Breakthroughs Blog

City of Hope has so many breakthroughs in cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS - and so many stories - that we've tailored our blog, Breakthroughs, to provide something for every reader. Whether the breakthroughs are about medical research, treatment advances or personal triumphs, they're all connected.

lung cancer
Radiotherapy: New developments in the treatment of lung cancer

August 8, 2017 | City of Hope

Radiation is an important part of the cancer treatment toolkit, and it can be effective in treating lung cancer. Helen Chen, M.D., a radiation oncologist in the Department of Radiation Oncology at City of Hope, recently discussed the pros, cons and latest developments in radiotherapy for lung cancer.

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Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer at City of Hope
Radiotherapy for breast cancer: Classic technology, modern advances

August 1, 2017 | City of Hope

For the most part, radiation is the same radiation doctors have been using for decades. But in recent years, there have been major advances in the ways that Kim and his colleagues plan for and administer that therapy. Those advances equal big benefits for patients.

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molecular oncology
To fight cancer, these researchers go where the action is – the nucleus

April 21, 2015 | Rachel Hall

Molecular oncology researchers explore a cancer cell's nucleus for new ways to fight tumors. Investigators working at City of Hope are making many significant inroads against many forms of cancer. To do that, they have to take a variety of approaches.

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popsicles
Diet during cancer treatment: Tips to ease dry mouth

September 8, 2014 | Dominique Grignetti

Cancer treatment can take a toll on the mouth, even if a patient's cancer has nothing to do with the head or throat, leading to a dry mouth, or a very sore mouth, and making it difficult to swallow or eat.

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Jeffrey Wong
Meet our doctors: Jeffrey Wong on the future of radiation therapy

September 6, 2014 | Valerie Zapanta

Radiation oncology is one of the three main specialties involved in the successful treatment of cancer, along with surgical oncology and medical oncology. Experts in this field, known as radiation oncologists, advise patients as to whether radiation therapy will be useful for their cancer – and how it can best be safely and effectively delivered.

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Jae Jung, skin cancer expert
Meet our doctors: Dermatologist Jae Jung on preventing melanoma

August 23, 2014 | Kim Proescholdt

With Labor Day just around the corner, summer is on its way out. But just because summertime is ending doesn't mean we can skip sunscreen. Protection from ultraviolet (UV) radiation is needed all year round.

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Bhatia, Smita
Even low doses of chest radiation in childhood boost breast cancer risk

August 13, 2014 | Darrin Joy

Radiation therapy can help cure many children facing Hodgkin lymphoma and other cancers. When the radiation is delivered to a girl’s chest, however, it can lead to a marked increase in breast cancer risk later in life.

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Head and neck
ASCO 2014: Lower radiation dose effective for HPV-positive head and neck cancers

May 30, 2014 | Denise Heady

Patients diagnosed with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancers could be treated with a lower-dose of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, reducing the risks of side effects, according to a new study.

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Radiation linked to lower lymphedema risk in breast cancer patients

April 30, 2014 | Nicole White

For some breast cancer patients whose cancer has also spread to their axillary lymph nodes, radiation might be a better option than surgically removing the nodes, a new study suggests. A new study finds radiation poses a lower risk of lymphedema for women treated for breast cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes than removing the nodes.

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New study connects mutant enzyme to cancer's 'Warburg effect'

April 22, 2014 | Hiu Chung So

Cancer cells may be known for their uncontrollable growth and spread, but they also differ from normal tissue in another manner: how they produce energy. New City of Hope study finds that a cancer-prone mutation of the gene RECQ4 causes its corresponding enzyme, RECQ4, to accumulate in the mitochondria (the green and orange structures in above illustration of a cell's components.

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