Rahul Jandial, M.D., Ph.D.: Pediatric Neurosurgery Humanitarian Missions

March 13, 2018 | Denise Heady

Fourteen years ago, neurosurgeon and scientist Rahul Jandial, M.D., Ph.D., began to travel to underserved countries to perform brain surgeries on disadvantaged children.

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Cancer Urban Legend: Cancer Runs in My Family, I Can’t Reduce My Risk

February 13, 2018 | Abe Rosenberg

As knowledge of cancer's genetic nature expands, so do the treatment options. Learn more from Thomas Slavin, M.D., clinical geneticist at City of Hope.

Reeling in the Past: Research Gives New Life to Old Model of DNA Looping

November 29, 2017 | Katie Neith

Every so often, as City of Hope’s Arthur Riggs, Ph.D., knows well, “forgotten” work can provide groundbreaking insight for new research years later.

What You Should Know About Inherited Breast Cancer

October 25, 2017 | Abe Rosenberg

When Ming was first diagnosed with breast cancer, she knew she'd need surgery. But at her doctor's urging she also took an additional step, scheduling a session with a City of Hope genetic counselor.

Genetic Tests Showing Small Cancer Risk Do Not Change Behavior

December 13, 2016 | Katie Neith

Swabbing the inside of your mouth and sending a saliva sample through the mail for analysis is one of the easiest and least invasive ways to test for a multitude of health risks. But a new study by City of Hope researcher Stacy Gray, M.D., reveals that at-home genetic tests don’t change behavior, even when they reveal an elevated risk of cancer.

Genetic Tests Showing Small Cancer Risk Do Not Change Behavior

December 13, 2016 | Katie Neith

Swabbing the inside of your mouth and sending a saliva sample through the mail for analysis is one of the easiest and least invasive ways to test for a multitude of health risks. But a new study by City of Hope researcher Stacy Gray, M.D., reveals that at-home genetic tests don’t change behavior, even when they reveal an elevated risk of cancer.

Breast Cancer: 'It's supposed to be a woman's disease'

June 15, 2016 | Stephanie Smith

Male breast cancer is unusual. Breast cancer being cast as “a woman’s disease” means men aren’t checking for it and therefore tend to be diagnosed later. Despite the paltry number of cases, being vigilant is important for men - a lesson Don Hoffman learned the hard way.

Biomarker linked to survival and treatment for BRCA-positive breast cancer patients

June 8, 2016 | H. Chung So

For breast cancer patients with BRCA gene mutations, compounds called poly ADP ribose (or PAR) can help determine treatment response and clinical outcomes.

Breast cancer genetic testing: How one family took control

January 5, 2015 | Nicole White

Betsy Sauer and her four daughters share plenty in common. They’re smart and successful.  They’re funny, ranging from wryly witty to wickedly hilarious. Their hobbies tend toward the active and adventurous: hiking, rock climbing, skiing, swimming, fishing, kayaking, yoga and horseback riding.

Cancer in your family history? Your genes are not your destiny

November 21, 2014 | Valerie Zapanta

When it comes to cancer, your family history may provide more questions than answers: How do my genes increase my risk for cancer? No one in my family has had cancer; does that mean I won’t get cancer? What cancers are common in certain populations and ethnicities? City of Hope experts have some guidance.

What are my genes telling me about my cancer risk?

October 27, 2014 | Valerie Zapanta

Genetics, genes, genome, genetic risk ... Such terms are becoming increasingly familiar to even nonresearchers as studies and information about the human make-up become more extensive and more critical.

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