Hematopoiesis & Hematologic Malignancy

Angelo Cardoso, M.D., Ph.D.
Dr. Cardoso, Research Professor of Center for Gene Therapy, received his MD and PhD from Porto University and University of Paris XI Medical School, respectively.  He studies how oncogenic signals interact with micro-environmental cues in an attempt to develop novel inhibitors targeting high-risk and refractory relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
 
Nadia Carlesso, M.D., Ph.D. 
Dr. Carlesso, Professor at the Department of Hematologic Malignancies Translational Science, received her PhD from U of Genoa & Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is investigating the role of the tumor microenvironment in leukemia progression to identify novel therapeutic approaches to defeat leukemia drug resistance and relapse. 
 
Wing-Chun (John) Chan, M.D.
Dr. Chan, Dr. Norman and Melinda Payson Professor in Hematologic Cancer, received his MD from University of Hong Kong. Dr. Chan's research focuses on using genomics approaches to explore the molecular pathogenesis and classification of lymphoma. He has identified molecular signature to improve diagnosis, outcome prediction & treatment response for lymphoma patients.
 
Jianjun Chen, Ph.D. 
Dr. Chen, Professor at the Department of Systems Biology, received his PhD from Chinese Academy of Sciences. His team focuses on basic and translational research associated with RNA/DNA epigenetics, especially N6 methyl-adenosine (m6A) RNA modification and TET protein mediated DNA methylation, in the development and drug response of cancers. 
 
Wenyong Chen, Ph.D. 
Dr. Chen, Associate Professor at the Department of Cancer Biology, received his PhD from University of Alabama at Birmingham. His laboratory is interested in understanding epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging, leukemia development and drug resistance in leukemia stem cells.
 
Stephen Forman, M.D. 
Dr. Forman, Chair and Professor at The Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received his MD from University of Southern California. Dr. Forman's research is focused on developing genetically engineered CAR T cells to promote adoptive immunotherapy in the treatment of a wide range of cancers.  
 
Nora Heisterkamp, Ph.D. 
Dr. Heisterkamp, Professor at the Department of Systems Biology, received her PhD from University of Rotterdam. Her team focuses on defining the molecular mechanism by which non-leukemia cells stimulate precursor B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell growth and provide chemotherapeutic resistance via direct cell contact. 
 
Ya-Huei Kuo, Ph.D. 
Dr. Kuo, Associate Professor at the Department of Hematologic Malignancies Translational Science, received her PhD from University of Connecticut.  Dr. Kuo's research is directed at understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of acute myeloid leukemia to facilitate improved cancer treatments.
 
Larry W. Kwak, M.D., Ph.D. 
Dr. Kwak, Professor, Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received his MD and PhD from Northwestern University.  Dr. Kwak's laboratory focuses on   studying novel immunotherapies to treat mantle cell lymphoma, a particularly aggressive type of lymphoma with a poor survival record.
 
Ling Li, Ph.D. 
Dr. Li, Assistant Professor at the Department of Hematologic Malignancies Translational Science, received his PhD from Zhejiang University. His laboratory focuses on determining the role of SIRT1 and p53 in regulating leukemia stem cell growth, with the ultimate goal of creating novel therapeutics for leukemia.
 
Guido Marcucci, M.D. 
Dr. Marcucci, Chair and Professor, Department of Hematologic Malignancies Translational Science, received his MD from Catholic University of the Sacred Heart.  Dr. Marcucci is intensely interested in the pathogenesis, the maintenance and treatment of both chronic and acute myelogenous leukemia.
 
Markus Müschen, M.D., Ph.D.  
Dr. Müschen, Professor and Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, received his MD and PhD from the University of Cologne. His research focuses on understanding oncogenic signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML). His team is developing a means to predict AML relapse and identifying therapeutic strategies to overcome such relapse.
 
Christiane Querfeld, M.D., Ph.D.  
Dr. Querfeld, Chief of Division of Dermatology and Assistant Clinical Professor at the Department of Pathology, received her MD and PhD from University of Cologne and University of Heidelberg, respectively. Dr. Querfeld's research focuses on understanding the biology of cutaneous lymphomas and developing therapies for this class of cancer.
 
Steven Rosen, M.D. 
Dr. Rosen, Provost & Professor at the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, received his MD from Northwestern University. His team is developing novel therapies for hematologic malignancy by targeting ATP synthase, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, histone deacetylase and de-ubiquinase. 
 
Leo Wang, M.D., Ph.D. 
Dr. Wang, Assistant Professor at the Department of Immuno-Oncology, received his MD and PhD from the University of Chicago.  Dr. Wang's lab uses molecular and cellular techniques to identify non-genetic determinants leading to functional differences in blood cells at different stages of development.
 
Lili Wang, M.D., Ph.D.
Dr. Wang, Associate Professor at the Department of Systems Biology, received her MD from China Medical University and her PhD from Tokai University.  Dr. Wang's research involves understanding how somatic mutations contribute to the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
 
Sophia Wang, Ph.D. 
Dr. Wang, Professor at the Department of Computation and Quantitative Medicine, received her PhD from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research is focused on the etiology of hematopoietic malignancies and the role that immune genes, which play a role in inflammation, impact lymphoma etiology and survival.
 
Defu Zeng, M.D. 
Dr. Zeng, Professor of Diabetes Immunology, received his PhD from Fujian Medical University. His laboratory focuses on understanding the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease, which is a major obstacle in allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation for the treatment of hematological malignancies.