Researchers Use Nanoparticles to Test Treatment for Liver Disease

June 25, 2018 | Katie Neith

In an effort to improve options for those with liver cancer, a group of researchers have identified a way of potentially treating a broad range of liver diseases and perhaps even other types of cancer.

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Really Big Data: How Genomics Is Poised to Reshape Cancer Care

November 9, 2017 | Abe Rosenberg

The exploding field of cancer genomics is enabling that kind of prediction for a growing number of inherited cancers, like identifying one of the many genes beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations linked to breast cancer.

Hereditary colon cancer day will bring families together

July 6, 2016 | City of Hope

The Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope and the Hereditary Colon Cancer Foundation will be holding a free conference called Hereditary Colon Cancer Family Day. The all-day event will bring together families affected by hereditary colon cancer syndromes and provide access to medical experts for a day of education, socialization and support.

Breast cancer: A new era in research enhances patient care

October 2, 2015 | Kelly Lopez

City of Hope scientists and doctors are on the forefront in the fight against breast cancer, conducting research that will ultimately result in less invasive and more effective treatments for women worldwide.

Discovering tools for genetic testing – and teaching others to use them

March 22, 2015 | Nicole White

The understanding of the relationship between genetics and cancer risk continues to grow, with more genetic testing than ever before available to patients. City of Hope leaders have created a program to teach clinicians nationwide and worldwide how to use available genetic testing tools.

New screening panel could target BRCA mutations common to Hispanic women

February 18, 2015 | Nicole White

Although many Hispanic women face a high risk of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes – increasing their risk of breast and ovarian cancer – screenings for these mutations can be prohibitively expensive in Mexico and other Latin American countries.

Breast cancer genetic testing: How one family took control

January 5, 2015 | Nicole White

Betsy Sauer and her four daughters share plenty in common. They’re smart and successful.  They’re funny, ranging from wryly witty to wickedly hilarious. Their hobbies tend toward the active and adventurous: hiking, rock climbing, skiing, swimming, fishing, kayaking, yoga and horseback riding.

Breast cancer risk: 6 things you can do to reduce (not eliminate) risk

October 14, 2014 | Nicole White

The leading risk factor for breast cancer is simply being a woman. The second top risk factor is getting older. Many breast cancer risk factors, such as gender and aging, cannot be controlled. But lacing up for a walk a few times a week can put a dent in breast cancer risk.

Breast cancer among minorities: Access to care is critical to saving lives

October 13, 2014 | Nicole White

All women are at some risk of developing the disease in their lifetimes, but breast cancer, like other cancers, has a disproportionate effect on minorities. While breast cancer is most common among white women, minority women, especially African-American women, are more likely to die from the disease.

New gene mutation, in PALB2, is linked to heightened breast cancer risk

August 8, 2014 | Nicole White

Twenty years ago, scientists discovered that a mutation in a gene now widely known as BRCA1   was linked to a sharply increased risk of breast cancer, paving the way for a new chapter in identifying women at risk of the disease and giving them options to potentially avoid an aggressive cancer.

AACR 2014: Where 'meaningful advances' against cancer begin

April 5, 2014 | Hiu Chung So

More than 18,000 researchers, clinicians, advocates and other professionals will convene at the 105th American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting taking place in San Diego from April 5 to 9.