Breakthroughs Blog

City of Hope has so many breakthroughs in cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS - and so many stories - that we've tailored our blog, Breakthroughs, to provide something for every reader. Whether the breakthroughs are about medical research, treatment advances or personal triumphs, they're all connected.

Breakthroughs - Poems that inspire cancer patients
Poems To Inspire Cancer Patients

May 5, 2017 | Dory Benford

To overcome a life-threatening illness like cancer, remaining motivated and inspired is vital. We asked our Facebook community members to share the poetry that has given them strength, motivation and solace during their cancer journeys.

Continue Reading

stock image asian patient
6 Questions Foreign Language Speakers Should Ask Their Providers (and Themselves)

April 10, 2017 | Stephanie Smith

City of Hope is dedicating every day in April, National Minority Health Month, to beginning to examine important issues of disparity in health care. This installment is about tips for overcoming cultural rifts and language barriers in interactions between the health care system and different Asian-American groups.

Continue Reading

April - Minority Month - Mona NEW
Language, cultural norms clash with optimal care for some Asian-Americans

April 7, 2017 | Stephanie Smith

City of Hope is dedicating every day in April, National Minority Health Month, to beginning to examine important issues of disparity in health care. This installment is about the stresses, cultural rifts and language barriers in interactions between the health care system and different Asian-American groups.

Continue Reading

Thomas E. Starzl
Doctors honor the Legacy of Transplant Pioneer Thomas Starzl

March 7, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

Doctors nationwide are mourning the loss of Thomas E. Starzl, the surgeon and researcher who pioneered the liver transplant and the medications that made the procedure successful in the long term. Starzl died on March 4 at his home in Pittsburg at age 90.

Continue Reading

colorectal cancer screening
Make March the Month You "Screen to Save"

March 2, 2017 | City of Hope

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and the second deadliest. Despite those grim statistics, in most states less than 20 percent of racial and ethnic minorities have been screened for CRC within the past year. For physicians and scientists at City of Hope, that number is far too low.

Continue Reading

samantha hoops
Model Samantha Hoopes Finds Inspiration at City of Hope

February 27, 2017 | Samantha Bonar

Samantha Hoopes may be best known for her appearances in Carl’s Jr. commercials or gracing the pages of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue. But the Los Angeles-based model was recently thrilled to make a visit to City of Hope, where she discovered “a new family.”

Continue Reading

Becky McIntyre-Velasquez, bell donation
Survivors' bell gives cancer patients extra ring of hope

February 15, 2017 | Denise Heady

A survivors' bell hanging in City of Hope’s main Duarte campus has been rung by more than 200 patients since it was donated by ovarian cancer survivor Becky Velazquez-McIntyre two summers ago. And now she is taking the survivor bell ritual to the rest of the 13 City of Hope community practice sites.

Continue Reading

Patrice and Eric 2
How Couples Can Conquer Cancer Together

February 14, 2017 | Dory Benford

The physical, mental and emotional impact of a cancer diagnosis can shake the foundation of even the most solid relationship, but by communicating openly, working together as a team and developing a new normal, the experience can actually bring couples closer than ever before.

Continue Reading

Breakthroughs - Kimlin Ashing
New Website Addresses Health Risks Facing African Americans

February 13, 2017 | City of Hope

City of Hope, along with the National Urban league, Anthem and Pfizer, recently announced the launch of Take Action for Health, a free interactive website aimed at reducing some of the greatest health risks facing the African American community today: breast cancer, heart disease and emotional well-being.

Continue Reading

Load More
Back To Top