Genomics & Epigenetics

Adam Bailis, Ph.D.
Dr. Bailis, Associate Professor at the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, received his PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Dr. Bailis's research is focused on understanding the genetic control regulating genome stability and the consequences of loss of this genetic control.
 
Andrea Bild, Ph.D.
Dr. Bild, Professor at the Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research, received her PhD from University of Colorado, Denver. Her research team uses large-scale translational genomic and pharmacological studies to interrogate and treat tumor heterogeneity and evolution to refractory states. 
 
Mark Boldin, Ph.D. 
Dr. Boldin, Associate Professor at the Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, received his PhD from Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel). His current research focuses on defining the contribution of both microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs to the regulation of gene expression during hematopoiesis and the activation of immune responses.
 
John Burnett, Ph.D. 
Dr. Burnett, Assistant Professor at the Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, received his PhD from UC Berkeley. His laboratory focuses on engineering biological therapeutics, such as specialized RNA aptamers for targeted delivery and genome editing technologies, for genetic and infectious diseases.  
 
Edouard Cantin, Ph.D. 
Dr. Cantin, Professor at the Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, received his PhD from Cambridge University.  Dr. Cantin’s research focuses on defining the mechanism by which herpes simplex virus contributes to encephalitis and keratitis, and dissecting the immunological responses that the host mounts against the virus.
 
Daniela Castanotto, Ph.D.
Dr. Castanotto, Research Professor at the Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research, received her PhD from University of Messina, Italy. Dr. Castanotto’s research focuses on the development of technology to promote uptake and activity of oligonucleotides as a potential means of targeting genes and affecting expression.
 
Saswati Chatterjee, Ph.D. 
Dr. Chatterjee, Professor at the Department of Surgery, received her PhD from McGill University, Canada.  Dr. Chatterjee's research is directed at using recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus vectors to genetically modify hematopoietic stem cells with the ultimate goal of treating an array of diseases including HIV and cancer.
 
Chun-Wei (David) Chen, Ph.D. 
Dr. Chen, Assistant Professor at the Department of Systems Biology, received his PhD from University of Rochester. His laboratory focuses on dissecting the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the therapeutic resistance in cancers, as well as developing leading-edge technology in precision epigenome editing and transcriptional regulations. 
 
Jianjun Chen, Ph.D. 
Dr. Chen, Professor at the Department of Systems Biology, received his PhD from Chinese Academy of Sciences. His team focuses on basic and translational research associated with RNA/DNA epigenetics, especially N6 methyl-adenosine (m6A) RNA modification and TET protein mediated DNA methylation, in the development and drug response of cancers. 
 
Wenyong Chen, Ph.D. 
Dr. Chen, Associate Professor at the Department of Cancer Biology, received his PhD from University of Alabama at Birmingham. His laboratory is interested in understanding epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging, leukemia development and drug resistance in leukemia stem cells.
 
Zhen Chen, Ph.D. 
Dr. Chen, Assistant Professor at the Department of Diabetes Complications & Metabolism, received her PhD from UC Riverside. Her lab investigates the role of non-coding RNA and chromatin remodeling in endothelial stress response and their implications in diabetes complications and cancer.   
 
Sangeeta Dhawan, Ph.D. 
Dr. Dhawan, Assistant Professor at the Department of Translational Research & Cellular Therapeutics, received her PhD from Indian Institute of Science. Her laboratory focuses on identifying the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, regeneration, and survival of the insulin producing beta cells, in health and diabetes.      
 
Carlotta Glackin, Ph.D. 
Dr. Glackin, Associate Professor at the Department of Developmental & Stem Cell Biology, received her PhD from University of Southern California. Her laboratory focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional properties of TWIST1 in cancer cells and developing TWIST1 inhibitors. 
 
Ren-Jang Lin, Ph.D. 
Dr. Lin, Professor at the Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, received PhD from Pennsylvania State University. His laboratory focuses on studying the molecular functions of RNA splicing factors with mutations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as designing microRNA-specific CRISPR/Cas9 library.
 
Kevin Morris, Ph.D. 
Dr. Morris, Professor of Center for Gene Therapy, received his PhD from UC Davis. His laboratory focuses on studying the role of noncoding RNAs in the evolution of cellular states as well as utilizing the inherent endogenous noncoding cellular mechanisms to control the expression of genes involved in human diseases. 
 
Edward Newman, Ph.D. 
Dr. Newman, Associate Professor at the Department of Cancer Biology, received his PhD from Yale University.  Dr. Newman is focused on studying the mechanism by which the inhibition of cytosine methylation in reactivating tumor suppressor gene expression and developing novel DNA methyltransferase inhibitors as effective cancer therapies.  
 
Vu Ngo, Ph.D.  
Dr. Ngo, Associate Research Professor, Department of Systems Biology, received his Ph.D. from University of California, San Francisco.  Dr. Ngo is focused on understanding the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of cancer mutations resulting in cancers that are more aggressive and resistant to therapy.
 
Timothy O’Connor, Ph.D. 
Dr. O’Connor, Professor at the Department of Cancer Biology, received his PhD from Purdue University. His laboratory focuses on investigating DNA repair mechanisms in both normal and tumor cells and how those mechanisms can function either for use in therapeutic interventions or to evade treatment. 
 
Arthur Riggs, Ph.D.  
Dr. Riggs, Director of the Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope, received his PhD from California Institute of Technology. Dr. Riggs's laboratory is focused on how gene regulation occurs via chromatin-based mechanisms and how this regulation changes during mammalian development.
 
John Rossi, Ph.D. 
Dr. Rossi, Chair of the Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology and Dean of Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences, received his PhD from University of Connecticut. His laboratory focuses on developing RNA aptamers and cell internalizing delivery vehicle for the treatments of HIV infection and cancers. 
 
Dustin Schones, Ph.D. 
Dr. Schones, Associate Professor at the Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, received his PhD from Stony Brook University NY. His team is using combined computational and experimental approaches to study the interaction of genetic and epigenetic variations in cancer, diabetes and obesity. 
 
Binghui Shen, Ph.D. 
Dr. Shen, Chair of the Department of Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics, received his PhD from Kansas State University. His team focuses on understanding the molecular functions of nucleases in DNA replication and repair, as well as identifying histone modifiers and their contribution to cancer. 
 
Steven Smith, Ph.D. 
Dr. Smith, Professor Emeritus at the Department of Hematologic Malignancies Translational Science, received his PhD from UCLA.  He studies the influence of dynamic DNA structures on genetic and epigenetic DNA damage during carcinogenesis and aging. Current experiments investigate DNA quadruplex linked double-strand breaks, slippage and DNA methylation.
 
Jeremy Stark, Ph.D. 
Dr. Stark, Professor at the Department of Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics, received his PhD from University of Washington. His team seeks to define the factors that limit chromosomal rearrangements during DNA double-stranded break repair to maintain genome stability, and to develop therapeutic targets for tumor radiosensitization.    
 
Zijie (ZJ) Sun, M.D., Ph.D. 
Dr. Sun is a Professor at the Department of Cancer Biology. His research interest is focused on transcriptional control and cell signaling in development and tumorigenesis, especially using a variety of “cutting-edge” experimental approaches to uncover genomic and epigenetic alternations during the course of these biologic events.    
 
Lindsey Treviño, Ph.D.  
Dr. Treviño, Assistant Professor at the Department of Population Sciences, received her PhD from Cornell University.  Dr. Treviño 's research is directed at understanding the molecular basis by which exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals affects the epigenetic machinery leading to a variety of metabolic disorders including cancer, obesity and diabetes.
 
Yanzhong Yang, M.D., Ph.D. 
Dr. Yang, Assistant Professor at the Department of Cancer Genetics & Epigenetics, received his PhD from Fudan University. Research in his laboratory aims to identify altered epigenetic pathways that lead to tumorigenesis and to develop novel strategies to target these pathways for cancer therapy.
 
Hua Yu, Ph.D.  
Dr. Yu, Professor of the Department of Immuno-Oncology, received her PhD from Columbia University. Dr. Yu's research team examines the role of STAT3 in mediating the tumor microenvironment.  The eventual goal is to devise therapies to target STAT3 leading to tumor death.
 
Xiaochun Yu, M.D., Ph.D. 
Dr. Yu, Professor at the Department of Cancer Genetics & Epigenetics, received his PhD from Kurume University. His team uses multidisciplinary approaches to identify novel signal transduction pathways mediated by post-translational modifications in DNA damage response and repair to preserve genome integrity.  
 
John Zaia, M.D. 
Dr. Zaia, Director of Center for Gene Therapy, received his MD from Harvard Medical School. His team collaborates with City of Hope investigators to test various approaches, including genome editing of the CCR5 gene important for HIV infection, in providing resistance to HIV infection and slowing the progression of AIDS.