A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Comprehensive Cancer Center

City of Hope has a proud history of excellence in biomedical research, patient-centered medical care, and community outreach.
 
In recognition of our broad-based innovations in cancer research and treatment, our continuing commitment to compassionate patient care, and our initiatives in patient and community education, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has designated City of Hope a Comprehensive Cancer Center — the highest level of recognition bestowed by the NCI. City of Hope is one of just a handful of elite institutions nationwide to receive this prestigious honor.
 
As a division of the National Institutes of Health, the NCI is the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training. The NCI's Cancer Center program acknowledges institutions for their scientific excellence, as well as their ability to bring diverse research approaches to the problem of cancer. The "Comprehensive Cancer Center" designation indicates that City of Hope has undergone a rigorous review process and has met or exceeded NCI standards in these areas.
 

City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and resources are dedicated to developing innovative new disease-fighting strategies in the battle against cancer. Through these programs, and through the mission and vision of City of Hope physicians and scientists, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center will continue to make a difference in the lives of current and potential cancer patients and their loved ones—around the world today and in the future.
 
 
All of these activities are made possible by a forward-thinking infrastructure supporting basic and translational research in biological and small molecule cancer therapeutics.
 

Cancer Center Leadership

Cancer Center Program Co-leaders

About Our Cancer Center Research Programs

City of Hope provides a multidisciplinary, interactive environment where basic, clinical and translational, and prevention and control scientists collaborate closely. This stimulating intellectual environment contributes to the productive translational research under way within the Comprehensive Cancer Center. Our research initiatives are divided into the following research programs:
 
Basic Science Research Program

The Comprehensive Cancer Center provides both the infrastructure and the environment for outstanding basic science research. ("Basic science" refers to research conducted in a laboratory setting.) In turn, this research contributes to our understanding of the underlying genetic, molecular and biological bases of cancer. The basic science research program at City of Hope is called Molecular Oncology (MONC).
 
Clinical and Translational Research Programs

The Comprehensive Cancer Center's clinical and translational research programs focus on the translation of novel laboratory observations into the treatment of patients (and their families) and, ultimately, throughout the world. The number of the Center's novel (Phases I and I/II) clinical trials increases yearly. The clinical and translational science research programs are:
 
 
Prevention and Control Program
 
Cancer prevention and control research at the Comprehensive Cancer Center is conducted within a program on Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS). The members of this research program cover an extensive spectrum of disciplines, which is further broadened by additional collaborations with physician investigators. Such a confederation of expertise, working within a collaborative environment, maximizes productive interaction. The program focuses on four important areas of concentration:
 
  • Host and environmental determinants of cancer
  • Health-related outcomes and quality of life after cancer
  • Interventional studies to reduce cancer-related morbidity
  • Educational initiatives
 
Our five research programs, described above, represent a continuum, as shown in the figure below. Basic and translational studies can originate in either the basic science program,MO or the DCT Program. These studies can then link to phase I and II clinical protocols in all three clinical programs—DCT, CI and HM. They can also integrate into follow-up studies in survivorship and symptom management in the CCPS Program. On this continuum, CI spans both translational and clinical research, whereas HM is predominantly (but not exclusively) clinical. Frequent interaction between the principal investigators of each program ensures maximum benefit from shared insights. All these activities are made possible by City of Hope’s infrastructure, which supports basic and translational research in biological and in small molecule approaches to cancer.

The arrow in the figure below represents our realization that, even as activities move to the right toward clinical realization, there is a strong requirement to recycle back to developmental activities in response to the knowledge we gain in early clinical application. Our scientists are already doing this routinely, aided by our flexible and responsive infrastructure. The CCPS Program also contributes to the cycle by providing downstream information on effects of therapy and also potential prevention and therapeutic targets — findings arising out of survivorship and molecular epidemiological work of CCPS. These findings may then be explored by other programs in the continuum.
 
 
 

Community Outreach

As a Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope plays an important role in the community. We continually use the knowledge gained from our ongoing research to influence the standards of prevention and care, and to educate physicians, caregivers, and patients alike.
 
 

Why Choose a Comprehensive Cancer Center?

Only a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center such as City of Hope offers a full complement of services designed to address all aspects of cancer, from understanding its origins, to developing new therapies and testing them in patient clinical trials, to delivering superior patient care and providing support and education to patients, their families and the public.
 
City of Hope is one of a select few cancer centers nationwide to have received this prestigious honor. NCI-funded cancer centers must go through a rigorous review process every five years, in which they are evaluated and ranked. Only those conducting the most promising cancer research are awarded Comprehensive Cancer Center status. It is an important credential to consider when choosing a cancer treatment facility.
 
As a patient, a diagnosis of cancer brings with it many questions and concerns. Choosing a Comprehensive Cancer Center such as City of Hope is an empowering step, equipping you with the best possible resources to fight the disease.
 
Attributes of a Comprehensive Cancer Center
To achieve the Comprehensive Cancer Center designation, organizations must support a broad range of research programs and approach the problem of cancer in many different ways. Comprehensive Cancer Centers like City of Hope must have strong programs in all of the following areas:
 
Comprehensive Cancer Centers also play important roles in their communities and regions, and influence the standards of prevention and care.
 
National Comprehensive Cancer Network Founding Member
Of the relatively few NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, only an elite 21 comprise the National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( NCCN ), an alliance of the nation's leading Comprehensive Cancer Centers that defines and sets standards for cancer care. City of Hope is proud to be a founding member of the NCCN. NCCN member institutions are recognized for their world-renowned experts and for dealing with particularly complex, rare and aggressive forms of cancer. As an NCCN member institution, City of Hope plays a critical role in advancing state-of-the-art cancer treatment through education, research, and patient care. Learn more about the NCCN at www.nccn.org.
 

Comprehensive Cancer Center

Comprehensive Cancer Center

City of Hope has a proud history of excellence in biomedical research, patient-centered medical care, and community outreach.
 
In recognition of our broad-based innovations in cancer research and treatment, our continuing commitment to compassionate patient care, and our initiatives in patient and community education, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has designated City of Hope a Comprehensive Cancer Center — the highest level of recognition bestowed by the NCI. City of Hope is one of just a handful of elite institutions nationwide to receive this prestigious honor.
 
As a division of the National Institutes of Health, the NCI is the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training. The NCI's Cancer Center program acknowledges institutions for their scientific excellence, as well as their ability to bring diverse research approaches to the problem of cancer. The "Comprehensive Cancer Center" designation indicates that City of Hope has undergone a rigorous review process and has met or exceeded NCI standards in these areas.
 

City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and resources are dedicated to developing innovative new disease-fighting strategies in the battle against cancer. Through these programs, and through the mission and vision of City of Hope physicians and scientists, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center will continue to make a difference in the lives of current and potential cancer patients and their loved ones—around the world today and in the future.
 
 
All of these activities are made possible by a forward-thinking infrastructure supporting basic and translational research in biological and small molecule cancer therapeutics.
 

Cancer Center Leadership

Cancer Center Leadership

Cancer Center Program Co-leaders

Cancer Center Program Co-leaders

Cancer Center Research Programs

About Our Cancer Center Research Programs

City of Hope provides a multidisciplinary, interactive environment where basic, clinical and translational, and prevention and control scientists collaborate closely. This stimulating intellectual environment contributes to the productive translational research under way within the Comprehensive Cancer Center. Our research initiatives are divided into the following research programs:
 
Basic Science Research Program

The Comprehensive Cancer Center provides both the infrastructure and the environment for outstanding basic science research. ("Basic science" refers to research conducted in a laboratory setting.) In turn, this research contributes to our understanding of the underlying genetic, molecular and biological bases of cancer. The basic science research program at City of Hope is called Molecular Oncology (MONC).
 
Clinical and Translational Research Programs

The Comprehensive Cancer Center's clinical and translational research programs focus on the translation of novel laboratory observations into the treatment of patients (and their families) and, ultimately, throughout the world. The number of the Center's novel (Phases I and I/II) clinical trials increases yearly. The clinical and translational science research programs are:
 
 
Prevention and Control Program
 
Cancer prevention and control research at the Comprehensive Cancer Center is conducted within a program on Cancer Control and Population Sciences (CCPS). The members of this research program cover an extensive spectrum of disciplines, which is further broadened by additional collaborations with physician investigators. Such a confederation of expertise, working within a collaborative environment, maximizes productive interaction. The program focuses on four important areas of concentration:
 
  • Host and environmental determinants of cancer
  • Health-related outcomes and quality of life after cancer
  • Interventional studies to reduce cancer-related morbidity
  • Educational initiatives
 
Our five research programs, described above, represent a continuum, as shown in the figure below. Basic and translational studies can originate in either the basic science program,MO or the DCT Program. These studies can then link to phase I and II clinical protocols in all three clinical programs—DCT, CI and HM. They can also integrate into follow-up studies in survivorship and symptom management in the CCPS Program. On this continuum, CI spans both translational and clinical research, whereas HM is predominantly (but not exclusively) clinical. Frequent interaction between the principal investigators of each program ensures maximum benefit from shared insights. All these activities are made possible by City of Hope’s infrastructure, which supports basic and translational research in biological and in small molecule approaches to cancer.

The arrow in the figure below represents our realization that, even as activities move to the right toward clinical realization, there is a strong requirement to recycle back to developmental activities in response to the knowledge we gain in early clinical application. Our scientists are already doing this routinely, aided by our flexible and responsive infrastructure. The CCPS Program also contributes to the cycle by providing downstream information on effects of therapy and also potential prevention and therapeutic targets — findings arising out of survivorship and molecular epidemiological work of CCPS. These findings may then be explored by other programs in the continuum.
 
 
 

Community Outreach

Community Outreach

As a Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope plays an important role in the community. We continually use the knowledge gained from our ongoing research to influence the standards of prevention and care, and to educate physicians, caregivers, and patients alike.
 
 

Why Choose A Comprehensive Cancer Center?

Why Choose a Comprehensive Cancer Center?

Only a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center such as City of Hope offers a full complement of services designed to address all aspects of cancer, from understanding its origins, to developing new therapies and testing them in patient clinical trials, to delivering superior patient care and providing support and education to patients, their families and the public.
 
City of Hope is one of a select few cancer centers nationwide to have received this prestigious honor. NCI-funded cancer centers must go through a rigorous review process every five years, in which they are evaluated and ranked. Only those conducting the most promising cancer research are awarded Comprehensive Cancer Center status. It is an important credential to consider when choosing a cancer treatment facility.
 
As a patient, a diagnosis of cancer brings with it many questions and concerns. Choosing a Comprehensive Cancer Center such as City of Hope is an empowering step, equipping you with the best possible resources to fight the disease.
 
Attributes of a Comprehensive Cancer Center
To achieve the Comprehensive Cancer Center designation, organizations must support a broad range of research programs and approach the problem of cancer in many different ways. Comprehensive Cancer Centers like City of Hope must have strong programs in all of the following areas:
 
Comprehensive Cancer Centers also play important roles in their communities and regions, and influence the standards of prevention and care.
 
National Comprehensive Cancer Network Founding Member
Of the relatively few NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, only an elite 21 comprise the National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( NCCN ), an alliance of the nation's leading Comprehensive Cancer Centers that defines and sets standards for cancer care. City of Hope is proud to be a founding member of the NCCN. NCCN member institutions are recognized for their world-renowned experts and for dealing with particularly complex, rare and aggressive forms of cancer. As an NCCN member institution, City of Hope plays a critical role in advancing state-of-the-art cancer treatment through education, research, and patient care. Learn more about the NCCN at www.nccn.org.
 
Research Shared Services

City of Hope embodies the spirit of scientific collaboration by sharing services and core facilities with colleagues here and around the world.
 

Clinical Trials
Our aggressive pursuit to discover better ways to help patients now – not years from now – places us among the leaders worldwide in the administration of clinical trials.
 
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
Discover the wide range of progressive cancer treatment options at City of Hope designed to meet the individual needs of each patient. Here, medical research and clinical care are integrated, speeding the application of scientific discoveries toward better, more effective patient cancer treatments.
City of Hope Breakthroughs
Get the latest in City of Hope's research, treatment and news you can use on our blog, Breakthroughs.
 
 
When you support City of Hope, you help us shorten the time it takes to get from bold, innovative ideas to powerful new medical treatments. Make a gift online now.


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Few clinical cancer trials include older adults – and yet, more than 60 percent of cancer cases in the United States occur in people age 65 and older. The result is a dearth of knowledge on how to treat the very population most likely to be diagnosed with cancer. Now, the American Society of Clinical […]
  • Scientists at City of Hope and UCLA have become the first to inhibit the expression of a protein, called TWIST that promotes tumor invasion and metastasis when activated by cancer cells. As such, they’ve taken the first step in developing a potential new therapy for some of the deadliest cancers, including ovar...
  • Upon completing her final round of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer earlier this month, Maria Velazquez-McIntyre, a 51-year-old Antelope Valley resident, celebrated the milestone by giving other patients a symbol of hope – a Survivor Bell. The bell may look ordinary, but for cancer patients undergoing chemothera...
  • Many Americans understand that obesity is tied to heart disease and diabetes but, according to a new survey, too few – only 7 percent – know that obesity increases the risk of cancer. Specific biological characteristics can increase cancer risk in obese people, and multiple studies have shown correlations betwe...
  • As breast cancer survivors know, the disease’s impact lingers in ways both big and small long after treatment has ended. A new study suggests that weight gain – and a possible corresponding increase in heart disease and diabetes risk – may be part of that impact. In the first study to evaluate weight chan...
  • Becoming what’s known as an independent scientific researcher is no small task, especially when working to translate research into meaningful health outcomes. Yet that independent status is vital, enabling researchers to lead studies and avenues of inquiry that they believe to be promising. Clinicians, especial...
  • 720 days. That’s how long Alex Tung, 38, had to give up surfing after being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. For most people, even some surfers, such a hiatus wouldn’t be a big deal, but for Tung, surfing has been everything. The Southern California resident began surfing when he was in elemen...
  • There are few among us who have not experienced loss of a friend or loved one, often without warning, or like those of us who care for people with cancer, after a lingering illness. It is a time when emotions run high and deep, and as time passes from the moment of loss, we often […]
  • For the past four years, neurosurgeon and scientist Rahul Jandial, M.D., Ph.D., has been studying how breast cancer cells spread, or metastasize, to the brain, where they become life-threatening tumors. Known as secondary brain tumors, these cancers have become increasingly common as treatment advances have ena...
  • Cutaneous T cell lymphomas are types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arise when infection-fighting white blood cells in the lymphatic system – called lymphocytes – become malignant and affect the skin. A primary symptom is a rash that arises initially in areas of the skin that are not normally exposed to sunlight....
  • There’s science camp, and then there’s “mystery” science camp. City of Hope’s new science camp for middle school students is of the especially engaging latter variety. From Monday, July 13, to Friday, July 17, rising middle-school students from across the San Gabriel Valley were presented with a “patient” with ...
  • Women diagnosed with breast cancer quickly learn their tumor’s type, meaning the characteristics that fuel its growth. That label guides the treatment of their disease, as well as their prognosis when it comes to treatment effectiveness. Sometimes, however, doctors can’t accurately predict treatment effectivene...
  • In years past, Bladder Cancer Awareness Month has been a sobering reminder of a disease with few treatment options. For patients with metastatic disease (disease that has spread from the bladder to distant organs), average survival is typically just over one year. Fortunately, things are changing. Academic inst...
  • Tina Wang was diagnosed with Stage 4 diffuse large b cell lymphoma at age 22. She first sought treatment at her local hospital, undergoing two cycles of treatment. When the treatment failed to eradicate her cancer, she came to City of Hope. Here, Wang underwent an autologous stem cell transplant and participate...
  • When Gilbert Fresquez, 72, lost an excessive amount of weight in late 2012, he didn’t think much of it. He assumed it was a side effect from a recent surgery to remove a carcinoid tumor in his small intestine. It wasn’t until a couple of years later during a routine doctor’s visit that the retired […]