A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Urologic Cancers

Urology and Urologic Cancers
At City of Hope, our physicians are leading experts in treating patients with all types of urologic cancers. Just as no two patients are alike, cancer requires a unique treatment plan tailored to each individual to attain the best possible outcomes.
 
As one of a select number of institutions to attain the elite designation of  Comprehensive Cancer Center from the National Cancer Institute, City of Hope is acknowledged as a leader in cancer research and treatment.  Patients at City of Hope have access to:
 
  • Researchers and physicians who are nationally recognized experts in developing novel methods for preventing, detecting and treating urologic cancers
  • A multidisciplinary team of specialists in medical oncology, surgery and recovery.
  • Innovative clinical trials on the latest promising treatments, many unavailable anywhere but City of Hope
 
We are actively developing tomorrow’s treatment protocols today for bladder, kidney, prostate and testicular cancers. City of Hope was one of the first cancer centers in the United States to perform robotic-assisted prostatectomy using the  da Vinci® surgical system , and our surgeons have performed thousands of robotic urologic procedures.  The most significant benefits to patients are quicker recovery times and decreased blood loss compared to patients undergoing conventional “open incision” procedures.
 
City of Hope is home to California's largest prostate cancer program (according to data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, OSHPD) and maintains one of the country’s largest databases of  prostate cancer outcomes . City of Hope also maintains a large database of bladder cancer outcomes to aid in developing new treatment protocols. We have also developed more precise tools to monitor cancer progression in men who have opted for active surveillance for prostate cancer. 
 
Other leading-edge treatments offered here include robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In fact, we have performed the largest number of robotic-assisted radical cystectomy procedures worldwide. In addition, we perform a variety of procedures to treat kidney cancer/renal masses, including radical nephrectomy, nephron-sparing surgery (open, laparoscopic, or robotic-assisted), cryoablation and radio-frequency ablation (performed percutaneously or laparoscopically).
 
The staff of the Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology, headed by  Timothy G. Wilson, M.D., Pauline and Martin Collins Family Chair in Urology, is recognized for its extensive expertise in minimally invasive surgery. We perform highly complex surgeries, such as retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for the treatment of testicular cancer. Because City of Hope offers the expertise of all cancer-related specialists in one location, patients receive greater continuity of care and more coordinated treatment planning.  The Division of Urology also sees many patients who have urologic problems as a result of treatment of non-urologic cancers.

Our research is focused on the early diagnosis and prevention of prostate cancer, intraoperative imaging, identification of high-risk prostate cancer patients and quality-of-life issues involving prostate cancer treatment. At City of Hope, we are evaluating outcomes and patterns of cancer care for both prostate and bladder cancer and better defining the benefits of robotic-assisted surgery.
 

Urologic Cancers Team

Support This Program

It takes the help of a lot of caring people to make hope a reality for our patients. City of Hope was founded by individuals' philanthropic efforts 100 years ago. Their efforts − and those of our supporters today − have built the foundation for the care we provide and the research we conduct. It enables us to strive for new breakthroughs and better therapies − helping more people enjoy longer, better lives.

For more information on supporting this specific program, please contact us below.

Rick Leonard
Associate Vice President
Direct: 213-241-7218
Email: rleonard@coh.org

 
 
Meet our doctors: Urologist Jonathan Yamzon on curingtesticular cancer

Meet our doctors: Urologist Jonathan Yamzon on curing testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men 15 to 34 years old. Yet it accounts for only 1 percent of all cancers in men in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, ...

May 31, 2014

 
Urologic cancers: Dispatches from research’s frontlines

Urologic cancers: Dispatches from research’s front lines

Urologic cancers, including prostate cancer, kidney cancer and bladder cancer, are diagnosed in more than 381,000 Americans each year, and almost 60,000 people die from the diseases. City of Hope’s ph...

March 28, 2014

 
Meet our doctors: Surgeon Jennifer Linehan on prostatecancer

Meet our doctors: Surgeon Jennifer Linehan on prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer affecting men, with one in six American men receiving the diagnosis in their lifetime. In most cases, the disease grows slowly and causes no p...

December 7, 2013

 
City of Hope surgeon Laura Crocitto, M.D., talks aboutvitamin E and prostate cancer

City of Hope surgeon Laura Crocitto, M.D., talks about vitamin E and prostate cancer

You may have heard talk on the news about a link between vitamins and prostate cancer. A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association  reveals that men should be more aware of the...

October 17, 2011

 
Why should men care about prostate cancer?

Why should men care about prostate cancer?

Timothy Wilson, M.D., Director, Prostate Cancer Program and Chief of the Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology Cancers at City of Hope, discusses why men should pay attention to prostate canc...

October 10, 2011

 
Urologic Cancers - Advances in Research and Treatments
 
Timothy Wilson, M.D.: Pauline & Martin Collins Family Chair in Urology, talks about City of Hope advances in research and treatments of urologic cancers.
 
For more information on prostate cancer: Watch the City of Hope prostate cancer YouTube playlist.
Urology and Urologic Oncology Research

City of Hopes's Division of Urology strives to improve quality of care through innovative research that helps expand our understanding of urologic cancers. This brochure provides the key areas of research and studies our division is focusing on.
 
 
The Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology at City of Hope offers a Fellowship in Urologic Oncology with special emphasis on minimally invasive and robotic techniques.
Clinical Trials
Our aggressive pursuit to discover better ways to help patients now – not years from now – places us among the leaders worldwide in the administration of clinical trials.
 
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