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Vu Nguyen Ngo, Ph.D.

  • Assistant Professor, Division of Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Leukemia Research, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope

Vu Nguyen Ngo, Ph.D.

研究重點 :
  • Leukemia and Lymphoma Biology
Vu Ngo is an award-winning researcher who joined City of Hope in 2010 to study Hematologic Malignancies and Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Leukemia at our Beckman Research Institute. A member of the Toni Stephenson Lymphoma Center, He is investigating abnormal signal pathways in B cells – white blood cells produced in bone marrow – which can lead to the development of lymphoma.
 
Dr. Ngo earned a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences from University of California, San Francisco, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Cancer Institute. In 2012 he was honored multiple times, receiving the American Society of Hematology Scholar Award, the Stop Cancer Award and the Margaret E. Early Medical Research Award.
  • 2010-present, Member, Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences, City of Hope, Duarte, California
  • 2010-present, Member, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California
  • 2010-present, Assistant Professor, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, California
  • 2007-2010, Staff Scientist, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
  • 2006-2007, Research Fellow, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
  • 1998, Teaching Assistant, Department of Anatomy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
  • 1994-1996, Research Technician, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California
  • Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Leukemia Research

學位

  • 1996-2001, Ph.D. Biomedical Sciences, Thesis Advisor: Dr. Jason G. Cyster, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
  • 1992-1994, B.A. Molecular Cell Biology, Research Mentor: Dr. Astar Winoto, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California

臨床研究醫師

  • 2001-2006, Post-Doctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Louis M. Staudt, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
  • Margaret E. Early Medical Research Trust
  • Stop Cancer Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation Seed Grant
  • Tim Nesvig Foundation
  • American Society of Hematology Scholar Award
  • Stop Cancer Foundation Career Development Grant
  • Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation For Cancer Research Award
  • Department of Defense, Peer Review Cancer Research Program Career Development Award
 

Leukemias and lymphomas can occur when there is perturbation in the normal development and activation of B cells.  Germinal centers are the critical environment in which antigen-activated B cells further develop and differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or memory B cells.  Within germinal centers, B cells diversify the antibody repertoire by somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin genes.  This process subjects B cells to potential loss of genomic integrity through aberrant mutations and chromosomal breakage.  Indeed, many lymphomas frequently bear these abnormal genetic alterations, some of which have been implicated as causal factors of lymphomagenesis through disruption of signal transduction pathways that regulate normal cellular proliferation and survival (Science 319: 1676-9 (2008); Nature 463: 88-92 (2010)). The research in our laboratory aims to discover abnormal signal transduction pathways and elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of germinal center-derived B cell tumors as well as other hematologic malignancies.  Our approaches combine genome-scaled functional genetic screens using RNA interference technology in tumor cell line models with validation in human primary tumor biopsies and mouse models.  Better understanding the molecular basis of aberrant signal transduction pathways critical for cancer growth will allow us to identify effective molecular targets and devise better therapeutic strategies for cancer treatments.

  • 2014, City of Hope Excellence Research Award
  • 2014-2017, Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation for Cancer Research Award
  • 2013-2015, Stop Cancer Career Development Award
  • 2012-2015, American Society of Hematology Scholar Award
  • 2012, Stop Cancer Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation Seed Grant
  • 2012, Margaret E. Early Medical Research Trust Award
  • 2011-2014, Tim Nesvig Lymphoma Fellowship
  • 2004-2006, NIH Cancer Research Training Award
  • 2001-2004, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Postdoctoral Fellowship
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