City of Hope Reveals Vision for World-Class Cancer Care in Orange County

June 25, 2019 | City of Hope

City of Hope has accelerated its plans for a $1 billion comprehensive cancer campus in Orange County, bringing highly specialized cancer care, clinical trials, precision medicine and early detection to the nation’s sixth most populous county.

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What You Should Know About Inherited Breast Cancer

October 25, 2017 | Abe Rosenberg

When Ming was first diagnosed with breast cancer, she knew she'd need surgery. But at her doctor's urging she also took an additional step, scheduling a session with a City of Hope genetic counselor.

Men and Breast Cancer: Should You Be Tested?

July 25, 2017 | City of Hope

What many people don’t realize is that men, too, can experience breast cancer. Though much rarer in men than in women, about 2,470 new cases of male breast cancer will be diagnosed in 2017, according to the American Cancer Society.

New Treatments and Personalized Care Offer Hope for Stomach Cancer Patients

January 6, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

Although it is uncommon in the U.S., stomach cancer is a serious, often devastating disease. But less than 25 percent of patients who are diagnosed with stomach cancer in the U.S. survive for five years. City of Hope’s physicians and scientists are committed to changing this.

Study: Increased genetic testing in young breast cancer patients

February 16, 2016 | Valerie Howard

More young breast cancer patients are relying on genetic testing to make informed surgical decisions. According to a new study, published online in JAMA Oncology, nearly all women under 40 years old surveyed in 2013, had undergone BRCA testing within a year of a breast cancer diagnosis, with the vast majority of those who tested positive opting for a double-mastectomy.

Is genetic testing for cancer risk right for you? What you need to know

January 28, 2016 | Travis Marshall

Cancer researchers, like those at City of Hope, have come to understand that mutations in certain genes can mean a higher likelihood of getting certain types of cancer. That’s why genetic testing to identify these mutations has become an important tool in figuring out people’s risk of getting cancer in their lifetimes.