National Cancer Institute CURE Program

As an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope is proud to be part of the Continuing Umbrella of Research Experience (CURE) Program, which is designed to engage the scientific curiosity of promising young high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented populations who are interested in cancer research as a career. Students participating in the CURE program receive a $4,800 stipend.
 
Underrepresented populations include African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, and Pacific Islander.  CURE students work side by side with City of Hope scientists on current, challenging research projects. The CURE Program lasts 12 weeks.
 
Apply for the 2017 CURE program
 
To apply for the CURE program, fill out the online Summer Student application and check “CURE Program applicant” to indicate your desire to be considered for the CURE program as well.
 
Summer Student Academy CURE program
Allissa Cardenas, a junior at the University of Southern California, was mentored by Dr. Kimlin Ashing-Giwa in the Department of Population Sciences. Her project was titled “Exploring Sexual Practice Paradox In Cervical Cancer Screening: A City of Hope Catchment  Area Study.”
 
Stephanie Leyva, a junior at Yale University, was mentored by Dr. David Ann in the Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism.  Her project was titled “Roles of UBA6-AS1 and SERPINA1 in Cell Migration in Response to Glucose depletion in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 Cells.”
 
Skylar Hess, a freshman at Brown University, was mentored by Dr. Tijana Talisman in the Department of Molecular Medicine. Her project was titled “Molecular Mechanisms of Alcohol Associated Breast Cancer.”
 
Uwaila Omokaro, a junior at Pittsburg High School, was mentored by Dr. Kimlin Ashing-Giwa in the Department of Population Sciences. Her project was titled “Study of the Relationship Between Breast Imaging Kinetics and Circulating Cell-free DNA.”
 
Kristalee Lio, a junior at Chapman University, was mentored by Dr. Andrei Rodin in the Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism. Her project was titled “Computational Analysis of TCR Repertoire in Patients with Breast Cancer.”
 
Benjamin Nittayo, a senior at California State University, Los Angeles, was mentored by Dr. Javier Ogembo in the Department of Experimental Therapeutics. His project was titled “A Virus-like Particle Based Vaccine Against Epstein-Barr virus.”
 
Jennifer Gutierrez, a senior at Mount Saint Mary’s University, was mentored by Dr. Russell Rockne in the Department of Mathematical Oncology. Her project was titled “Aggregation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) in Glioblastoma.”
 
Caroline Smith, a junior at Chadwick School, was mentored by Dr. John Rossi in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. Her project was titled “Delivery of MicroRNA 142 via B-Cell-Activating Factor Receptor.”
 
Jerik Pineda, a senior at California State University, Long Beach, was mentored by Dr. Robert Hickey in the Department of Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics. His project was titled “A Possible Interaction between Annexin A2 and PCNA May Mediate Cell Surface PCNA Translocation following IFN-y stimulation.”
 
Ronald Clinton, a junior at Mira Costa High School, was mentored by Dr. Tijana Talisman in the Department of Molecular Medicine. His project was titled “Utilizing Super-Resolution Microscopy to Obtain Molecular Distribution of Her2 in Breast Cancer.”
 
Jan Pineda, a junior at the University of California, Santa Barbara, was mentored by Dr. Lusine Tumyan in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology . Her project was titled “A Study of the Relationship Between Breast Imaging Kinetics and Circulating Cell-free DNA.”
 
Keenan Correa, a freshman at University of California, San Diego, was mentored by Dr. Yuman Fong in the Department of Surgical Oncology. His project was titled “Engineering Orthopoxvirus as a Treatment for Gastric Cancer.”
 
Adia Hong, a sophomore at Arroyo High School, was mentored by Dr. Jack Shively in the Department of Molecular Immunology. Her project was titled “Cloning, Expression and Purification of CEACAM-short, long form, Annexin II, and S100A10 for NMR Interaction and Structure Study.”