Breakthroughs Blog

City of Hope has so many breakthroughs in cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS - and so many stories - that we've tailored our blog, Breakthroughs, to provide something for every reader. Whether the breakthroughs are about medical research, treatment advances or personal triumphs, they're all connected.

Genetics
Really Big Data: How Genomics Is Poised to Reshape Cancer Care

September 28, 2017 | Abe Rosenberg

The exploding field of cancer genomics is enabling that kind of prediction for a growing number of inherited cancers, like identifying one of the many genes beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations linked to breast cancer.

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Critical Diabetes Research Resource Granted $10 Million from NIH

September 22, 2017 | Katie Neith

Since 2002, City of Hope has been the coordinating center to support the Integrated Islet Distribution Program that provides for the distribution of human islets for biomedical research to diabetes researchers worldwide.

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Family in Need Given Vehicle to Make the 200-mile Trip to City of Hope

September 20, 2017 | Michael Easterling

Thanks to a resourceful social worker, a determined physician and a compassionate community, the Jiminez family recently was gifted a new car with which to make the 200-mile trip to City of Hope for treatment.

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community science fair
Community Science Festival lets kids be scientists for a day

September 14, 2017 | Denise Heady

Sometimes it takes a real-life scientist to show kids that science can actually be fun. And on Saturday, September 16, 2017, City of Hope researchers will do just that at the third Community Science Festival.

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Krissy Kobata - Mixed Race Bone Marrow Transplants | City of Hope
#TeamKrissy Raises Awareness of Need for Mixed-race Bone Marrow Donors

September 11, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

A mere 4 percent of those on the bone marrow transplant registry are of mixed-race background, making it very difficult for those in this population to find a donor.

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Chad and dr. forman
ThinkCure! Weekend: First pitch symbolizes new beginning for college baseball player

September 4, 2017 | Denise Heady

To help kick off Hodgkin lymphoma patient Chad Bible's journey back to Division 1 level play, Bible threw the ceremonial first pitch with his physician Stephen J. Forman at Dodger Stadium during City of Hope’s annual ThinkCure! Weekend.

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Obesity and breast cancer risk
Obesity & Cancer Risk: What’s the Connection?

August 30, 2017 | City of Hope

Some risk factors for cancer are out of your control. You can’t change your genetic history, for example. But many factors that increase the risk of developing cancer are within your control.

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Mayra Serrano, M.P.H., C.H.E.S.
Bridging The Gap: Educating Minority Communities About Cancer Prevention

July 31, 2017 | Dory Benford

At City of Hope, the Center of Community Alliance for Research & Education (CCARE), seeks to facilitate better communication with minority patients, particularly about cancer prevention, by fostering strong partnerships with various community organizations.

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Monica Curiel, City of Hope patient, author
Young Lymphoma Survivor Pens Children’s Book

July 12, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

Monica Curiel was 19 years old, a freshman in college, when diagnosed. Now a survivor, her book, Stella's Picture Day, for pediatric cancer patients, was published in May 2016.

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City of Hope Researcher Receives Grant to Improve Cognitive Outcomes in Young Cancer Patients

July 7, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

Sunita Patel, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist in the Population Sciences and Supportive Care Medicine departments at City of Hope, has received a $1.22 million grant from the American Cancer Society to test a new approach toward preventing long-term chemotherapy-related cognitive side effects in childhood cancer survivors from bilingual and Spanish-speaking families.

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