Spotlight: Leslie Bernstein, award-winning mentor

September 23, 2015 | Laurel DiGangi

Leslie Bernstein's groundbreaking research study identified the link between physical activity and the reduced risk of breast cancer. Leslie Bernstein's work speaks for itself. As an internationally renowned biostatistician and epidemiologist, the director of City of Hope’s Division of Cancer Etiology and interim chair of the Department of Population Sciences has earned significant accolades for her groundbreaking 12-year research study, begun in 1982, which identified the link between physical activity and the reduced risk of breast cancer.

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