A National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Make an appointment: 800-826-HOPE
Clinical Cancer Genetics Bookmark and Share

Clinical Cancer Genetics

 
 
 Mission Statement:
 The City of Hope Division of
 Clinical Cancer Genetics is
 committed to being a national
 leader in the advancement
 of cancer genetics, screening
 and prevention, through
 innovative patient care,
 research and education.
 
 
In light of a growing body of research confirming that many common cancers, including breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer, are hereditary, the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG) Cancer Screening & Prevention Program helps people understand their personal cancer risk profiles, offering a comprehensive cancer risk assessment that takes into account family history and genetics, along with environmental and lifestyle factors. With this information, people can take proactive steps to “outsmart cancer.”
 
 
 
 
The division’s Cancer Genetics Education Program (CGEP) offers courses and professional development tools designed to further health care professionals’ understanding of cancer genetics.
 
 

Major initiatives include:

The Intensive Course (IC) promotes community-based, practitioner-level competence in the selection, application and interpretation of genetic testing in order to provide these critical services in underserved areas.
 
 
 
The Clinical Cancer Genetics Community of Practice (CCGCoP) is a network of clinicians who have graduated from the IC and/or the Cancer Genetics Career Development Program (CGCDP), along with members of the CCGCRN. Those who are part of this unique community have access to collaborators and professional support from other community members, and to enhanced continuing professional development activities offered by CCG.
 
 
 
In the Cancer Genetics Career Development Program, outstanding post-graduate research scientists receive training with a focus on cutting edge genetic and genomic technology. Graduates of this program continue their work in cancer genetics with the goal of reducing the burden of cancer among those at highest risk.
 
 
 
Clinical cancer genetics research at City of Hope investigates multiple approaches that utilize the latest findings in cancer genetics in order to improve the prevention, treatment, and support of those with hereditary cancers.
 
 
 
Major initiatives include:
 
The CCG molecular genetics research laboratory uses a multitude of research tests such as MLPA, long range PCR and next generation sequencing as well as a variety of state of the art equipment to prescreen high risk patients for mutations in cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2 and RAD51. Specific equipment available in the laboratory include:  -Sequenom MassArray Analyzer (MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry) -Sequenom MassArray Robotic Nanodispenser -Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine -Ion One Touch -Nanodrop 2000c spectrophotometer -Qubit 2.0 Fluorometer -ABI 3130xl Genetic Analyzer -Veriti 96 well thermocyclers -Gene Amp 9700 PCR systems
 
 
 
 
An essential but often unmet aspect of providing quality care to persons affected by cancer or those at hereditary cancer risk is addressing their psychosocial needs. As such, understanding and minimizing the negative impact of hereditary cancer risk on persons' lives is the focus of the CCG Clinical and Behavioral Research program. The program studies health-related behaviors, quality of life (including emotional, psychological and basic daily living needs), and ethical, legal, and social issues, by going directly to the source--our patients and their family members.
 
 
 
 
An integral component of the research program is the Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN), a prospective research registry protocol initiated at City of Hope as a biospecimen repository with associated personal and family medical history, and psychosocial and clinical follow-up data collection. Collaborating community-based oncogenetic practice sites across the U.S. and Latin America are recruiting thousands of genetic cancer risk assessment patients annually.
 
 
 
 
 
In addition, CGEP staff participate in educational outreach to medical groups, hospital medical staffs and other community health care professionals. The program is supported in part by the National Cancer Institute and the California Research Program.
 

Clinical Cancer Genetics

Clinical Cancer Genetics

 
 
 Mission Statement:
 The City of Hope Division of
 Clinical Cancer Genetics is
 committed to being a national
 leader in the advancement
 of cancer genetics, screening
 and prevention, through
 innovative patient care,
 research and education.
 
 
In light of a growing body of research confirming that many common cancers, including breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer, are hereditary, the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics (CCG) Cancer Screening & Prevention Program helps people understand their personal cancer risk profiles, offering a comprehensive cancer risk assessment that takes into account family history and genetics, along with environmental and lifestyle factors. With this information, people can take proactive steps to “outsmart cancer.”
 
 
 
 
The division’s Cancer Genetics Education Program (CGEP) offers courses and professional development tools designed to further health care professionals’ understanding of cancer genetics.
 
 

Major initiatives include:

The Intensive Course (IC) promotes community-based, practitioner-level competence in the selection, application and interpretation of genetic testing in order to provide these critical services in underserved areas.
 
 
 
The Clinical Cancer Genetics Community of Practice (CCGCoP) is a network of clinicians who have graduated from the IC and/or the Cancer Genetics Career Development Program (CGCDP), along with members of the CCGCRN. Those who are part of this unique community have access to collaborators and professional support from other community members, and to enhanced continuing professional development activities offered by CCG.
 
 
 
In the Cancer Genetics Career Development Program, outstanding post-graduate research scientists receive training with a focus on cutting edge genetic and genomic technology. Graduates of this program continue their work in cancer genetics with the goal of reducing the burden of cancer among those at highest risk.
 
 
 
Clinical cancer genetics research at City of Hope investigates multiple approaches that utilize the latest findings in cancer genetics in order to improve the prevention, treatment, and support of those with hereditary cancers.
 
 
 
Major initiatives include:
 
The CCG molecular genetics research laboratory uses a multitude of research tests such as MLPA, long range PCR and next generation sequencing as well as a variety of state of the art equipment to prescreen high risk patients for mutations in cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2 and RAD51. Specific equipment available in the laboratory include:  -Sequenom MassArray Analyzer (MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry) -Sequenom MassArray Robotic Nanodispenser -Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine -Ion One Touch -Nanodrop 2000c spectrophotometer -Qubit 2.0 Fluorometer -ABI 3130xl Genetic Analyzer -Veriti 96 well thermocyclers -Gene Amp 9700 PCR systems
 
 
 
 
An essential but often unmet aspect of providing quality care to persons affected by cancer or those at hereditary cancer risk is addressing their psychosocial needs. As such, understanding and minimizing the negative impact of hereditary cancer risk on persons' lives is the focus of the CCG Clinical and Behavioral Research program. The program studies health-related behaviors, quality of life (including emotional, psychological and basic daily living needs), and ethical, legal, and social issues, by going directly to the source--our patients and their family members.
 
 
 
 
An integral component of the research program is the Cancer Genetics Community Research Network (CCGCRN), a prospective research registry protocol initiated at City of Hope as a biospecimen repository with associated personal and family medical history, and psychosocial and clinical follow-up data collection. Collaborating community-based oncogenetic practice sites across the U.S. and Latin America are recruiting thousands of genetic cancer risk assessment patients annually.
 
 
 
 
 
In addition, CGEP staff participate in educational outreach to medical groups, hospital medical staffs and other community health care professionals. The program is supported in part by the National Cancer Institute and the California Research Program.
 
Clinical Cancer Genetics
The City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics is committed to being a national leader in the advancement of cancer genetics, screening and prevention, through innovative patient care, research and education.

Contact Us
  • 800-826-HOPE (4673)
  • For more information about the Cancer Screening & Prevention Program, call 626-256-8662, ext. 2.
Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is internationally  recognized for its innovative biomedical research.
City of Hope is one of only 41 Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country, the highest designation awarded by the National Cancer Institute to institutions that lead the way in cancer research, treatment, prevention and professional education.
Learn more about City of Hope's institutional distinctions, breakthrough innovations and collaborations.
City of Hope Breakthroughs
Get the latest in City of Hope's research, treatment and news you can use on our blog, Breakthroughs.
 
 


NEWS & UPDATES
  • Henry Ford said it well: “Working together is success.” For biomedical researchers, this is especially true. The challenges they face often require expertise from multiple fields to find answers and solutions. Scientists seeking cures for type 1 diabetes in particular must overcome biological, medical and techn...
  • Superheroes are making plenty of headlines as the summer blockbuster season opens. At City of Hope, a 9-year-old girl wept as she hugged her own superhero: someone who had the superpower of healing her cancer. He didn’t wear flashy armor or a cape, but rather a plaid shirt. He doesn’t have a secret ...
  • Known for his ability to bring together, and lead, effective research teams, world-renowned translational research scientist and physician Larry W. Kwak, M.D., Ph.D., has joined City of Hope in a key leadership role within the institution’s new Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Instit...
  • To detect melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, at its earliest, most treatable stage, conduct a head-to-toe skin self-examination once a month to check for suspicious moles.   Unusual, or atypical, moles can ultimately develop into skin cancer. Here is the ABCDE guide to potentially cancerous mol...
  • “Superheroes,” “grateful” and “lifesavers”: All are words patients have used to describe their bone marrow donors. For donors, “a great feeling” and “the right thing to do” seems to sum up their view of donating the stem cells used to save someone’s life. Bone marrow transplants of...
  • Updated: May 1, 2015 More than a decade after joining the bone marrow registry during a blood drive at the United States Military Academy at West Point, Phil Ratcliff received a call that he was a match for a leukemia patient. By then, he’d left his military career to start his own financial business, married [...
  • Updated: May 1. For Lars Nijland, the reason to become a member of a bone marrow registry was simple. “I always thought there would be no easier way to save somebody’s life,” said the 24-year-old student at Germany’s University of Goettingen, who signed up for the registry during a drive on his campus. Ni...
  • Updated: May 1 No parent ever wants to see their child hurting or sick in any way. Joanne Cooper’s daughter Amanda wasn’t sick, though. She seemed healthy. Vibrant. A straight-A student whose only major health ailment had been bouts of stress-related nausea. Then a blood test revealed that Amanda – now 9 years ...
  • Noe Chavez became animated when he recalled the story: “We were running a health event, screening folks for diabetes,” said the enthusiastic City of Hope population health researcher, “and this man comes over and starts talking to us about the trouble he’s having with his eyes. I spoke with him, listened ...
  • When Keith McKinny, 29, was first diagnosed with lymphoma and leukemia in 2010, the first person he thought of was former boyfriend Jason Mullins. The two hadn’t been in contact with each other for some time, but McKinny couldn’t think of anyone else with whom he wanted to be during that difficult period....
  • Updated: May 1 Yesenia Portillo’s search for a bone marrow donor started close to home. Her brother, sister and seven cousins all underwent testing, but none of them were a close enough match to donate the bone marrow stem cells she desperately needed for her transplant. Yesenia, now almost 16, had always been ...
  • Some of City of Hope’s most high-impact achievements have arisen from City of Hope’s globally recognized bone marrow transplant (BMT) program. The annual Karl G. Blume – Gerhard Schmidt Memorial Lecture in Transplantation Biology & Medicine — commemorating two of the most influential and revered...
  • Guido Marcucci, M.D., wants to put himself out of business. A respected clinician and esteemed basic and translational scientist, Marcucci joins City of Hope as co-director of the Gehr Family Center for Leukemia Research within the Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute. In this positi...
  • To say that myelofibrosis patients need more treatment options would be an understatement. The severely low platelet counts, known as thrombocytopenia, that are one of the hallmark symptoms of the disease can lead to chronic fatigue and weakness that not only damage quality of life but, ultimately, shorten life...
  • Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer often stop responding to the primary drugs used against the disease, leaving them with few options and little hope. Determined to increase those options, doctors and researchers at City of Hope are conducting two clinical trials that could lead to new treatments for pe...