Breakthroughs Blog

City of Hope has so many breakthroughs in cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS - and so many stories - that we've tailored our blog, Breakthroughs, to provide something for every reader. Whether the breakthroughs are about medical research, treatment advances or personal triumphs, they're all connected.

5 Tests Every Man Under 55 Needs

March 10, 2017 | Dory Benford

It’s vital to undergo certain exams that can detect cancer early and improve your chance of cure even when you feel perfectly fine. We spoke to Cary Presant, M.D., about the five tests every man aged 55 and under needs to take, whether you’re experiencing specific symptoms or not.

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For testicular cancer patient Matt Hebert, it was all about options

April 11, 2016 | City of Hope

While Matt found a treatment option that worked for him at City of Hope, the greater takeaway of his story is the importance of vigilance and awareness when it comes to watching for symptoms of testicular cancer – a disease that although rare in comparison to other cancers, develops most often in young men.

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Testicular cancer patient: 'I didn't feel like just a patient'

April 15, 2015 | Abe Rosenberg

“Honestly, there's nothing special about my story,” protested Daniel Samson, as he bounced Layla, his 3 1/2-year-old daughter, on his lap and put on a video for her to watch. “I just want to tell it for my own sake, and share it with other men who may be going through this chaos.

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Testicular cancer doctor: Jonathan Yamzon says patients 'inspire me'

April 14, 2015 | Abe Rosenberg

As far back as he can remember, Jonathan Yamzon , M.D., wanted to be a doctor. Testicular cancer expert Jonathan Yamzon says of his patients: "They inspire me. ... It's a privilege to usher and guide them on this journey.

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Testicular cancer program's goal: Return patients to normal life

April 13, 2015 | Abe Rosenberg

There's never a “good” time for cancer to strike. With testicular cancer, the timing can seem particularly unfair. This disease targets young adults in the prime of life; otherwise healthy people unaccustomed to any serious illness, let alone cancer.

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Cancer Insights: Make testicular cancer entirely, not highly, curable

April 6, 2015 | Sumanta Kumar Pal M.D.

The American Society of Clinical Oncology , a group that includes more than 40,000 cancer specialists around the country, recently issued a list of the five most profound cancer advances over the past five decades.

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Second opinion: A cancer surgeon shares his perspective and advice

July 23, 2014 | Valerie Zapanta

Diagnostic errors are far from uncommon. In fact, a recent study found that they affect about 12 million people, or 1 in 20 patients,  in the U.S. each year. Diagnosed with cancer? Get a second opinion at an expert research and treatment center like City of Hope.

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Meet our doctors: Urologist Jonathan Yamzon on curing testicular cancer

May 31, 2014 | Kim Proescholdt

Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men 15 to 34 years old. Yet it accounts for only 1 percent of all cancers in men in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, about 8,800 men are diagnosed with testicular cancer each year, and about 380 men die of the disease.

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Meet our doctors: Julie Wolfson on cancer in teens, young adults

November 15, 2013 | Kim Proescholdt

Adolescents and young adults ( AYAs ) with cancer have different needs and treatment challenges than children or older adults. They're a unique population because they don’t fit into a distinct group, often falling into a gap between cancer treatment programs designed for children and those designed for adults.

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Testicular cancer, 'a disease of younger men,' can be caught early

March 31, 2013 | Tami Dennis

Testicular cancer doesn’t bear thinking about for most men and, indeed, it seems to elicit few headlines or public discussions. But that doesn’t mean that men, especially young men, shouldn’t be aware of the symptoms.

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