Behnam Badie, M.D.
Dr. Badie, Vice Chair and Professor at the Department of Surgery, received his MD from UCLA.  Dr. Badie's research focuses on exploring novel immunotherapeutic strategies through the activation of microglia and macrophages to treat malignant brain tumors. He is also developing minimally invasive devices to deliver drugs into brain tumors.  
 
Mark Boldin, Ph.D. 
Dr. Boldin, Associate Professor at the Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, received his PhD from Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel). His current research focuses on defining the contribution of both microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs to the regulation of gene expression during hematopoiesis and the activation of immune responses.
 
Christine Brown, Ph.D. 
Dr. Brown, Research Professor at the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received her PhD from UC Berkeley. As Associate Director of the T Cell Therapeutic Research Laboratory, she provides scientific oversight for the pre-clinical research program, as well as the development and refinement of CAR T cells.  
 
Edouard Cantin, Ph.D. 
Dr. Cantin, Professor at the Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, received his PhD from Cambridge University.  Dr. Cantin’s research focuses on defining the mechanism by which herpes simplex virus contributes to encephalitis and keratitis, and dissecting the immunological responses that the host mounts against the virus.
 
Mingye Feng, Ph.D. 
Dr. Feng, Assistant Professor at the Department of Immuno-Oncology, received his PhD from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  Dr. Feng's research is directed at understanding the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated immunosurveillance with the ultimate goal of developing novel anti-cancer immunotherapies. 
 
Stephen Forman, M.D. 
Dr. Forman, Chair and Professor at The Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received his MD from University of Southern California. Dr. Forman's research is focused on developing genetically engineered CAR T cells to promote adoptive immunotherapy in the treatment of a wide range of cancers.  
 
Marcin Kortylewski, Ph.D. 
Dr. Kortylewski, Associate Professor at the Department of Immuno-Oncology, received his PhD from the University School of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland. His research is directed at developing a novel oligonucleotide approach to specifically target immune cells associated with tumors and attenuate STAT3's activity in promoting tumor growth.
 
Peter Lee, M.D. 
Dr. Lee, Chair of the Department of Immuno-Oncology, received his MD from UC San Diego. His team utilizes high-dimensional flow cytometry, quantitative spatial image analysis and next-generation genomics to dissect how cancer impacts host immune responses in patients, and to develop novel treatments to restore their immune function.  
 
Edwin Manuel, Ph.D.  
Dr. Manuel, Assistant Professor at the Department of Immuno-Oncology, received his PhD from Harvard University. Dr. Manuel is interested in understanding the escape mechanisms used by tumors to avoid immune recognition. He also developed a novel shRNA technology to down-regulate enzymes that contributes to immune suppression to improve immunotherapy. 
 
Assistant Professor, Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received his PhD from UCLA.  His laboratory focuses on developing CAR T therapies for solid tumors and optimizing novel T cell engineering approaches for clinical translation.
 
Bart Roep, M.D., Ph.D. 
Bart Roep, the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinhuished Chair in Diabetes and chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology, received his PhD from Leiden University. His laboratory focuses on understanding the cause of immune response to insulin-producing beta cells and developing new strategy to modulate and desensitize immune response to beta cells for the cure of type 1 diabetes.
 
Zuoming Sun, Ph.D. 
Dr. Sun, Professor at the Department of Molecular Imaging & Therapy, received his PhD from Duke University. His research team focuses on understanding the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of T cell activation so as to develop effective and safe treatments for immune disorders. 
 
Assistant Professor, Department of Systems Biology, received her PhD from USC.  Her lab focuses on identifying non-cytotoxic and targeted immunotherapies for treating oncogene addicted B and T cell malignancies driven by genomic rearrangements.
 
Dr. Wang, Assistant Professor in Immuno-Oncology and Pediatrics, received his MD and PhD from the University of Chicago.  The lab uses protein-focused techniques to identify non-genetic determinants of functional differences in benign and malignant blood cells, and to understand CAR T cell signaling and function. The lab also performs CAR T cell clinical trials in pediatric brain tumor patients.
 
Research Professor, Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received her PhD from University of Oslo.  Her work focuses on pre-clinical and translational research on CAR T cell therapy for hematological malignancy and HIV.
 
Hua Yu, Ph.D.  
Dr. Yu, Professor of the Department of Immuno-Oncology, received her PhD from Columbia University. Dr. Yu's research team examines the role of STAT3 in mediating the tumor microenvironment.  The eventual goal is to devise therapies to target STAT3 leading to tumor death.
 
Jianhua Yu, Ph.D.
Dr. Yu, Professor at the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received his PhD from Purdue University. His research team focuses on engineering CAR Natural Killer cells, CAR T cells, oncolytic virus and bispecific antibodies, natural product-based strategies and hematopoietic cell transplantation for cancer therapy.
 
Defu Zeng, M.D. 
Dr. Zeng, Professor of Diabetes Immunology, received his PhD from Fujian Medical University. His laboratory focuses on understanding the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease, which is a major obstacle in allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation for the treatment of hematological malignancies.