In the News

 
Christiane Querfeld, M.D., Ph.D.

City of Hope recently received $7.5 million in grant awards to study a rare type of blood cancer that affects the skin: cutaneous T cell lymphoma.


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City of Hope recently received $7.5 million in grant awards to study a rare type of blood cancer that affects the skin: cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL).

Larry Kwak

City of Hope has earned its third Lymphoma Specialized Programs of Research Excellence grant from the National Cancer Institute, which provides $12.5 million for research.


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An international leader in finding new, innovative treatments for lymphoma patients, City of Hope announced today that it has received its third lymphoma Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), one of four current NCI-supported lymphoma SPOREs. The grant covers a five-year period and totals $12.5 million.

Lucys Story | City of Hope

After many complications, City of Hope lymphoma patient Lucy found renewed hope after an immunotherapy clinical trial.


Cheryl Wiers CAR T | City of Hope

Cheryl Wiers knew her cancer diagnosis happened for a reason, and for her, that reason could be her participation in a clinical trial using what is arguably the most promising cancer treatment — CAR T cell therapy.


Larry Kwak

Larry Kwak, M.D., Ph.D., received a grant to support his work with mantle cell lymphoma from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the world’s largest voluntary health organization dedicated to fighting blood cancer.


Budde-Elizabeth

New blood cancer breakthroughs – including several involving CAR T cell therapy – were announced by City of Hope physicians at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting in Atlanta.


CAR T Illuminated

City of Hope will be the one of the first authorized centers in the nation to provide axicabtagene ciloleucel, which the U.S. FDA announced today is the first approved CAR T therapy for adult patients who have not responded to or who have relapsed after at least two other kinds of treatment.


robert w chen md 256x256

Hodgkin lymphoma is typically considered to be one of the most curable forms of cancer, but some with the disease relapse. For patients like this, a fully human monoclonal antibody called avelumab has shown promising results in a phase 1 clinical trial for safety and efficacy.