Skin Cancer and Pigmented Lesion Screening Clinic

There is no place in the world right now that has the kind of technology that we have for patients.” - Christiane Querfeld, M.D., Ph.D. Chief, Division of Dermatology

If you have been diagnosed with skin cancer, or if you may be at high risk of developing it, the specialists at City of Hope will provide you with the screening, information and expertise you need.

Our multidisciplinary team of dermatologists, oncologists, surgeons and health professionals will guide you and your loved ones through each step of the journey, from diagnosis to treatment to recovery and beyond.

City of Hope is a nationally recognized leader in the research and treatment of melanoma. We are one of the few facilities designated a comprehensive cancer center by the National Cancer Institute.

For more than a decade, U.S. News & World Report has named City of Hope one of the top cancer hospitals in America. We bring together a broad array of expertise from multiple specialties and are unmatched in our rapid “bench-to-bedside” record of translating leading-edge research into real-world treatments. At City of Hope we answer your questions, address your concerns and design a personalized treatment plan to give you the best possible outcome. We treat the whole person, body and soul.

If you have a suspicious mole, contact your primary care doctor, a dermatologist or City of Hope’s Skin Cancer and Pigmented Lesion Screening Clinic for further evaluation.
Clinic hours: Mondays, 1 to 5 p.m.

Third floor, Clinic 3B Services: Skin exam, biopsies or well equiped treatment room for cryotherapy and small excisions if indicated.

Call 800-934-5555 or ask your doctor for a referral to the Skin Cancer and Pigmented Lesion Screening Clinic.

Did you know?

  • Skin cancer affects people of all colors and races.
  • One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.
  • Transplant patients have 100 times greater risk of developing skin cancers.
  • One ounce of sunscreen (one shot glass full) is considered the amount needed to cover the sun-exposed areas of the body.


Learn more about skin cancer