Nursing researchers lead the way on caring for cancer survivors

October 17, 2011 | by City of Hope Staff

For cancer patients who are finishing treatment, proper care means having a plan for regular follow-ups and taking steps for cancer prevention and early detection in the coming months and years. But too few patients get this kind of care.

Marcia Grant, R.N., D.N.Sc., director and professor of the Division of Nursing Research and Education Marcia Grant, R.N., D.N.Sc., director and professor of the Division of Nursing Research and Education(photo by Walter Urie)

Now the National Cancer Institute  has granted City of Hope and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center more than $1.4 million to train nurses in how to care for cancer survivors. Two hundred nurses from across the country will get intensive training through workshops so they can help patients and their families achieve the best possible quality of life after cancer treatment. They’ll focus on how to prevent new cancers through lifestyle choices, deciding when patients should have tests and follow-ups and how best to communicate with patients.

Nearly 12 million people in the U.S. are now living with or beyond cancer, and nursing researchers know that those numbers will grow. They also know they’ll be on the front lines of this new model of survivorship care. To create their training, they’ve used the elements of an influential Institute of Medicine report that called for better care for cancer survivors.

If you’re in treatment or are a cancer survivor, our Restore site has a practical list of information you need to get the best care for the years to come. The Institute of Medicine also has a handy fact sheet online that can help you get the facts you need from your health-care team.

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