Rahul Jandial, M.D., Ph.D.: Pediatric Neurosurgery Humanitarian Missions

March 13, 2018 | Denise Heady

Fourteen years ago, neurosurgeon and scientist Rahul Jandial, M.D., Ph.D., began to travel to underserved countries to perform brain surgeries on disadvantaged children.

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‘Engage and Educate’: Veronica Jones, M.D., on Addressing Health Disparities

February 19, 2018 | Robert Young

City of Hope's Veronica Jones, M.D., is doing her part to engage African-American communities and raise awareness of the importance of breast cancer preventive care.

Bridging The Gap: Educating Minority Communities About Cancer Prevention

July 31, 2017 | Dory Benford

At City of Hope, the Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education (CCARE), seeks to facilitate better communication with minority patients, particularly about cancer prevention, by fostering strong partnerships with various community organizations.

Meet Our Doctors: Veronica Jones Is Pushing the Limits of Breast Cancer Treatment

May 4, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

Veronica Jones, M.D., decided to become a breast cancer surgeon in order to impact women’s health and help those women at an extremely vulnerable time.

A Serious Lack of Trust: The Unhealthy Relationship Between Minorities and Health Care

April 5, 2017 | Josh Jenisch

There are numerous barriers to addressing health care disparities. There are financial obstacles and issues of access. But looming over everything is a more intractable foe: a persistent, pervasive lack of trust in the health care system.

Minorities and cancer: One factor can make a difference – exercise

April 10, 2015 | Abe Rosenberg

The minorities and cancer statistics are grim, with African-American men and women having considerably higher death rates from the disease. City of Hope is working to erase those disparities. One way is by promoting exercise.

Breast cancer among minorities: Access to care is critical to saving lives

October 13, 2014 | Nicole White

All women are at some risk of developing the disease in their lifetimes, but breast cancer, like other cancers, has a disproportionate effect on minorities. While breast cancer is most common among white women, minority women, especially African-American women, are more likely to die from the disease.

Peer program helps black women during, and after, breast cancer

February 24, 2014 | Nicole White

After adjusting to the rigors of a cancer patient’s schedule – a barrage of appointments with surgeons, oncologists, radiologists, chemotherapy treatments, surgeries, tests – cancer survivors have large adjustments to make.

Life after breast cancer: Too many black women don't receive follow-up

February 16, 2014 | Nicole White

As the nation commemorates Black History Month, a City of Hope researcher is calling attention to the fact that a shocking 15 percent of African-American breast cancer survivors do not receive annual follow-up mammograms after their treatment stops.

Minority Cancer Awareness Week: End disparities now

April 14, 2013 | Tami Dennis

Cancer knows no boundaries: It affects men and women, the young and the old, the rich and the poor, and people from all ethnic backgrounds. But, in the U.S., cancer has a disproportionate impact on minorities.

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