Breakthroughs Blog

City of Hope has so many breakthroughs in cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS - and so many stories - that we've tailored our blog, Breakthroughs, to provide something for every reader. Whether the breakthroughs are about medical research, treatment advances or personal triumphs, they're all connected.

Obesity and breast cancer risk
Obesity & Cancer Risk: What’s the Connection?

August 30, 2017 | City of Hope

Some risk factors for cancer are out of your control. You can’t change your genetic history, for example. But many factors that increase the risk of developing cancer are within your control.

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Karimi-Misagh
'The Power to Change': Meet Misagh Karimi, M.D.

August 15, 2017 | Travis Marshall

At City of Hope, Misagh Karimi, M.D.’s passion for working with patients has developed into a dedication and focus on patient education.

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breakthroughs - cancer cells
Researchers discover sugar-addiction of cancer cells in childhood leukemia

July 10, 2017 | Katie Neith

According to a new article in Nature, a team led by City of Hope’s Markus Müschen, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, thinks that sugar uptake and energy supply may play a key role in the relapse of ALL.

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James Lacey
Forget the Fads: Three Real Ways to Reduce Your Cancer Risk

February 27, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

The race to reduce your cancer risk is a marathon, not a sprint. And while it is impossible to prevent cancer, there are strategies that, when implemented consistently over your lifetime, may lower your risk of cancer. We spoke to James V. Lacey Jr., Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor at City of Hope's Division of Cancer Etiology, about the practices he recommends for leading a healthier lifestyle and in doing so, reducing your cancer risk.

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obesity
Even when an obese person loses weight, health problems could persist due to epigenetics

July 18, 2016 | Letisia Marquez

When an obese person loses weight, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, as well as liver, colon and breast cancers and other diseases linked to obesity, diminishes, right? That might not be the case. A new study by City of Hope researchers found that even after a low-fat diet is consumed, long-term disease risks could persist.

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Breakthroughs - National Public Health Week
National Public health week: Reducing cancer risk starts in childhood

April 6, 2016 | City of Hope

City of Hope is launching a multifaceted five-year initiative aimed at reducing cancer risks through better nutrition, particularly for children, made possible with the help of a $2.5 million grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation.

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Breakthroughs - Cancer death rate declined - 256x256
Cancer death rate declined, but still more prevention is needed

January 18, 2016 | Letisia Marquez

There’s good news to celebrate on the cancer front: Early cancer detection, cancer prevention efforts and better treatments resulted in a 23% decline in the cancer death rate over the last two decades, according to the American Cancer Society’s annual statistics report.

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Awasthi-Sanjay
Metabolic disease: Who's at risk? What can be done? (w/PODCAST)

September 28, 2015 | City of Hope

Metabolism is the chemical processes that occur within a living organism in order to maintain life. But what causes disorders of the metabolism, including diabetes?

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Misagh Karimi
The link between obesity and cancer risk (w/PODCAST)

July 26, 2015 | City of Hope

Misagh Karimi specializes in hematology-oncology at City of Hope ǀ Corona. Many Americans understand that obesity is tied to heart disease and diabetes but, according to a new survey , too few – only 7 percent – know that obesity increases the risk of cancer.

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Obesity and breast cancer risk
Obesity and breast cancer: The risk is real. Now we must help reduce it

June 13, 2015 | Tami Dennis

That’s not an echo you hear, it’s another study linking weight to breast cancer risk. It's also another reason to improve the health of our overall community. Obesity and breast cancer risk: The link is real.

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