National Cancer Institute CURE Program

As an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope is proud to be part of the Continuing Umbrella of Research Experience (CURE) Program, which is designed to engage the scientific curiosity of promising young high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented populations who are interested in cancer research as a career. Students participating in the CURE program receive a $4,800 stipend.
 
Underrepresented populations include African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, and Pacific Islander.  CURE students work side by side with City of Hope scientists on current, challenging research projects. The CURE Program lasts 12 weeks.
 
Apply for the 2018 CURE program
 
To apply for the CURE program, fill out the online Summer Student application and check “CURE Program applicant” to indicate your desire to be considered for the CURE program as well.
 
2017 CURE program participants

Colette Araque, a junior at El Segundo High School, was mentored by Dr. Yilun Liu in the Department of Cancer Biology. Her project was titled "Interaction between CK84 and RECQ4 of the RECQ4-MCM Helicase Complex.”
 
Jacqueline Baca-Sigala, a junior at Bishop Alemany High School, was mentored by Dr. Linda Malkas in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. Her project was titled “A Peptide Derived from PCNA May Be Cytotoxic to Breast Cancer through Interaction with 40S Ribosomal Protein S3.”
 
Leslie Cisneros, a freshman at Citrus College, was mentored by Dr. Carlotta Glackin in the Department of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology. Her project was titled “In Vivo Evaluation of siTWIST Therapies Using Chicken Embryo Tumor Models.”
 
Ronald Clinton, a freshman at Stanford University, was mentored by Dr. Tijana Talisman in the Department of Molecular Medicine. His project was titled “Detecting Protein Networks Using Super-Resolution Microscopy.”
 
Jaime Cordova, a senior at Cal State University, Long Beach, was mentored by Dr. Dustin Schones in the Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism. His project was titled “Type 2 Diabetes and PI3K/Akt/mTOR: A Potential Role in Triple Negative Breast Cancer.”
 
Keenan Correa, a sophomore at University of California, San Diego, was mentored by Dr. Yuman Fong in the Department of Surgery. His project was titled “Isolating Liver Stem Cells for AAV Gene Therapy.”
 
Cristian Hernandez, a sophomore at Yale University, was mentored by Dr. Rahul Jandial in the Department of Neurosurgery. His project was titled “Function of Glial Cells on Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis.”
 
Skylar Hess, a junior at Brown University, was mentored by Dr. Tijana Talisman in the Department of Molecular Medicine. Her project was titled “Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptors in Neuroblastoma.”
 
Sophia Manjarrez, a junior at La Habra High School, was mentored by Dr. Thomas Slavin in the Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics. Her project was titled “The Spectrum of Germline Variants in Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer.”
 
Itzel Melgoza, a junior at Woodrow Wilson High School, was mentored by Dr. Tim O’Connor in the Department of Cancer Biology. Her project was titled “Targeting Human Uracil-DNA Glycosylase.”
 
Daisy Nunez, a freshman at the University of Chicago, was mentored by Dr. Yilun Liu in the Department of Cancer Biology. Her project was titled “Inhibiting Topoisomerase IK391 SUMOylation as a Potential New Cancer Therapeutic Strategy.”
 
Jan Pineda, a senior at University of California, Santa Barbara, was mentored by Dr. Yuan Chen in the Department of Molecular Medicine. Her project was titled “Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Ubiquitin-Like Post-Translational Modifications.”
 
Jasmine Robinson, a senior at Cornell University, was mentored by Dr. Victoria Seewaldt in the Department of Population Sciences. Her project was titled “Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Hormone Receptor Negative Breast Cancer Prevention.”
 
Jocelyn Rodriguez, a senior at University of California, Riverside, was mentored by Dr. Binghui Shen in the Department of Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics. Her project was titled “Establishment of Centromeric Specific DNA Combing Assay to Study DNA2’s Role in Centromeric DNA Replication.”
 
Lila Vasquez, a senior at University of California, Los Angeles, was mentored by Dr. Markus Muschen in the Department of Systems Biology. Her project was titled “The Potential Function of Mucin 4 in Ph+ pre-B ALL.”
 
George Wang, a freshman at University of California, Berkeley, was mentored by Dr. Tim O’Connor in the Department of Cancer Biology. His project was titled “Targeting Multiple DNA Repair Pathways Protecting Cells Against Alkylating Agent Damage.”
 
Paulino Yanez, freshman at Harvard University, was mentored by Dr. Binghui Shen in the Department of Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics. His project was titled “The Role of EXO-5 in DNA Repair Pathway of Prostate Cancer."